Birth Control Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 2/9/2012 12:05:48 AM EST
    Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H. speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2012, to criticize President Barack Obama for insisting that employers must provide health insurance that includes birth control for women. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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    Posted: 2/9/2012 12:05:48 AM EST
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. right, accompanied by Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2012, to criticize President Barack Obama for insisting that employers must provide health insurance that includes birth control for women. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
  •  - File photo of Nancy Brinker at the White House in Washington

    File photo of Nancy Brinker at the White House in Washington

    Posted: 2/3/2012 1:35:19 PM EST
    Susan G. Komen for the Cure founder Nancy Brinker visits the White House in Washington in this June 14, 2004 file photo. Susan G. Komen for the Cure said on February 3, 2012 it was retreating from a decision to cut funding to Planned Parenthood, which provides abortion and birth control services, and apologized for a move that thrust the world's largest breast cancer charity into a deeply politicized controversy. REUTERS/Mannie Garcia (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS)
  •  - File photo of Nancy Brinker at the White House in Washington

    File photo of Nancy Brinker at the White House in Washington

    Posted: 2/3/2012 11:56:18 AM EST
    Susan G. Komen for the Cure founder Nancy Brinker visits the White House in Washington in this June 14, 2004 file photo. Susan G. Komen for the Cure said on February 3, 2012 it was retreating from a decision to cut funding to Planned Parenthood, which provides abortion and birth control services, and apologized for a move that thrust the world's largest breast cancer charity into a deeply politicized controversy. REUTERS/REUTERS/Mannie Garcia (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS)
  •  - File photo of Susan G. Komen for the Cure Nancy Brinker in Washington

    File photo of Susan G. Komen for the Cure Nancy Brinker in Washington

    Posted: 2/3/2012 11:43:44 AM EST
    Susan G. Komen for the Cure Nancy Brinker (C) attends a dinner at the White House in Washington in this March 30, 2011 file photo. Susan G. Komen for the Cure said on February 3, 2012 it was retreating from a decision to cut funding to Planned Parenthood, which provides abortion and birth control services, and apologized for a move that thrust the world's largest breast cancer charity into a deeply politicized controversy. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH)
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    Posted: 2/2/2012 1:20:45 AM EST
    FILE - In this April 12, 2005 file photo, the world headquarters of Pfizer Inc. is seen in New York. Pfizer Inc. is recalling 1 million packets of birth control pills due to a packaging error that could raise the risk of an accidental pregnancy by leaving women with an inadequate dose, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
  •  - Handout photo shows packaging and samples of Lo/Ovral-28 (norgestrel and ethinyl estradiol) birth control tablets

    Handout photo shows packaging and samples of Lo/Ovral-28 (norgestrel and ethinyl estradiol) birth control tablets

    Posted: 2/1/2012 2:58:48 PM EST
    Packaging and samples of Lo/Ovral-28 (norgestrel and ethinyl estradiol) birth control tablets are seen in a photo released by the FDA, January 31, 2012. REUTERS/FDA
  •  - Handout photo shows packaging and samples of Norgestrel and Ethinyl Estradiol birth control tablets

    Handout photo shows packaging and samples of Norgestrel and Ethinyl Estradiol birth control tablets

    Posted: 2/1/2012 2:44:44 PM EST
    Packaging and samples of Norgestrel and Ethinyl Estradiol birth control tablets are seen in this handout photo released by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) January 31, 2012. Pfizer Inc said on Tuesday it was recalling about 1 million packets of birth control pills in the United States because they may not contain enough contraceptive to prevent pregnancy. Pfizer said the birth control pills posed no health threat to women but it urged consumers affected by the recall to "begin using a non-hormonal form of contraception immediately." REUTERS/U.S. FDA/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: DRUGS SOCIETY HEALTH) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  - Handout photo shows packaging and samples of Lo/Ovral-28 (norgestrel and ethinyl estradiol) birth control tablets

    Handout photo shows packaging and samples of Lo/Ovral-28 (norgestrel and ethinyl estradiol) birth control tablets

    Posted: 2/1/2012 2:43:08 PM EST
    Packaging and samples of Lo/Ovral-28 (norgestrel and ethinyl estradiol) birth control tablets are seen in this handout photo released by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) January 31, 2012. Pfizer Inc said on Tuesday it was recalling about 1 million packets of birth control pills in the United States because they may not contain enough contraceptive to prevent pregnancy. Pfizer said the birth control pills posed no health threat to women but it urged consumers affected by the recall to "begin using a non-hormonal form of contraception immediately." REUTERS/U.S. FDA/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: DRUGS SOCIETY HEALTH BUSINESS) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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    Posted: 11/17/2011 6:15:45 PM EST
    FILE - In this Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2009 file photo, Nurse Jozie Kovar, checks the heartbeat of one of eight babies at Jamestown, N.D. Hospital. Birth rates for the nation's youngest mothers hit new lows in 2011 - further evidence that few forms of birth control are as effective as the economy. The national birth rate dropped for the third straight year, with declines for most ages and all races, according to a federal report released Thursday, Nov. 17, 2011. (AP Photo/The Jamestown Sun, John M. Steiner)
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    Posted: 8/8/2011 3:30:48 AM EST
    FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Catholic Health Association of the United States shows Sr. Carol Keehan, president of the Catholic Health Association of the United States, the 600-member umbrella group for Catholic hospitals. Catholic hospitals are dismayed President Barack Obama's health care legislation may force them to cover birth control free of charge to their employees. "I call this the parish housekeeper exemption ? that's about all it covers," Sister Carol said. "What we are trying to do is make workable the conscience protection the administration says it is willing to give," she said. (AP Photo/The Catholic Health Association of the United States, File)
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    Posted: 8/7/2011 11:50:46 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 21, 2011 file photo, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius speaks at the White House in Washington. Health insurance plans must cover birth control as preventive care for women, with no copays, the Obama administration said Monday in a decision with far-reaching implications for health care as well as social mores. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
  •  - Members of PETA Asia dressed as condoms distribute leaflets on animal birth control in Shanghai

    Members of PETA Asia dressed as condoms distribute leaflets on animal birth control in Shanghai

    Posted: 6/9/2011 11:42:43 PM EST
    Members of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) Asia dressed as condoms distribute leaflets on animal birth control in Shanghai June 10, 2011. The sign reads: "Cats and dogs are unable to practise birth control. Please neuter them". REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY)
  •  - A member of PETA dressed as a condom holds a sign while promoting animal birth control in Shanghai

    A member of PETA dressed as a condom holds a sign while promoting animal birth control in Shanghai

    Posted: 6/9/2011 11:39:03 PM EST
    A member of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) dressed as a condom holds a sign while promoting animal birth control in Shanghai June 10, 2011. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY)
  •  - A white board showing different statistics hangs at the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    A white board showing different statistics hangs at the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:49:44 AM EST
    A white board showing different statistics hangs at the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 6, 2011. The maternity ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Women breastfeed their newborn babies inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Women breastfeed their newborn babies inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:45:04 AM EST
    Women breastfeed their newborn babies inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/ Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - A general view shows inside the crowded maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    A general view shows inside the crowded maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:44:02 AM EST
    A general view shows inside the crowded maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Women are pictured near their newborn babies inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Women are pictured near their newborn babies inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:43:01 AM EST
    Women are pictured near their newborn babies inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Newborn babies lie on a bed inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Newborn babies lie on a bed inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:41:54 AM EST
    Newborn babies lie on a bed inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - A woman breastfeeds her newborn baby inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    A woman breastfeeds her newborn baby inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila

    Posted: 6/6/2011 6:40:08 AM EST
    A woman breastfeeds her newborn baby inside the maternity ward of the government run Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila June 1, 2011. The ward, the busiest in the country, sees an average of 60 births a day. The Philippines' population growth rate of around 2.0 percent is above Southeast Asia's average of around 1.7 percent, with an estimated 200 babies born every hour. Lack of a national policy on birth control and access to modern family planning methods -- frowned upon by the powerful Catholic church -- are some of the factors that have led to the country's population ballooning to nearly 100 million, according to various government and private sector estimates, with the Philippines the second most populous nation in the region after Indonesia. Picture taken on June 1, 2011. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)