Budget Cuts Photos on Townhall

  •  - U.S. Marines work with instructors on building-clearing drill as they train to be members of FAST unit at training ground in Chesapeake

    U.S. Marines work with instructors on building-clearing drill as they train to be members of FAST unit at training ground in Chesapeake

    Posted: 9/26/2012 6:26:39 PM EST
    U.S. Marines work with instructors on a building-clearing drill as they train to be members of a Fleet Antiterrorism Security Team (FAST) unit at a training ground in Chesapeake, Virginia, September 25, 2012. Marine Corps officials say the intense training done at this site is imperative to ensure the young Marines will be ready to respond to threats against U.S. facilities on a moment's notice. But, they say, looming budget cuts may threaten the pace and realism of the training. The men who serve in the Marine Corps Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Teams (FAST) sign up for an extra, fifth year of service to get a spot on the high-speed force, then spend nearly four weeks of 10-hour days training at this Cold War-era Navy listening station. Picture taken September 25, 2012. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  - U.S. Marine signals approaching vehicle to stop during embassy security simulation as he trains to be member of FAST unit at training ground in Chesapeake

    U.S. Marine signals approaching vehicle to stop during embassy security simulation as he trains to be member of FAST unit at training ground in Chesapeake

    Posted: 9/26/2012 6:26:39 PM EST
    A U.S. Marine signals an approaching vehicle to stop during an embassy security simulation as he trains to be a member of a Fleet Antiterrorism Security Team (FAST) unit at a training ground in Chesapeake, Virginia, September 25, 2012. Marine Corps officials say the intense training done at this site is imperative to ensure the young Marines will be ready to respond to threats against U.S. facilities on a moment's notice. But, they say, looming budget cuts may threaten the pace and realism of the training. The men who serve in the Marine Corps Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Teams (FAST) sign up for an extra, fifth year of service to get a spot on the high-speed force, then spend nearly four weeks of 10-hour days training at this Cold War-era Navy listening station. Picture taken September 25, 2012. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  - U.S. Marines wait to enter building in room-clearing drill as they train to be members of FAST unit at a training ground in Chesapeake

    U.S. Marines wait to enter building in room-clearing drill as they train to be members of FAST unit at a training ground in Chesapeake

    Posted: 9/26/2012 6:26:39 PM EST
    U.S. Marines wait to enter building in a room-clearing drill as they train to be members of a Fleet Antiterrorism Security Team (FAST) unit at a training ground in Chesapeake, Virginia, September 25, 2012. Marine Corps officials say the intense training done at this site is imperative to ensure the young Marines will be ready to respond to threats against U.S. facilities on a moment's notice. But, they say, looming budget cuts may threaten the pace and realism of the training. The men who serve in the Marine Corps Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Teams (FAST) sign up for an extra, fifth year of service to get a spot on the high-speed force, then spend nearly four weeks of 10-hour days training at this Cold War-era Navy listening station. Picture taken September 25, 2012. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  - U.S. Marines conduct room-clearing drill as they train to be members of FAST unit at a training ground in Chesapeake

    U.S. Marines conduct room-clearing drill as they train to be members of FAST unit at a training ground in Chesapeake

    Posted: 9/26/2012 6:26:39 PM EST
    U.S. Marines conduct a room-clearing drill as they train to be members of a Fleet Antiterrorism Security Team (FAST) unit at a training ground in Chesapeake, Virginia, September 25, 2012. Marine Corps officials say the intense training done at this site is imperative to ensure the young Marines will be ready to respond to threats against U.S. facilities on a moment's notice. But, they say, looming budget cuts may threaten the pace and realism of the training. The men who serve in the Marine Corps Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Teams (FAST) sign up for an extra, fifth year of service to get a spot on the high-speed force, then spend nearly four weeks of 10-hour days training at this Cold War-era Navy listening station. Picture taken September 25, 2012. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  - U.S. Marines train on firing range to be members of FAST unit at training ground in Chesapeake

    U.S. Marines train on firing range to be members of FAST unit at training ground in Chesapeake

    Posted: 9/26/2012 6:26:39 PM EST
    U.S. Marines train on a firing range to be members of a Fleet Antiterrorism Security Team (FAST) unit at a training ground in Chesapeake, Virginia, September 25, 2012. Marine Corps officials say the intense training done at this site is imperative to ensure the young Marines will be ready to respond to threats against U.S. facilities on a moment's notice. But, they say, looming budget cuts may threaten the pace and realism of the training. The men who serve in the Marine Corps Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Teams (FAST) sign up for an extra, fifth year of service to get a spot on the high-speed force, then spend nearly four weeks of 10-hour days training at this Cold War-era Navy listening station. Picture taken September 25, 2012. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  - U.S. Marines train with shotguns on firing range to be members of FAST unit at a training ground in Chesapeake

    U.S. Marines train with shotguns on firing range to be members of FAST unit at a training ground in Chesapeake

    Posted: 9/26/2012 6:26:39 PM EST
    U.S. Marines train with shotguns on a firing range to be members of a Fleet Antiterrorism Security Team (FAST) unit at a training ground in Chesapeake, Virginia, September 25, 2012. Marine Corps officials say the intense training done at this site is imperative to ensure the young Marines will be ready to respond to threats against U.S. facilities on a moment's notice. But, they say, looming budget cuts may threaten the pace and realism of the training. The men who serve in the Marine Corps Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Teams (FAST) sign up for an extra, fifth year of service to get a spot on the high-speed force, then spend nearly four weeks of 10-hour days training at this Cold War-era Navy listening station. Picture taken September 25, 2012. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  - U.S. Marines train with shotguns on firing range to be members of FAST unit at training ground in Chesapeake

    U.S. Marines train with shotguns on firing range to be members of FAST unit at training ground in Chesapeake

    Posted: 9/26/2012 6:26:39 PM EST
    U.S. Marines train with shotguns on a firing range to be members of a Fleet Antiterrorism Security Team (FAST) unit at a training ground in Chesapeake, Virginia, September 25, 2012. Marine Corps officials say the intense training done at this site is imperative to ensure the young Marines will be ready to respond to threats against U.S. facilities on a moment's notice. But, they say, looming budget cuts may threaten the pace and realism of the training. The men who serve in the Marine Corps Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Teams (FAST) sign up for an extra, fifth year of service to get a spot on the high-speed force, then spend nearly four weeks of 10-hour days training at this Cold War-era Navy listening station. Picture taken September 25, 2012. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  - U.S. Marines enter building in room-clearing drill as they train to be members of FAST unit at a training ground in Chesapeake

    U.S. Marines enter building in room-clearing drill as they train to be members of FAST unit at a training ground in Chesapeake

    Posted: 9/26/2012 6:26:39 PM EST
    U.S. Marines enter building in a room-clearing drill as they train to be members of a Fleet Antiterrorism Security Team (FAST) unit at a training ground in Chesapeake, Virginia, September 25, 2012. Marine Corps officials say the intense training done at this site is imperative to ensure the young Marines will be ready to respond to threats against U.S. facilities on a moment's notice. But, they say, looming budget cuts may threaten the pace and realism of the training. The men who serve in the Marine Corps Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Teams (FAST) sign up for an extra, fifth year of service to get a spot on the high-speed force, then spend nearly four weeks of 10-hour days training at this Cold War-era Navy listening station. Picture taken September 25, 2012. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  - U.S. Marines practice door-breaching as they train to be members of FAST unit at training ground in Chesapeake

    U.S. Marines practice door-breaching as they train to be members of FAST unit at training ground in Chesapeake

    Posted: 9/26/2012 6:26:39 PM EST
    U.S. Marines practice door-breaching as they train to be members of a Fleet Antiterrorism Security Team (FAST) unit at a training ground in Chesapeake, Virginia, September 25, 2012. Marine Corps officials say the intense training done at this site is imperative to ensure the young Marines will be ready to respond to threats against U.S. facilities on a moment's notice. But, they say, looming budget cuts may threaten the pace and realism of the training. The men who serve in the Marine Corps Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Teams (FAST) sign up for an extra, fifth year of service to get a spot on the high-speed force, then spend nearly four weeks of 10-hour days training at this Cold War-era Navy listening station. Picture taken September 25, 2012. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  - U.S. Marines work with instructor on firing range as they train to be member of FAST unit at training ground in Chesapeake

    U.S. Marines work with instructor on firing range as they train to be member of FAST unit at training ground in Chesapeake

    Posted: 9/26/2012 6:26:39 PM EST
    U.S. Marines work with an instructor on the firing range as they train to be a member of a Fleet Antiterrorism Security Team (FAST) unit at a training ground in Chesapeake, Virginia, September 25, 2012. Marine Corps officials say the intense training done at this site is imperative to ensure the young Marines will be ready to respond to threats against U.S. facilities on a moment's notice. But, they say, looming budget cuts may threaten the pace and realism of the training. The men who serve in the Marine Corps Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Teams (FAST) sign up for an extra, fifth year of service to get a spot on the high-speed force, then spend nearly four weeks of 10-hour days training at this Cold War-era Navy listening station. Picture taken September 25, 2012. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  - An overview of the parliament during a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague

    An overview of the parliament during a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague

    Posted: 9/10/2012 9:55:31 AM EST
    An overview of the parliament during a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague April 24, 2012. REUTERS/Paul Vreeker/United Photos
  •  - An overview of the parliament during a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague

    An overview of the parliament during a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague

    Posted: 9/10/2012 9:55:31 AM EST
    An overview of the parliament during a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague April 24, 2012. REUTERS/Paul Vreeker/United Photos
  •  - Wilders of the Freedom Party attends a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague

    Wilders of the Freedom Party attends a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague

    Posted: 9/10/2012 5:03:29 AM EST
    Geert Wilders of the Freedom Party speaks during a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague April 24, 2012. REUTERS/Paul Vreeker/United Photos
  •  - Wilders of the Freedom Party attends a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague

    Wilders of the Freedom Party attends a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague

    Posted: 9/10/2012 5:03:29 AM EST
    Geert Wilders of the Freedom Party speaks during a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague April 24, 2012. REUTERS/Paul Vreeker/United Photos
  •  - Wilders of the Freedom Party attends a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague

    Wilders of the Freedom Party attends a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague

    Posted: 9/10/2012 4:39:32 AM EST
    Geert Wilders of the Freedom Party speaks during a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague April 24, 2012. REUTERS/Paul Vreeker/United Photos
  •  - Wilders of the Freedom Party attends a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague

    Wilders of the Freedom Party attends a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague

    Posted: 9/10/2012 4:38:28 AM EST
    Geert Wilders of the Freedom Party speaks during a debate about the government's resignation caused by a crisis over budget cuts in The Hague April 24, 2012. REUTERS/Paul Vreeker/United Photos
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              In this March 31, 2012 photo, people stand in the government-run Jose Luis Miranda Children's Hospital in Santa Clara, Cuba. Cuba's system of free medical care, long considered a birthr

    In this March 31, 2012 photo, people stand in the government-run Jose Luis Miranda Children's Hospital in Santa Clara, Cuba. Cuba's system of free medical care, long considered a birthr

    Posted: 8/25/2012 10:28:17 AM EST
    In this March 31, 2012 photo, people stand in the government-run Jose Luis Miranda Children's Hospital in Santa Clara, Cuba. Cuba's system of free medical care, long considered a birthright by its citizens and trumpeted as one of the communist government's great successes, is not immune to cutbacks under Raul Castro's drive for efficiency. The health sector has already endured millions of dollars in budget cuts and tens of thousands of layoffs, and Castro is looking for more ways to save. (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)
  •  - 
              In this Aug 16, 2012 photo, a poster that reads in Spanish "Your service is free health... but it costs" hangs on a wall inside a government run neighborhood clinic in Havana, Cuba. Cub

    In this Aug 16, 2012 photo, a poster that reads in Spanish "Your service is free health... but it costs" hangs on a wall inside a government run neighborhood clinic in Havana, Cuba. Cub

    Posted: 8/25/2012 10:28:17 AM EST
    In this Aug 16, 2012 photo, a poster that reads in Spanish "Your service is free health... but it costs" hangs on a wall inside a government run neighborhood clinic in Havana, Cuba. Cuba's system of free medical care, long considered a birthright by its citizens and trumpeted as one of the communist government's great successes, is not immune to cutbacks under Raul Castro's drive for efficiency. The health sector has already endured millions of dollars in budget cuts and tens of thousands of layoffs, and Castro is looking for more ways to save. (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)
  •  - 
              In this Aug 16, 2012 photo, a nurse checks the blood pressure of patient Niurka Rodriguez, who is eight months pregnant at a government run neighborhood clinic in Havana, Cuba. Cuba's s

    In this Aug 16, 2012 photo, a nurse checks the blood pressure of patient Niurka Rodriguez, who is eight months pregnant at a government run neighborhood clinic in Havana, Cuba. Cuba's s

    Posted: 8/25/2012 10:28:17 AM EST
    In this Aug 16, 2012 photo, a nurse checks the blood pressure of patient Niurka Rodriguez, who is eight months pregnant at a government run neighborhood clinic in Havana, Cuba. Cuba's system of free medical care, long considered a birthright by its citizens and trumpeted as one of the communist government's great successes, is not immune to cutbacks under Raul Castro's drive for efficiency. The health sector has already endured millions of dollars in budget cuts and tens of thousands of layoffs, and Castro is looking for more ways to save. (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)
  •  - 
              In this Aug 13, 2012 photo, a lab technician takes a blood sample for testing at the government run community Medical Clinic Robert Zulueta in Havana, Cuba. Cuba's system of free medica

    In this Aug 13, 2012 photo, a lab technician takes a blood sample for testing at the government run community Medical Clinic Robert Zulueta in Havana, Cuba. Cuba's system of free medica

    Posted: 8/25/2012 10:28:17 AM EST
    In this Aug 13, 2012 photo, a lab technician takes a blood sample for testing at the government run community Medical Clinic Robert Zulueta in Havana, Cuba. Cuba's system of free medical care, long considered a birthright by its citizens and trumpeted as one of the communist government's great successes, is not immune to cutbacks under Raul Castro's drive for efficiency. The health sector has already endured millions of dollars in budget cuts and tens of thousands of layoffs, and Castro is looking for more ways to save. (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)