Black Community Photos on Townhall

  •  - 
              FILE - This undated publicity file image released by The Weinstein Company shows, from left, Christoph Waltz as Schultz and Jamie Foxx as Django in the film "Django Unchained," directed

    FILE - This undated publicity file image released by The Weinstein Company shows, from left, Christoph Waltz as Schultz and Jamie Foxx as Django in the film "Django Unchained," directed

    Posted: 1/8/2013 12:58:28 PM EST
    FILE - This undated publicity file image released by The Weinstein Company shows, from left, Christoph Waltz as Schultz and Jamie Foxx as Django in the film "Django Unchained," directed by Quentin Tarantino. A line of action figures of the movie's main characters are currently on sale online, made by toy-maker NECA in partnership with the Weinstein Co. On Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2013, Najee Ali, director of the advocacy group Project Islamic Hope, will hold a press conference with other Los Angeles black community leaders calling for the removal of the toys from the market. (AP Photo/The Weinstein Company, Andrew Cooper, SMPSP, File)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this May 5, 2012 file photo, singer Mary J Blige arrives for the 138th Kentucky Derby horse race at Churchill Downs, in Louisville, Ky. Blige says the Burger King commercial t

    FILE - In this May 5, 2012 file photo, singer Mary J Blige arrives for the 138th Kentucky Derby horse race at Churchill Downs, in Louisville, Ky. Blige says the Burger King commercial t

    Posted: 6/29/2012 1:23:19 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 5, 2012 file photo, singer Mary J Blige arrives for the 138th Kentucky Derby horse race at Churchill Downs, in Louisville, Ky. Blige says the Burger King commercial that caused major backlash for the singer was a “mistake.” The clip was released in April and featured Blige singing about the fast-food chain's new chicken snack wraps. It immediately went viral, and some in the black community said it was stereotypical. Burger King pulled it after one day and said it was unfinished. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 6/14/2012 9:05:48 PM EST
    Chad Holley, center, is transported from the Harris County Courthouse Annex 1, at 16715 Clay, Wednesday, June 13, 2012, in Houston. Holley and three others were detained Wednesday afternoon. The Harris County Sheriff's Office says the 18-year-old Holley is charged with burglary of a habitation. Holley was 15 when videotape of his arrest on another burglary case drew fierce public criticism. The March 2010 videotape shows Holley on the ground surrounded by at least five police officers who appear to hit and kick his head, abdomen and legs. While black community leaders accused the officers of police brutality, several officers say Holley was resisting arrest. (AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Nick de la Torre) MANDATORY CREDIT
  •  -
    Posted: 6/14/2012 9:05:47 PM EST
    Chad Holley, center, is transported from the Harris County Courthouse Annex 1, Wednesday, June 13, 2012, in Houston. Holley and three others were detained Wednesday afternoon. The Harris County Sheriff's Office says the 18-year-old Holley is charged with burglary of a habitation. Holley was 15 when videotape of his arrest on another burglary case drew fierce public criticism. The March 2010 videotape shows Holley on the ground surrounded by at least five police officers who appear to hit and kick his head, abdomen and legs. While black community leaders accused the officers of police brutality, several officers say Holley was resisting arrest. (AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Nick de la Torre) MANDATORY CREDIT
  •  -
    Posted: 6/10/2012 12:00:57 PM EST
    Tourists visit the Ebenezer Baptist Church where Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. preached on Auburn Avenue, Friday, June 8, 2012, in Atlanta. Today Auburn Avenue is a shell of its former self, the bustling mix of banks, night clubs, churches, meat markets and funeral homes long gone, replaced with crumbling facades and cracked sidewalks. Hundreds of thousands of people still flock to Auburn Avenue to see King's birth home, the church where he preached and the crypt where he and his wife, Coretta, are buried. But tourists have little reason to linger. While King's legacy has been preserved, Auburn Avenue's business community has never recovered from the exodus of the black community that supported it. This week, the area was placed on the National Register of Historic Places' 11 Most Endangered list for the second time since 1992 in hopes of spurring preservation-oriented development. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -
    Posted: 6/10/2012 12:00:57 PM EST
    National Park Rangers stand outside the original Atlanta Life Insurance Company building on Auburn Avenue, dating back to 1905, Wednesday, June 6, 2012, in Atlanta. Today Auburn Avenue is a shell of its former self, the bustling mix of banks, night clubs, churches, meat markets and funeral homes long gone, replaced with crumbling facades and cracked sidewalks. Hundreds of thousands of people still flock to Auburn Avenue to see King's birth home, the church where he preached and the crypt where he and his wife, Coretta, are buried. But tourists have little reason to linger. While King's legacy has been preserved, Auburn Avenue's business community has never recovered from the exodus of the black community that supported it. This week, the area was placed on the National Register of Historic Places' 11 Most Endangered list for the second time since 1992 in hopes of spurring preservation-oriented development. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -
    Posted: 6/10/2012 12:00:57 PM EST
    A man walks under the Interstate 75/85 overpass whose construction cut the Auburn neighborhood in half, Saturday, June 9, 2012, in Atlanta. Today Auburn Avenue is a shell of its former self, the bustling mix of banks, night clubs, churches, meat markets and funeral homes long gone, replaced with crumbling facades and cracked sidewalks. Hundreds of thousands of people still flock to Auburn Avenue to see King's birth home, the church where he preached and the crypt where he and his wife, Coretta, are buried. But tourists have little reason to linger. While King's legacy has been preserved, Auburn Avenue's business community has never recovered from the exodus of the black community that supported it. This week, the area was placed on the National Register of Historic Places' 11 Most Endangered list for the second time since 1992 in hopes of spurring preservation-oriented development. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -
    Posted: 6/10/2012 12:00:56 PM EST
    The residential portion of the Sweet Auburn Historic District, including the home where Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was born at rear right, is seen Wednesday, June 6, 2012, in Atlanta. Today Auburn Avenue is a shell of its former self, the bustling mix of banks, night clubs, churches, meat markets and funeral homes long gone, replaced with crumbling facades and cracked sidewalks. Hundreds of thousands of people still flock to Auburn Avenue to see King's birth home, the church where he preached and the crypt where he and his wife, Coretta, are buried. But tourists have little reason to linger. While King's legacy has been preserved, Auburn Avenue's business community has never recovered from the exodus of the black community that supported it. This week, the area was placed on the National Register of Historic Places' 11 Most Endangered list for the second time since 1992 in hopes of spurring preservation-oriented development. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -
    Posted: 6/10/2012 12:00:56 PM EST
    The historic Big Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, started in 1847 for slaves by their slave holders, stands along Auburn Avenue Wednesday, June 6, 2012, in Atlanta. Today Auburn Avenue is a shell of its former self, the bustling mix of banks, night clubs, churches, meat markets and funeral homes long gone, replaced with crumbling facades and cracked sidewalks. Hundreds of thousands of people still flock to Auburn Avenue to see King's birth home, the church where he preached and the crypt where he and his wife, Coretta, are buried. But tourists have little reason to linger. While King's legacy has been preserved, Auburn Avenue's business community has never recovered from the exodus of the black community that supported it. This week, the area was placed on the National Register of Historic Places' 11 Most Endangered list for the second time since 1992 in hopes of spurring preservation-oriented development. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -
    Posted: 6/10/2012 12:00:56 PM EST
    A man walks down the street after asking club goers for spare change in the Auburn Avenue district, Saturday, June 9, 2012, in Atlanta. Today Auburn Avenue is a shell of its former self, the bustling mix of banks, night clubs, churches, meat markets and funeral homes long gone, replaced with crumbling facades and cracked sidewalks. Hundreds of thousands of people still flock to Auburn Avenue to see King's birth home, the church where he preached and the crypt where he and his wife, Coretta, are buried. But tourists have little reason to linger. While King's legacy has been preserved, Auburn Avenue's business community has never recovered from the exodus of the black community that supported it. This week, the area was placed on the National Register of Historic Places' 11 Most Endangered list for the second time since 1992 in hopes of spurring preservation-oriented development. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -
    Posted: 6/10/2012 12:00:56 PM EST
    A man pushes a stroller across Auburn Avenue, Thursday, June 7, 2012, in Atlanta. Today Auburn Avenue is a shell of its former self, the bustling mix of banks, night clubs, churches, meat markets and funeral homes long gone, replaced with crumbling facades and cracked sidewalks. Hundreds of thousands of people still flock to Auburn Avenue to see King's birth home, the church where he preached and the crypt where he and his wife, Coretta, are buried. But tourists have little reason to linger. While King's legacy has been preserved, Auburn Avenue's business community has never recovered from the exodus of the black community that supported it. This week, the area was placed on the National Register of Historic Places' 11 Most Endangered list for the second time since 1992 in hopes of spurring preservation-oriented development. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/5/2012 3:20:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 15, 2012 file photo, singer Mary J. Blige arrives at the 69th Annual Golden Globe Awards in Los Angeles. A criticized Burger King commercial featuring Mary J. Blige singing about chicken has been pulled, but the fast-food chain is blaming licensing issues for the decision. In it, Blige sings passionately about the ingredients in the chicken snack wraps. But as the video went viral, some in the black community criticized the ad as stereotypical. The black women-oriented website Madame Noire likened it to ?buffoonery.? Burger King said Tuesday the commercial was pulled because of a music licensing concern and that they hope to have the Blige ?ads back on the air soon.? (AP Photo/Matt Sayles, file)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/5/2012 3:20:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 15, 2012 file photo, singer Mary J. Blige arrives at the 69th Annual Golden Globe Awards in Los Angeles. A criticized Burger King commercial featuring Mary J. Blige singing about chicken has been pulled, but the fast-food chain is blaming licensing issues for the decision. In it, Blige sings passionately about the ingredients in the chicken snack wraps. But as the video went viral, some in the black community criticized the ad as stereotypical. The black women-oriented website Madame Noire likened it to ?buffoonery.? Burger King said Tuesday the commercial was pulled because of a music licensing concern and that they hope to have the Blige ?ads back on the air soon.? (AP Photo/Matt Sayles, file)
  •  -
    Posted: 3/27/2012 3:45:46 PM EST
    In this March 1, 2012 photo, Carolyn Cline holds a copy of a 100-year-old map and photographs near the site where the black community once lived in Harrison, Ark. The area is now a highway intersection. In 1905, a mob ran most black people out of tiny Harrison, Ark. More than a century later, only 34 of the nearly 13, 000 residents in Harrison are black. But the town desperately wants to overcome its past, and hopes that a better image will attract more residents and businesses. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston)
  •  -
    Posted: 8/13/2011 3:31:21 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 6, 2011 file photo, Mayor Michael Nutter makes remarks during an interview with The Associated Press in Philadelphia. In bluntly calling out the black community as part of his crackdown on violent flash mobs, Nutter finds himself the latest in a long line of African-American leaders to use such a tough love approach in response to civic problems. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
  •  - Participants in the "10,000 Men: It's a New Day" initiative walk through a neighborhood in south Philadelphia

    Participants in the "10,000 Men: It's a New Day" initiative walk through a neighborhood in south Philadelphia

    Posted: 11/27/2007 11:12:20 PM EST
    Participants in the "10,000 Men: It's a New Day" initiative walk through a neighborhood on the first night of their patrols in south Philadelphia November 27, 2007. Philadelphia's black community on Tuesday launched civilian street patrols aimed at curbing the highest murder rate among major American cities. In an experiment being watched by at least five other U.S. cities, 32 men in two groups spent the early evening hours walking the streets of South Philadelphia to deter street crime in one of the city's most dangerous areas. REUTERS/Tim Shaffer (UNITED STATES)