Bureaucrats Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 5/21/2011 11:55:47 AM EST
    In this Wednesday, March 16, 2011 photo, a young boy, displaced after his neighborhood was razed down, irons his clothes in a small room which is shared by 6 other family members, in a shanty town in New Delhi. Slums are demolished nearly every week in India because the land has become too valuable, or the slum has become an eyesore, or when a politician wants to push out opposition voters. Meanwhile residents are left struggling against vulturous landlords, corrupt bureaucrats and an inept, overburdened legal system that gives them little recourse to justice when the bulldozers come. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
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    Posted: 5/21/2011 11:55:47 AM EST
    In this Wednesday, March 16, 2011 photo, residents of a shanty town look on near Raj Niwas, what was once called Ludlow Castle Road, in New Delhi. Slums are demolished nearly every week in India because the land has become too valuable, or the slum has become an eyesore, or when a politician wants to push out opposition voters. Meanwhile residents are left struggling against vulturous landlords, corrupt bureaucrats and an inept, overburdened legal system that gives them little recourse to justice when the bulldozers come. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
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    Posted: 5/21/2011 11:55:47 AM EST
    In this Wednesday, March 16, 2011 photo, Anshu looks out from her new one-room house after her previous home was razed by the government in New Delhi, Wednesday, March 16, 2011. Slums are demolished nearly every week in India because the land has become too valuable, or the slum has become an eyesore, or when a politician wants to push out opposition voters. Meanwhile residents are left struggling against vulturous landlords, corrupt bureaucrats and an inept, overburdened legal system that gives them little recourse to justice when the bulldozers come. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
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    Posted: 5/21/2011 11:55:47 AM EST
    In this Wednesday, March 16, 2011 photo, residents of a shanty town near Raj Niwas, what was once called Ludlow Castle Road, walk past apartment buildings under construction in New Delhi. Slums are demolished nearly every week in India because the land has become too valuable, or the slum has become an eyesore, or when a politician wants to push out opposition voters. Meanwhile residents are left struggling against vulturous landlords, corrupt bureaucrats and an inept, overburdened legal system that gives them little recourse to justice when the bulldozers come. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
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    Posted: 5/21/2011 11:55:47 AM EST
    In this Wednesday, March 16, 2011 photo, residents of a shanty town near Raj Niwas, what was once called Ludlow Castle Road, wait to fill drinking water from a public tap in New Delhi. Slums are demolished nearly every week in India because the land has become too valuable, or the slum has become an eyesore, or when a politician wants to push out opposition voters. Meanwhile residents are left struggling against vulturous landlords, corrupt bureaucrats and an inept, overburdened legal system that gives them little recourse to justice when the bulldozers come. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
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    Posted: 5/21/2011 11:55:46 AM EST
    In this Wednesday, March 16, 2011 photo, Dharam Das whose shanty home on No. 8 Raj Niwas Marg, which was once called Ludlow Castle Road, was demolished by the government, looks on along with his family at their new home in New Delhi. Slums are demolished nearly every week in India because the land has become too valuable, or the slum has become an eyesore, or when a politician wants to push out opposition voters. Meanwhile residents are left struggling against vulturous landlords, corrupt bureaucrats and an inept, overburdened legal system that gives them little recourse to justice when the bulldozers come. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
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    Posted: 5/21/2011 11:55:46 AM EST
    In this Wednesday, March 16, 2011 photo, a man stands outside his home in a shanty town near Raj Niwas, what was once called Ludlow Castle Road, in New Delhi. Slums are demolished nearly every week in India because the land has become too valuable, or the slum has become an eyesore, or when a politician wants to push out opposition voters. Meanwhile residents are left struggling against vulturous landlords, corrupt bureaucrats and an inept, overburdened legal system that gives them little recourse to justice when the bulldozers come. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
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    Posted: 5/21/2011 11:55:46 AM EST
    In this Wednesday, March 16, 2011 photo, residents of a shanty town near Raj Niwas, what was once called Ludlow Castle Road, walk past an open garbage dump in New Delhi. Slums are demolished nearly every week in India because the land has become too valuable, or the slum has become an eyesore, or when a politician wants to push out opposition voters. Meanwhile residents are left struggling against vulturous landlords, corrupt bureaucrats and an inept, overburdened legal system that gives them little recourse to justice when the bulldozers come. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
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    Posted: 5/4/2011 2:42:21 AM EST
    In this April 15, 2011 photo, Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) President Masataka Shimizu, speaks during a press conference at the TEPCO headquarters in Tokyo, Japan. For four hours every evening, Japanese bureaucrats and utility officials politely take turns talking about radioactive isotopes, soil samples, water levels and the extensive tsunami damage at a crippled nuclear power plant. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama)
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    Posted: 5/4/2011 2:42:19 AM EST
    FILE - In this April 13, 2011 file photo, Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) President Masataka Shimizu, center, attends a press conference at TEPCO headquarters in Tokyo. For four hours every evening, Japanese bureaucrats and utility officials politely take turns talking about radioactive isotopes, soil samples, water levels and the extensive tsunami damage at a crippled nuclear power plant. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, File)
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    Posted: 5/2/2011 4:55:05 AM EST
    FILE - In this April 12, 2011 file photo, Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano tastes a tomato produced in Iwaki city, Fukushima prefecture, the state where a stricken nuclear plant is located, during an event to help selling farm products which are approved safe to eat by the government's radiation test, in Tokyo. The aftermath of the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami may finally persuade a nation long enchanted with nuclear power that intimate ties between regulator and regulated can create significant potential conflicts of interest. The government's chief spokesman Edano promised recently to curb the ability of bureaucrats to depart for jobs at utilities. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, File)
  •  - Retired General Hillier shakes hands with a member of the Canadian military during a signing for his book in Halifax

    Retired General Hillier shakes hands with a member of the Canadian military during a signing for his book in Halifax

    Posted: 2/11/2010 5:24:15 PM EST
    REFILE - CORRECTING TIME OF RETIREMENT Retired General Rick Hillier (L) shakes hands with a member of the Canadian military during a signing for his book, "A Soldier First, Bullets, Bureaucrats and the Politics of War", at the Windsor Park CANEX in Halifax, Nova Scotia, February 11, 2010. General Hillier had retired after serving as Chief of the Defence Staff in July 2008. REUTERS/Paul Darrow (CANADA - Tags: MILITARY MEDIA)
  •  - Retired General Hillier speaks to a member of the Canadian navy during a signing for his book in Halifax

    Retired General Hillier speaks to a member of the Canadian navy during a signing for his book in Halifax

    Posted: 2/11/2010 5:23:11 PM EST
    REFILE - CORRECTING TIME OF RETIREMENT Retired General Rick Hillier (L) speaks to a member of the Canadian navy during a signing for his book, "A Soldier First, Bullets, Bureaucrats and the Politics of War", at the Windsor Park CANEX in Halifax, Nova Scotia, February 11, 2010. General Hillier had retired after serving as Chief of the Defence Staff in July 2008. REUTERS/Paul Darrow (CANADA - Tags: MILITARY MEDIA)
  •  - Retired General Hillier shakes hands with a member of the Canadian military during a signing for his book in Halifax

    Retired General Hillier shakes hands with a member of the Canadian military during a signing for his book in Halifax

    Posted: 2/11/2010 3:43:42 PM EST
    Retired General Rick Hillier (L) shakes hands with a member of the Canadian military during a signing for his book, "A Soldier First, Bullets, Bureaucrats and the Politics of War", at the Windsor Park CANEX in Halifax, Nova Scotia, February 11, 2010. General Hillier had retired after serving as Chief of the Defence Staff last July. REUTERS/Paul Darrow (CANADA - Tags: MILITARY MEDIA)
  •  - Retired General Hillier speaks to a member of the Canadian navy during a signing for his book in Halifax

    Retired General Hillier speaks to a member of the Canadian navy during a signing for his book in Halifax

    Posted: 2/11/2010 3:42:19 PM EST
    Retired General Rick Hillier (L) speaks to a member of the Canadian navy during a signing for his book, "A Soldier First, Bullets, Bureaucrats and the Politics of War", at the Windsor Park CANEX in Halifax, Nova Scotia, February 11, 2010. General Hillier had retired after serving as Chief of the Defence Staff last July. REUTERS/Paul Darrow (CANADA - Tags: MILITARY MEDIA)
  •  - Japan's Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama inspects a debate between government appointed panels between bureaucrats over spending cuts at makeshift offices in a gym in Tokyo

    Japan's Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama inspects a debate between government appointed panels between bureaucrats over spending cuts at makeshift offices in a gym in Tokyo

    Posted: 11/24/2009 2:32:52 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama inspects a debate between government appointed panels and bureaucrats over spending cuts at makeshift offices in a gym in Tokyo November 24, 2009. A former aide to Hatoyama may be charged with falsifying political funding records, the Asahi newspaper said on Tuesday, a development that could damage support for the government ahead of a key election. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN POLITICS)
  •  - Japan's PM Hatoyama inspects debate between government appointed panels and bureaucrats in Tokyo

    Japan's PM Hatoyama inspects debate between government appointed panels and bureaucrats in Tokyo

    Posted: 11/24/2009 2:32:14 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama inspects a debate between government appointed panels and bureaucrats over spending cuts at makeshift offices in a gym in Tokyo November 24, 2009. A former aide to Hatoyama may be charged with falsifying political funding records, the Asahi newspaper said on Tuesday, a development that could damage support for the government ahead of a key election. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN POLITICS)
  •  - Japan's Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama walks past a white board during a inspection tour in Tokyo

    Japan's Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama walks past a white board during a inspection tour in Tokyo

    Posted: 11/24/2009 2:11:38 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama walks past a white board showing the showing the results of debate between government appointed panels and bureaucrats over spending cuts during a inspection tour at a makeshift offices in a gym in Tokyo November 24, 2009. The names of projects and words such as "budget cut" and "cancelled" are written on the board. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN POLITICS)
  •  - Japan's Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama inspects a debate between government appointed panels and bureaucrats over spending cuts at a makeshift offices in a gym in Tokyo

    Japan's Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama inspects a debate between government appointed panels and bureaucrats over spending cuts at a makeshift offices in a gym in Tokyo

    Posted: 11/24/2009 2:10:37 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama inspects a debate between government appointed panels and bureaucrats over spending cuts at a makeshift offices in a gym in Tokyo November 24, 2009. A former aide to Japanese Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama may be charged with falsifying political funding records, the Asahi newspaper said on Tuesday, a development that could damage support for the government ahead of a key election. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN POLITICS)
  •  - Japan's PM Hatoyama inspects a debate between government appointed panels and bureaucrats over spending cuts at a makeshift office in a gym in Tokyo

    Japan's PM Hatoyama inspects a debate between government appointed panels and bureaucrats over spending cuts at a makeshift office in a gym in Tokyo

    Posted: 11/24/2009 2:07:13 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama inspects a debate between government appointed panels and bureaucrats over spending cuts at a makeshift offices in a gym in Tokyo November 24, 2009. A former aide to Hatoyama may be charged with falsifying political funding records, the Asahi newspaper said on Tuesday, a development that could damage support for the government ahead of a key election. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN POLITICS HEADSHOT)