Birth Control Photos on Townhall

  •  - Women lie on beds with their newborn babies inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Women lie on beds with their newborn babies inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:39:13 AM EST
    Women lie on beds with their newborn babies inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - A baby is being fed through a dropper inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    A baby is being fed through a dropper inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:37:32 AM EST
    A baby is being fed through a dropper inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - A baby lies on the scale of a weighing machine inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    A baby lies on the scale of a weighing machine inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:36:45 AM EST
    A baby lies on the scale of a weighing machine inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - A newborn baby cries after being delivered inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    A newborn baby cries after being delivered inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:35:43 AM EST
    A newborn baby cries after being delivered inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Medical staff surround woman who is about to give birth inside maternity ward of Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Medical staff surround woman who is about to give birth inside maternity ward of Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:34:21 AM EST
    Medical staff surround a woman who is about to give birth inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - A woman about to give birth is wheeled into the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    A woman about to give birth is wheeled into the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:33:16 AM EST
    A woman about to give birth is wheeled into the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Medical staff assists woman as she prepares to give birth inside maternity ward of Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Medical staff assists woman as she prepares to give birth inside maternity ward of Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:32:05 AM EST
    A medical staff assists a woman as she prepares to give birth inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Ultrasound scans are pictured near a woman during a pre-natal check at the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Ultrasound scans are pictured near a woman during a pre-natal check at the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:28:30 AM EST
    Ultrasound scans are pictured near a woman during a pre-natal check at the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 6, 2011. The maternity ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Medical staff assist a woman as she prepares to give birth inside maternity ward of Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Medical staff assist a woman as she prepares to give birth inside maternity ward of Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:25:27 AM EST
    Medical staff assist a woman as she prepares to give birth inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Women breastfeed their newborn babies inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Women breastfeed their newborn babies inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:23:03 AM EST
    Women breastfeed their newborn babies inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/ Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Babies lie on a bed inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Babies lie on a bed inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:21:55 AM EST
    Babies lie on a bed inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Women share beds as they rest inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Women share beds as they rest inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:19:36 AM EST
    Women share beds as they rest inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Women stand in a line to get their weights measured during a pre-natal check at the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Women stand in a line to get their weights measured during a pre-natal check at the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:15:44 AM EST
    Women stand in a line to get their weights measured during a pre-natal check at the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 6, 2011. The maternity ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
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    Posted: 5/18/2011 9:11:02 AM EST
    A group of children play along the hallway of a government housing project Wednesday, May 18, 2011 in Manila, Philippines. After simmering for months, a wide-ranging and acrimonious debate over government-funded access to contraceptives in the Philippines has entered the country's Congress. The issue pits the powerful and conservative Catholic establishment, which says contraceptives are as sinful as abortions, against reformers who want more openness about condoms and other birth control in the impoverished Southeast Asian nation to slow population growth and help prevent disease. (AP Photo/Pat Roque)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/18/2011 9:11:00 AM EST
    Annacorita Moramion, right, a mother of nine children, watch her children sharing food among each other Wednesday, May 18, 2011 in Manila, Philippines. After simmering for months, a wide-ranging and acrimonious debate over government-funded access to contraceptives in the Philippines has entered the country's Congress. The issue pits the powerful and conservative Catholic establishment, which says contraceptives are as sinful as abortions, against reformers who want more openness about condoms and other birth control in the impoverished Southeast Asian nation to slow population growth and help prevent disease. Moramion supports the reproductive health bill. (AP Photo/Pat Roque)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/18/2011 9:10:59 AM EST
    A woman cuddles her baby as she talks to other woman outside their house where she put up a sign against the artificial birth control Wednesday, May 18, 2011 in Manila, Philippines. After simmering for months, a wide-ranging and acrimonious debate over government-funded access to contraceptives in the Philippines has entered the country's Congress. The issue pits the powerful and conservative Catholic establishment, which says contraceptives are as sinful as abortions, against reformers who want more openness about condoms and other birth control in the impoverished Southeast Asian nation to slow population growth and help prevent disease. (AP Photo/Pat Roque)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/18/2011 9:10:59 AM EST
    A sign opposing the reproductive health bill is displayed outside the Manila Cathedra Wednesday, May 18, 2011 in Manila, Philippines. After simmering for months, a wide-ranging and acrimonious debate over government-funded access to contraceptives in the Philippines has entered the country's Congress. The issue pits the powerful and conservative Catholic establishment, which says contraceptives are as sinful as abortions, against reformers who want more openness about condoms and other birth control in the impoverished Southeast Asian nation to slow population growth and help prevent disease. (AP Photo/Pat Roque)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/18/2011 9:10:59 AM EST
    In this April 17, 2011 photo released by Malacanang Palace, Philippine President Benigno Aquino III listens to speeches during graduation rites at the University of the Philippines at suburban Quezon, Philippines. After simmering for months, an acrimonious debate over the Reproductive Health Bill has entered Philippine Congress with a strong backing from Aquino III, who in his speech before the country's graduates, he is backing artificial birth control even if it means going against the dominant Catholic church and if necessary, risk excommunication. (AP Photo/Malacanang Palace, Jay Morales) NO SALES, EDITORIAL USE ONLY
  •  - Macaque monkeys sit on the ledge of a building in the town of Lopburi

    Macaque monkeys sit on the ledge of a building in the town of Lopburi

    Posted: 8/20/2009 2:54:13 AM EST
    REFILE - ADDING SPECIES Macaque monkeys sit on the ledge of a building in the town of Lopburi, 155 km (96 miles) north of Bangkok, August 19, 2009. Thailand started a birth control programme to sterilise male monkeys with the aim of controlling their population in the famous monkey town of Lopburi. The programme took place after many villagers complained about the increasing numbers of monkeys and their aggressive attacks on people. Picture taken August 19, 2009. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom (THAILAND ANIMALS HEALTH)
  •  - Monkey sit in a row in the town of Lopburi

    Monkey sit in a row in the town of Lopburi

    Posted: 8/20/2009 2:47:06 AM EST
    Monkey sit in a row in the town of Lopburi, 155 km (96 miles) north of Bangkok, August 19, 2009. Thailand started a birth control programme to sterilise male monkeys with the aim of controlling their population in the famous monkey town of Lopburi. The programme took place after many villagers complained about the increasing numbers of monkeys and their aggressive attacks on people. Picture taken August 19, 2009. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom (THAILAND ANIMALS HEALTH)