Big Government Photos on Townhall

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              This Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 photo shows a Virginia state and U.S. flag in front of the the train station in Appomattox, Va. Signs around town call it the place "where our nation reunite

    This Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 photo shows a Virginia state and U.S. flag in front of the the train station in Appomattox, Va. Signs around town call it the place "where our nation reunite

    Posted: 11/11/2012 8:13:22 AM EST
    This Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 photo shows a Virginia state and U.S. flag in front of the the train station in Appomattox, Va. Signs around town call it the place "where our nation reunited" as the Civil War came to an end. But listen to people here and all over the country, or look at exit polls from the election, and you confront deep division, polarization. Red or blue. Left or right. Big government or small. Tea party or Occupy. Ninety-nine percent or one. Employed or out-of-work. Citizen or non-citizen. Black or white or brown. (AP Photo/Pat Jarrett)
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              This Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 photo shows the McLean House, reconstructed on its original site in Appomattox, Va., where Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant arrived at the terms of surrend

    This Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 photo shows the McLean House, reconstructed on its original site in Appomattox, Va., where Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant arrived at the terms of surrend

    Posted: 11/11/2012 8:13:22 AM EST
    This Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 photo shows the McLean House, reconstructed on its original site in Appomattox, Va., where Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant arrived at the terms of surrender, marking the beginning of the end of the Civil War on Sunday, April 9, 1865. Signs around town call this the place "where our nation reunited" as the Civil War came to an end. But listen to people here and all over the country, or look at exit polls from the election, and you confront deep division, polarization. Red or blue. Left or right. Big government or small. Tea party or Occupy. Ninety-nine percent or one. Employed or out-of-work. Citizen or non-citizen. Black or white or brown. (AP Photo/Pat Jarrett)
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              This Nov. 8, 2012 photo shows a sign advertising the 150th anniversary of the Civil War outside Appomattox, Va. Signs around town call this the place "where our nation reunited" as the

    This Nov. 8, 2012 photo shows a sign advertising the 150th anniversary of the Civil War outside Appomattox, Va. Signs around town call this the place "where our nation reunited" as the

    Posted: 11/11/2012 8:13:22 AM EST
    This Nov. 8, 2012 photo shows a sign advertising the 150th anniversary of the Civil War outside Appomattox, Va. Signs around town call this the place "where our nation reunited" as the Civil War came to an end. But listen to people here and all over the country, or look at exit polls from the election, and you confront deep division, polarization. Red or blue. Left or right. Big government or small. Tea party or Occupy. Ninety-nine percent or one. Employed or out-of-work. Citizen or non-citizen. Black or white or brown. (AP Photo/Pat Jarrett)
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              This Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 photo shows the sun setting over Main Street in Appomattox, Va. Signs around town call it the place "where our nation reunited" as the Civil War came to an e

    This Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 photo shows the sun setting over Main Street in Appomattox, Va. Signs around town call it the place "where our nation reunited" as the Civil War came to an e

    Posted: 11/11/2012 8:13:22 AM EST
    This Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 photo shows the sun setting over Main Street in Appomattox, Va. Signs around town call it the place "where our nation reunited" as the Civil War came to an end. But listen to people here and all over the country, or look at exit polls from the election, and you confront deep division, polarization. Red or blue. Left or right. Big government or small. Tea party or Occupy. Ninety-nine percent or one. Employed or out-of-work. Citizen or non-citizen. Black or white or brown. (AP Photo/Pat Jarrett)
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              FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, various sunscreen products are seen in Washington.  When the Obama administration agreed to set the first-ever federal limits on runoff in Florid

    FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, various sunscreen products are seen in Washington. When the Obama administration agreed to set the first-ever federal limits on runoff in Florid

    Posted: 7/30/2012 12:53:52 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, various sunscreen products are seen in Washington. When the Obama administration agreed to set the first-ever federal limits on runoff in Florida, environmental groups thought the state’s waters would finally get clean from a nutrient overdose that spawns algal blooms, suffocates rivers, lakes and streams, and forms byproducts in drinking water that could make people sick. The Florida rule is one of a string of regulations delayed at federal agencies, or at the White House office responsible for reviewing new rules. Together, they highlight the administration’s cautiousness in an election year, where it has been increasingly under attack by Republicans and business groups for favoring big government and costly regulations that they allege kill jobs. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
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              This Feb. 2011 photo provided by the U.S. Chemical Safety Board shows a dust sample being taken at the Hoeganaes Corporation in Gallatin, Tenn., following an explosion earlier that mont

    This Feb. 2011 photo provided by the U.S. Chemical Safety Board shows a dust sample being taken at the Hoeganaes Corporation in Gallatin, Tenn., following an explosion earlier that mont

    Posted: 7/30/2012 12:53:52 PM EST
    This Feb. 2011 photo provided by the U.S. Chemical Safety Board shows a dust sample being taken at the Hoeganaes Corporation in Gallatin, Tenn., following an explosion earlier that month. When the Obama administration agreed to set the first-ever federal limits on runoff in Florida, environmental groups thought the state’s waters would finally get clean from a nutrient overdose that spawns algal blooms, suffocates rivers, lakes and streams, and forms byproducts in drinking water that could make people sick. The Florida rule is one of a string of regulations delayed at federal agencies, or at the White House office responsible for reviewing new rules. Together, they highlight the administration’s cautiousness in an election year, where it has been increasingly under attack by Republicans and business groups for favoring big government and costly regulations that they allege kill jobs. (AP Photo/U.S. Chemical Safety Board)
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              FILE - This Aug. 17, 2006 file photo shows the normally clear water of Blackwater Sound are seen as a dark greenish blue, in Key Largo, Fla. When the Obama administration agreed to set

    FILE - This Aug. 17, 2006 file photo shows the normally clear water of Blackwater Sound are seen as a dark greenish blue, in Key Largo, Fla. When the Obama administration agreed to set

    Posted: 7/30/2012 12:53:52 PM EST
    FILE - This Aug. 17, 2006 file photo shows the normally clear water of Blackwater Sound are seen as a dark greenish blue, in Key Largo, Fla. When the Obama administration agreed to set the first-ever federal limits on runoff in Florida, environmental groups thought the state’s waters would finally get clean from a nutrient overdose that spawns algal blooms, suffocates rivers, lakes and streams, and forms byproducts in drinking water that could make people sick. The Florida rule is one of a string of regulations delayed at federal agencies, or at the White House office responsible for reviewing new rules. Together, they highlight the administration’s cautiousness in an election year, where it has been increasingly under attack by Republicans and business groups for favoring big government and costly regulations that they allege kill jobs. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)
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              FILE - In this July 31, 2008 file photo, customers view the menu in the drive through line at a Burger King in Portland, Ore.  When the Obama administration agreed to set the first-ever

    FILE - In this July 31, 2008 file photo, customers view the menu in the drive through line at a Burger King in Portland, Ore. When the Obama administration agreed to set the first-ever

    Posted: 7/30/2012 12:53:51 PM EST
    FILE - In this July 31, 2008 file photo, customers view the menu in the drive through line at a Burger King in Portland, Ore. When the Obama administration agreed to set the first-ever federal limits on runoff in Florida, environmental groups thought the state’s waters would finally get clean from a nutrient overdose that spawns algal blooms, suffocates rivers, lakes and streams, and forms byproducts in drinking water that could make people sick. The Florida rule is one of a string of regulations delayed at federal agencies, or at the White House office responsible for reviewing new rules. Together, they highlight the administration’s cautiousness in an election year, where it has been increasingly under attack by Republicans and business groups for favoring big government and costly regulations that they allege kill jobs.. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)