Carbon Dioxide Photos on Townhall

  •  - The American Electric Power Company's coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in New Haven, West Virginia

    The American Electric Power Company's coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in New Haven, West Virginia

    Posted: 3/28/2012 3:29:08 AM EST
    The American Electric Power Company's cooling tower at their coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in this file photo taken October 27, 2009 in New Haven, West Virginia. The Obama administration proposed March 27, 2012 the first ever standards to cut carbon dioxide emissions from new power plants, a move likely to be hotly contested by Republicans and industry in an election year. The Environmental Protection Agency proposed the long-delayed rules that limit emissions from all new U.S. power stations, which would effectively bar the building of any new coal plants. REUTERS/Ayesha Rascoe/Files
  •  - The American Electric Power Company's coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in New Haven, West Virginia

    The American Electric Power Company's coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in New Haven, West Virginia

    Posted: 3/28/2012 3:28:48 AM EST
    The American Electric Power Company's cooling tower at their coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in this file photo taken October 27, 2009 in New Haven, West Virginia. The Obama administration proposed March 27, 2012 the first ever standards to cut carbon dioxide emissions from new power plants, a move likely to be hotly contested by Republicans and industry in an election year. The Environmental Protection Agency proposed the long-delayed rules that limit emissions from all new U.S. power stations, which would effectively bar the building of any new coal plants. REUTERS/Ayesha Rascoe/Files
  •  - The American Electric Power Company's coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in New Haven, West Virginia

    The American Electric Power Company's coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in New Haven, West Virginia

    Posted: 3/27/2012 3:43:11 PM EST
    The American Electric Power Company's cooling tower at their coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in this file photo taken October 27, 2009 in New Haven, West Virginia. The Obama administration proposed March 27, 2012 the first ever standards to cut carbon dioxide emissions from new power plants, a move likely to be hotly contested by Republicans and industry in an election year. The Environmental Protection Agency proposed the long-delayed rules that limit emissions from all new U.S. power stations, which would effectively bar the building of any new coal plants. REUTERS/Ayesha Rascoe/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENERGY POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
  •  - Smoke billows from the chimneys of a coal-burning power station in central Beijing

    Smoke billows from the chimneys of a coal-burning power station in central Beijing

    Posted: 3/14/2012 9:27:29 PM EST
    Smoke billows from the chimneys of a coal-burning power station in central Beijing March 15, 2012. Beijing has pledged to reduce carbon intensity -- the amount produced per unit of gross domestic product -- by 17 percent over 2011-2015, and big heavy industrial emitters will be compelled to cut CO2 produced per unit of output by more than 20 percent by the end of 2015. The country emitted 8.33 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide in 2010, a quarter of the global total, according to BP's annual Statistical Review of World Energy released last June. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS ENERGY)
  •  - Smoke billows from the chimneys of a coal-burning power station in central Beijing

    Smoke billows from the chimneys of a coal-burning power station in central Beijing

    Posted: 3/14/2012 9:05:26 PM EST
    Smoke billows from the chimneys of a coal-burning power station in central Beijing March 15, 2012. Beijing has pledged to reduce carbon intensity -- the amount produced per unit of gross domestic product -- by 17 percent over 2011-2015, and big heavy industrial emitters will be compelled to cut CO2 produced per unit of output by more than 20 percent by the end of 2015. The country emitted 8.33 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide in 2010, a quarter of the global total, according to BP's annual Statistical Review of World Energy released last June. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS ENERGY)
  •  - A worker from "APB BirdLife Belarus" carries an equipment for measuring carbon dioxide gas in a marsh near Bartenikh

    A worker from "APB BirdLife Belarus" carries an equipment for measuring carbon dioxide gas in a marsh near Bartenikh

    Posted: 3/7/2012 2:18:49 PM EST
    Merten Minke, a worker from "APB BirdLife Belarus", carries an equipment for measuring carbon dioxide gas in a marsh near the village of Bartenikha, some 90 km (56 miles) west of Minsk, April 7, 2011. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko
  •  - Greenpeace activists protest against local energy policies outside SPD party leaders meeting in Potsdam

    Greenpeace activists protest against local energy policies outside SPD party leaders meeting in Potsdam

    Posted: 1/29/2012 11:19:24 AM EST
    Greenpeace activists set fire to the chemical sign of carbon dioxide that is mounted on a boat on Templin near the venue of a party leaders' meeting of the Social Democratic Party (SPD) to protest against the local state premier's energy policies in Potsdam near Berlin, January 29, 2012. The writing reads: "Dear SPD, Brandenburg State Premier Matthias Platzeck's brown coal blocks the energy transition!" REUTERS/Thomas Peter (GERMANY - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Greenpeace activists protest against local energy policies outside SPD party leaders meeting in Potsdam

    Greenpeace activists protest against local energy policies outside SPD party leaders meeting in Potsdam

    Posted: 1/29/2012 11:18:32 AM EST
    Greenpeace activists set fire to the chemical sign of carbon dioxide that is mounted on a boat on Templin near the venue of a party leaders' meeting of the Social Democratic Party (SPD) to protest against the local state premier's energy policies in Potsdam near Berlin, January 29, 2012. The writing reads: "Dear SPD, Brandenburg State Premier Matthias Platzeck's brown coal blocks the energy transition!" REUTERS/Thomas Peter (GERMANY - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY CIVIL UNREST)
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    Posted: 1/6/2012 8:45:47 AM EST
    Brownsville city manager Charlie Cabler, left, holds up a photo of the carbon dioxide powered pellet handgun 15-year-old Jaime Gonzalez was holding at the time he was shot by police at Cummings Middle School as Police Chief Orlando Rodriguez speaks during a news conference Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2012 in Brownsville, Texas. (AP Photo/The Brownsville Herald, Yvette Vela)
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    Posted: 1/5/2012 8:25:46 AM EST
    A photo of the carbon dioxide powered pellet handgun 15-year-old Jaime Gonzalez was holding at the time he was shot by police at Cummings Middle School is shown during a news conference Wednesday morning, Jan. 4, 2012 in Brownsville, Texas. (AP Photo/The Brownsville Herald, Yvette Vela)
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    Posted: 12/20/2011 9:30:45 PM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 16, 2009 file photo, steam and smoke rises from a coal power station in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. Europe's main weapon in the battle against climate change is now fighting for its own survival. In early January, investors in the continent's cap-and-trade system still had to pay some euro14 ($18.30) for the right to emit one ton of carbon dioxide into the air. By last week, the price of one emission allowance had tumbled to a meager euro6.41, making it much cheaper to pollute and slashing the financial incentives for companies to invest in low-carbon technologies. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
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    Posted: 11/3/2011 7:35:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Saturday, Jan. 9, 2010 file photo, an airplane lifts off at Berlin's Tegel airport during snowy and stormy weather. The world's emissions of heat-trapping carbon dioxide took the biggest jump on record, the U.S. Department of Energy calculated, a sign of how feeble the world's efforts are at slowing man-made global warming. The new figures for 2010 mean that levels of greenhouse gases are higher than the worst case scenario outlined by climate change experts just four years ago. China, the United States and India are the world's top producers of greenhouse gases. Tom Boden, director of the Energy Department's Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center at Oak Ridge National Lab, said that in 2010 people were traveling, and manufacturing was back up worldwide, spurring the use of fossil fuels, the chief contributor of man-made climate change. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
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    Posted: 11/3/2011 7:35:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 30, 2010 file photo, workers repair electrical wires along the banks of the Ganges River in Allahabad, India. The world's emissions of heat-trapping carbon dioxide took the biggest jump on record, the U.S. Department of Energy calculated, a sign of how feeble the world's efforts are at slowing man-made global warming. The new figures for 2010 mean that levels of greenhouse gases are higher than the worst case scenario outlined by climate change experts just four years ago. China, the United States and India are the world's top producers of greenhouse gases. Tom Boden, director of the Energy Department's Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center at Oak Ridge National Lab, said that in 2010 people were traveling, and manufacturing was back up worldwide, spurring the use of fossil fuels, the chief contributor of man-made climate change. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)
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    Posted: 11/3/2011 7:35:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Thursday, April 29, 2010 file photo, a pair of coal trains idle on the tracks near Dry Fork Station, a coal-fired power plant being built by the Basin Electric Power Cooperative near Gillette, Wyo. The world's emissions of heat-trapping carbon dioxide took the biggest jump on record, the U.S. Department of Energy calculated, a sign of how feeble the world's efforts are at slowing man-made global warming. The new figures for 2010 mean that levels of greenhouse gases are higher than the worst case scenario outlined by climate change experts just four years ago. China, the United States and India are the world's top producers of greenhouse gases. Tom Boden, director of the Energy Department's Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center at Oak Ridge National Lab, said that in 2010 people were traveling, and manufacturing was back up worldwide, spurring the use of fossil fuels, the chief contributor of man-made climate change. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown)
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    Posted: 11/3/2011 7:35:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Friday, Dec. 17, 2010 file photo, workers cycle past a coal-fired power plant on a tricycle cart in Changchun, in northeast China's Jilin province. The world's emissions of heat-trapping carbon dioxide took the biggest jump on record, the U.S. Department of Energy calculated, a sign of how feeble the world's efforts are at slowing man-made global warming. The new figures for 2010 mean that levels of greenhouse gases are higher than the worst case scenario outlined by climate change experts just four years ago. China, the United States and India are the world's top producers of greenhouse gases. Tom Boden, director of the Energy Department's Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center at Oak Ridge National Lab, said that in 2010 people were traveling, and manufacturing was back up worldwide, spurring the use of fossil fuels, the chief contributor of man-made climate change. (AP Photo)
  •  - Volkswagen employees hold up pro-Volkswagen placards while Greenpeace activists stretch a banner critizing Volkswagon's environmental policies outside the International Motor Show (IAA) in Frankfurt

    Volkswagen employees hold up pro-Volkswagen placards while Greenpeace activists stretch a banner critizing Volkswagon's environmental policies outside the International Motor Show (IAA) in Frankfurt

    Posted: 9/15/2011 10:19:56 AM EST
    Volkswagen employees hold up pro-Volkswagen placards while Greenpeace activists stretch a banner criticising Volkswagen's environmental policies outside the International Motor Show (IAA) in Frankfurt September 15, 2011. The banner of Greenpeace reads: "Not up! to date" (a play on Volkswagen's new car dubbed the "up!" which the company claims produces carbon dioxide emissions of just 79 g/km) and "Climate Destruction Made in Germany". The placards of Volkswagen employees in front read: 'Blue is the new Green' and 'Clean cars for everyone.' REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS)
  •  - Greenpeace protestors hang a banner critizing Volkswagon's environmental policies outside the International Motor Show in Frankfurt

    Greenpeace protestors hang a banner critizing Volkswagon's environmental policies outside the International Motor Show in Frankfurt

    Posted: 9/15/2011 9:18:42 AM EST
    Greenpeace protestors stand under a banner critizing Volkswagon's environmental policies outside the International Motor Show (IAA) in Frankfurt September 15, 2011. The banners headline "Not up! to date" is a play on Volkswagen's new car dubbed the "up!" which the company claims produces carbon dioxide emissions of just 79 g/km. The bottom line reads "Climate Destruction Made in Germany". REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT POLITICS CONFLICT)
  •  - Visitor looks at a Greenpeace banner critizing Volkswagon's environmental policies outside the International Motor Show in Frankfurt

    Visitor looks at a Greenpeace banner critizing Volkswagon's environmental policies outside the International Motor Show in Frankfurt

    Posted: 9/15/2011 9:12:52 AM EST
    A visitor looks at a Greenpeace banner critizing Volkswagon's environmental policies outside the International Motor Show (IAA) in Frankfurt September 15, 2011. The banners headline "Not up! to date" is a play on Volkswagen's new car dubbed the "up!" which the company claims produces carbon dioxide emissions of just 79 g/km. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT POLITICS)
  •  - Greenpeace protestors hang a banner critizing Volkswagon's environmental policies outside the International Motor Show in Frankfurt

    Greenpeace protestors hang a banner critizing Volkswagon's environmental policies outside the International Motor Show in Frankfurt

    Posted: 9/15/2011 9:10:44 AM EST
    Greenpeace protestors hang a banner critizing Volkswagon's environmental policies outside the International Motor Show (IAA) in Frankfurt September 15, 2011. The banners headline "Not up! to date" is a play on Volkswagen's new car dubbed the "up!" which the company claims produces carbon dioxide emissions of just 79 g/km. REUTERS/Alex Domanski (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT POLITICS CONFLICT)
  •  - Greenpeace protestors hang a banner critizing Volkswagon's environmental policies outside the International Motor Show in Frankfurt

    Greenpeace protestors hang a banner critizing Volkswagon's environmental policies outside the International Motor Show in Frankfurt

    Posted: 9/15/2011 9:10:12 AM EST
    Greenpeace protestors hang a banner critizing Volkswagon's environmental policies outside the International Motor Show (IAA) in Frankfurt September 15, 2011. The banners headline "Not up! to date" is a play on Volkswagen's new car dubbed the "up!" which the company claims produces carbon dioxide emissions of just 79 g/km. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT POLITICS)


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