board of education Photos on Townhall

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              Attorney James Ferguson, a law partner with Julius Chambers, announced his death during a news conference outside the firm's offices in Charlotte, N.C. on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013. Chambe

    Attorney James Ferguson, a law partner with Julius Chambers, announced his death during a news conference outside the firm's offices in Charlotte, N.C. on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013. Chambe

    Posted: 8/3/2013 6:55:55 PM EST
    Attorney James Ferguson, a law partner with Julius Chambers, announced his death during a news conference outside the firm's offices in Charlotte, N.C. on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013. Chambers, whose practice was in the forefront of the civil rights movement in North Carolina, has died. He was 76. A statement issued by his law firm said Chambers died Friday, Aug. 2, 2013 after months of declining health. In 1964, Chambers opened a law practice that became the state's first integrated law firm. He and his partners won cases that shaped civil rights law, including Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education regarding school busing. (AP Photo/The Charlotte Observer, John D. Simmons)
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              Attorneys James Ferguson and Geraldine Sumter, law partners with Julius Chambers, announced his death during a news conference outside the firm's offices in Charlotte, N.C. on Saturday,

    Attorneys James Ferguson and Geraldine Sumter, law partners with Julius Chambers, announced his death during a news conference outside the firm's offices in Charlotte, N.C. on Saturday,

    Posted: 8/3/2013 6:55:55 PM EST
    Attorneys James Ferguson and Geraldine Sumter, law partners with Julius Chambers, announced his death during a news conference outside the firm's offices in Charlotte, N.C. on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013. Chambers, whose practice was in the forefront of the civil rights movement in North Carolina, has died. He was 76. A statement issued by his law firm said Chambers died Friday, Aug. 2, 2013 after months of declining health. In 1964, Chambers opened a law practice that became the state's first integrated law firm. He and his partners won cases that shaped civil rights law, including Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education regarding school busing. (AP Photo/The Charlotte Observer, John D. Simmons)
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              Attorneys Geraldine Sumter and James Ferguson, law partners with Julius Chambers, announced his passing to the media outside the firm's offices in Charlotte, N.C. on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2

    Attorneys Geraldine Sumter and James Ferguson, law partners with Julius Chambers, announced his passing to the media outside the firm's offices in Charlotte, N.C. on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2

    Posted: 8/3/2013 6:55:55 PM EST
    Attorneys Geraldine Sumter and James Ferguson, law partners with Julius Chambers, announced his passing to the media outside the firm's offices in Charlotte, N.C. on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013. Chambers, whose practice was in the forefront of the civil rights movement in North Carolina, has died. He was 76. A statement issued Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 by his law firm said Chambers died Friday, Aug. 2, 2013 after months of declining health. In 1964, Chambers opened a law practice that became the state's first integrated law firm. He and his partners won cases that shaped civil rights law, including Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education regarding school busing. (AP Photo/The Charlotte Observer, John D. Simmons)
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              FILE - This Tuesday, Jan. 21, 1975 file photo shows Julius L. Chambers, newly elected president of the NAACP legal Defense Fund, in New York. Chambers, a Charlotte attorney whose practi

    FILE - This Tuesday, Jan. 21, 1975 file photo shows Julius L. Chambers, newly elected president of the NAACP legal Defense Fund, in New York. Chambers, a Charlotte attorney whose practi

    Posted: 8/3/2013 6:55:55 PM EST
    FILE - This Tuesday, Jan. 21, 1975 file photo shows Julius L. Chambers, newly elected president of the NAACP legal Defense Fund, in New York. Chambers, a Charlotte attorney whose practice was in the forefront of the civil rights movement in North Carolina, has died. He was 76. A statement issued Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 by his law firm said Chambers died Friday, Aug. 2, 2013 after months of declining health. In 1964, Chambers opened a law practice that became the state's first integrated law firm. He and his partners won cases that shaped civil rights law, including Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education regarding school busing. (AP Photo)
  •  - Members of the Readington Township Board of Education listen to a parent during a school board meeting in Readington Township, New Jersey

    Members of the Readington Township Board of Education listen to a parent during a school board meeting in Readington Township, New Jersey

    Posted: 4/23/2013 10:22:45 PM EST
    Members of the Readington Township Board of Education listen to a parent during a school board meeting in Readington Township, New Jersey, April 23, 2013. A New Jersey principal's ban on strapless dresses at a junior high school dance because they would be "distracting" to boys has enraged parents, who called on Tuesday for its reversal on the grounds it violates their daughters' constitutional rights. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz
  •  - Student Nijenhuis speaks in front of schoolmates Lachenmayr, Rieche, Damico and Fielo as they attend a Readington Township Board of Education meeting in Readington Township, New Jersey

    Student Nijenhuis speaks in front of schoolmates Lachenmayr, Rieche, Damico and Fielo as they attend a Readington Township Board of Education meeting in Readington Township, New Jersey

    Posted: 4/23/2013 10:22:45 PM EST
    Student Claudine Nijenhuis, 14, speaks in front of schoolmates Sarah Lachenmayr (2nd L), Samantha Rieche (3rd L), Louisa Damico (2nd R) and Hannah Fielo (R) as they attend a Readington Township Board of Education meeting in Readington Township, New Jersey, April 23, 2013. A New Jersey principal's ban on strapless dresses at a junior high school dance because they would be "distracting" to boys has enraged parents, who called on Tuesday for its reversal on the grounds it violates their daughters' constitutional rights. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz
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              Parents protest outside the home of Chicago's Board of Education President David Vitale’s house Thursday, March 21, 2013, in Chicago. Teachers say the city of Chicago has begun informin

    Parents protest outside the home of Chicago's Board of Education President David Vitale’s house Thursday, March 21, 2013, in Chicago. Teachers say the city of Chicago has begun informin

    Posted: 3/22/2013 3:13:31 AM EST
    Parents protest outside the home of Chicago's Board of Education President David Vitale’s house Thursday, March 21, 2013, in Chicago. Teachers say the city of Chicago has begun informing teachers, principals and local officials about which public schools it intends to close under a contentious plan that opponents say will disproportionately affect minority students in the nation's third largest school district. Chicago Public Schools hasn't said how many schools or students will be affected, but administrators identified up to 129 schools that could be shuttered, saying many serve too few students to justify remaining open. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
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              Parents protest outside the home of Chicago's Board of Education President David Vitale’s house Thursday, March 21, 2013, in Chicago. Teachers say the city of Chicago has begun informin

    Parents protest outside the home of Chicago's Board of Education President David Vitale’s house Thursday, March 21, 2013, in Chicago. Teachers say the city of Chicago has begun informin

    Posted: 3/21/2013 6:13:37 PM EST
    Parents protest outside the home of Chicago's Board of Education President David Vitale’s house Thursday, March 21, 2013, in Chicago. Teachers say the city of Chicago has begun informing teachers, principals and local officials about which public schools it intends to close under a contentious plan that opponents say will disproportionately affect minority students in the nation's third largest school district. Chicago Public Schools hasn't said how many schools or students will be affected, but administrators identified up to 129 schools that could be shuttered, saying many serve too few students to justify remaining open. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
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              Parents protest outside the home of Chicago's Board of Education President David Vitale’s house Thursday, March 21, 2013, in Chicago. Teachers say the city of Chicago has begun informin

    Parents protest outside the home of Chicago's Board of Education President David Vitale’s house Thursday, March 21, 2013, in Chicago. Teachers say the city of Chicago has begun informin

    Posted: 3/21/2013 6:13:37 PM EST
    Parents protest outside the home of Chicago's Board of Education President David Vitale’s house Thursday, March 21, 2013, in Chicago. Teachers say the city of Chicago has begun informing teachers, principals and local officials about which public schools it intends to close under a contentious plan that opponents say will disproportionately affect minority students in the nation's third largest school district. Chicago Public Schools hasn't said how many schools or students will be affected, but administrators identified up to 129 schools that could be shuttered, saying many serve too few students to justify remaining open. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
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              Parents protest outside the home of Chicago's Board of Education President David Vitale’s house Thursday, March 21, 2013, in Chicago. Teachers say the city of Chicago has begun informin

    Parents protest outside the home of Chicago's Board of Education President David Vitale’s house Thursday, March 21, 2013, in Chicago. Teachers say the city of Chicago has begun informin

    Posted: 3/21/2013 2:28:52 PM EST
    Parents protest outside the home of Chicago's Board of Education President David Vitale’s house Thursday, March 21, 2013, in Chicago. Teachers say the city of Chicago has begun informing teachers, principals and local officials about which public schools it intends to close under a contentious plan that opponents say will disproportionately affect minority students in the nation's third largest school district. Chicago Public Schools hasn't said how many schools or students will be affected, but administrators identified up to 129 schools that could be shuttered, saying many serve too few students to justify remaining open. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
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              With friends and family watching, Reba Williams, 106, receives her high school diploma from Mount Vernon Schools Superintendent Steve Short (not shown) at her home in Columbus, Ohio, on

    With friends and family watching, Reba Williams, 106, receives her high school diploma from Mount Vernon Schools Superintendent Steve Short (not shown) at her home in Columbus, Ohio, on

    Posted: 3/14/2013 10:03:22 AM EST
    With friends and family watching, Reba Williams, 106, receives her high school diploma from Mount Vernon Schools Superintendent Steve Short (not shown) at her home in Columbus, Ohio, on Wednesday, March 13, 2013. Williams said she completed high school in Ohio but was denied her diploma because she refused to read a final book assigned by a teacher. She'd read it once and didn't want to read it again. The Mount Vernon Board of Education approved issuing Williams' diploma earlier this month. A retired English teacher had approached the board about giving Williams the diploma after reading about her earlier this year. Williams says she hopes current students realize that learning is important. (AP Photo/News Journal, Dave Polcyn)
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              With friends and family watching, Reba Williams, 106, receives her high school diploma from Mount Vernon Schools Superintendent Steve Short (not shown) at her home in Columbus, Ohio, on

    With friends and family watching, Reba Williams, 106, receives her high school diploma from Mount Vernon Schools Superintendent Steve Short (not shown) at her home in Columbus, Ohio, on

    Posted: 3/14/2013 10:03:22 AM EST
    With friends and family watching, Reba Williams, 106, receives her high school diploma from Mount Vernon Schools Superintendent Steve Short (not shown) at her home in Columbus, Ohio, on Wednesday, March 13, 2013. Williams said she completed high school in Ohio but was denied her diploma because she refused to read a final book assigned by a teacher. She'd read it once and didn't want to read it again. The Mount Vernon Board of Education approved issuing Williams' diploma earlier this month. A retired English teacher had approached the board about giving Williams the diploma after reading about her earlier this year. Williams says she hopes current students realize that learning is important. (AP Photo/News Journal, Dave Polcyn)
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              With friends and family watching, Reba Williams, 106, receives her high school diploma from Mount Vernon Schools Superintendent Steve Short at her home in Columbus, Ohio, on Wednesday,

    With friends and family watching, Reba Williams, 106, receives her high school diploma from Mount Vernon Schools Superintendent Steve Short at her home in Columbus, Ohio, on Wednesday,

    Posted: 3/14/2013 10:03:22 AM EST
    With friends and family watching, Reba Williams, 106, receives her high school diploma from Mount Vernon Schools Superintendent Steve Short at her home in Columbus, Ohio, on Wednesday, March 13, 2013. Williams said she completed high school in Ohio but was denied her diploma because she refused to read a final book assigned by a teacher. She'd read it once and didn't want to read it again. The Mount Vernon Board of Education approved issuing Williams' diploma earlier this month. A retired English teacher had approached the board about giving Williams the diploma after reading about her earlier this year. Williams says she hopes current students realize that learning is important. (AP Photo/News Journal, Dave Polcyn)
  •  - Dale County Schools Superintendent Donny Bynum speaks to the media near Midland City

    Dale County Schools Superintendent Donny Bynum speaks to the media near Midland City

    Posted: 2/6/2013 9:27:48 AM EST
    Dale County Schools Superintendent Donny Bynum speaks to the media as Alabama State Board of Education Pupil Transportation Director Joe Lightsey (L) and Midland City Elementary School Principal Phillip Parker (R) listen near Midland City, Alabama, February 5, 2013. REUTERS/Phil Sears
  •  - Dale County Schools Superintendent Donny Bynum speaks to the media near Midland City

    Dale County Schools Superintendent Donny Bynum speaks to the media near Midland City

    Posted: 2/5/2013 2:45:53 PM EST
    Dale County Schools Superintendent Donny Bynum speaks to the media as Alabama State Board of Education Pupil Transportation Director Joe Lightsey (L) and Midland City Elementary School Principal Phillip Parker (R) listen near Midland City, Alabama, February 5, 2013. REUTERS/Phil Sears
  •  - An undated handout photo of school bus driver Charles Albert Poland Jr.

    An undated handout photo of school bus driver Charles Albert Poland Jr.

    Posted: 2/4/2013 5:55:31 PM EST
    An undated handout photo of school bus driver Charles Albert Poland Jr., provided by Dale County Board of Education in Ozark, Alabama January 30, 2013. Poland was fatally shot after a gunman boarded a bus ferrying more than 20 children home from school Tuesday, taking a 6-year old kindergarten student, fleeing the scene and is holed up in an underground bunker. REUTERS/Dale County Board of Eductation/Handout
  •  - An undated handout photo of school bus driver Charles Albert Poland Jr.

    An undated handout photo of school bus driver Charles Albert Poland Jr.

    Posted: 2/4/2013 5:55:31 PM EST
    An undated handout photo of school bus driver Charles Albert Poland Jr., provided by Dale County Board of Education in Ozark, Alabama January 30, 2013. Poland was fatally shot after a gunman boarded a bus ferrying more than 20 children home from school Tuesday, taking a 6-year old kindergarten student, fleeing the scene and is holed up in an underground bunker. REUTERS/Dale County Board of Eductation/Handout
  •  - An undated handout photo of school bus driver Charles Albert Poland Jr.

    An undated handout photo of school bus driver Charles Albert Poland Jr.

    Posted: 2/4/2013 5:37:42 PM EST
    An undated handout photo of school bus driver Charles Albert Poland Jr., provided by Dale County Board of Education in Ozark, Alabama January 30, 2013. Poland was fatally shot after a gunman boarded a bus ferrying more than 20 children home from school Tuesday, taking a 6-year old kindergarten student, fleeing the scene and is holed up in an underground bunker. REUTERS/Dale County Board of Eductation/Handout
  •  - An undated handout photo of school bus driver Charles Albert Poland Jr.

    An undated handout photo of school bus driver Charles Albert Poland Jr.

    Posted: 1/31/2013 1:56:46 PM EST
    An undated handout photo of school bus driver Charles Albert Poland Jr., provided by Dale County Board of Education in Ozark, Alabama January 30, 2013. Poland was fatally shot after a gunman boarded a bus ferrying more than 20 children home from school Tuesday, taking a 6-year old kindergarten student, fleeing the scene and is holed up in an underground bunker. REUTERS/Dale County Board of Eductation/Handout
  •  - An undated handout photo of school bus driver Charles Albert Poland Jr.

    An undated handout photo of school bus driver Charles Albert Poland Jr.

    Posted: 1/30/2013 10:30:31 PM EST
    An undated handout photo of school bus driver Charles Albert Poland Jr., provided by Dale County Board of Education in Ozark, Alabama January 30, 2013. REUTERS/Dale County Board of Eductation/Handout


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