Bailouts Photos on Townhall

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              In this Sunday, May 25, 2008 photo, Wayne Allyn Root and former Republican congressman Bob Barr talk to their supporters for the Libertarian Presidential nomination after Root gave his

    In this Sunday, May 25, 2008 photo, Wayne Allyn Root and former Republican congressman Bob Barr talk to their supporters for the Libertarian Presidential nomination after Root gave his

    Posted: 7/8/2012 7:28:41 PM EST
    In this Sunday, May 25, 2008 photo, Wayne Allyn Root and former Republican congressman Bob Barr talk to their supporters for the Libertarian Presidential nomination after Root gave his support for Barr at the Libertarian National Convention in Denver. The Libertarian Party picked the former Republican congressman from Georgia to be its presidential candidate after six rounds of balloting. Something's going on in America this election year: a renaissance of an ideal as old as the nation itself - that live-and-let-live, get-out-of-my-business, individualism vs. paternalism dogma that is the hallmark of libertarianism. But what looms are far larger questions about whether an America fed up with government bans and government bailouts - with government, period - is seeing a return to its libertarian roots. (AP Photo/Will Powers)
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              FILE - In this Friday, Feb. 17, 2012 file photo, Mackenzie DeRoyter of Spokane, Wash., center, and Hanna McCoy of Hawaii cheer for Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul while he sp

    FILE - In this Friday, Feb. 17, 2012 file photo, Mackenzie DeRoyter of Spokane, Wash., center, and Hanna McCoy of Hawaii cheer for Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul while he sp

    Posted: 7/8/2012 7:28:41 PM EST
    FILE - In this Friday, Feb. 17, 2012 file photo, Mackenzie DeRoyter of Spokane, Wash., center, and Hanna McCoy of Hawaii cheer for Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul while he speaks at the Student Union Building in Moscow, Idaho. Something's going on in America this election year: a renaissance of an ideal as old as the nation itself - that live-and-let-live, get-out-of-my-business, individualism vs. paternalism dogma that is the hallmark of libertarianism. But what looms are far larger questions about whether an America fed up with government bans and government bailouts - with government, period - is seeing a return to its libertarian roots. (AP Photo/Moscow-Pullman Daily News, Geoff Crimmins)
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              FILE - In this Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2011 file photo, former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson speaks at a news conference during which he announced he is leaving the Republican Party in favor

    FILE - In this Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2011 file photo, former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson speaks at a news conference during which he announced he is leaving the Republican Party in favor

    Posted: 7/8/2012 7:28:41 PM EST
    FILE - In this Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2011 file photo, former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson speaks at a news conference during which he announced he is leaving the Republican Party in favor of seeking a presidential nomination as a Libertarian, at the State Capitol in Santa Fe, N.M. Something's going on in America this election year: a renaissance of an ideal as old as the nation itself - that live-and-let-live, get-out-of-my-business, individualism vs. paternalism dogma that is the hallmark of libertarianism. But what looms are far larger questions about whether an America fed up with government bans and government bailouts - with government, period - is seeing a return to its libertarian roots. (AP Photo/Albuquerque Journal, Eddie Moore, File)
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              In this Saturday, May 5, 2012 photo, supporters of GOP presidential candidate Ron Paul chant his name during the Nevada Republican Party Convention in Sparks, Nev. Standing second right

    In this Saturday, May 5, 2012 photo, supporters of GOP presidential candidate Ron Paul chant his name during the Nevada Republican Party Convention in Sparks, Nev. Standing second right

    Posted: 7/8/2012 7:28:41 PM EST
    In this Saturday, May 5, 2012 photo, supporters of GOP presidential candidate Ron Paul chant his name during the Nevada Republican Party Convention in Sparks, Nev. Standing second right is Cindy Lake, acting chair of the Clark County Republican Party and a delegate to the upcoming Republican National Convention. Something's going on in America this election year: a renaissance of an ideal as old as the nation itself - that live-and-let-live, get-out-of-my-business, individualism vs. paternalism dogma that is the hallmark of libertarianism. But what looms are far larger questions about whether an America fed up with government bans and government bailouts - with government, period - is seeing a return to its libertarian roots. (AP Photo/Las Vegas Review-Journal, Cathleen Allison)
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              President of European Central Bank Mario Draghi speaks during a press conference in Frankfurt, Germany, Thursday, July 5, 2012. The European Central Bank has cut its key interest rate b

    President of European Central Bank Mario Draghi speaks during a press conference in Frankfurt, Germany, Thursday, July 5, 2012. The European Central Bank has cut its key interest rate b

    Posted: 7/5/2012 3:23:35 PM EST
    President of European Central Bank Mario Draghi speaks during a press conference in Frankfurt, Germany, Thursday, July 5, 2012. The European Central Bank has cut its key interest rate by a quarter percentage point to a record low of 0.75 percent to boost a eurozone economy weighed down by the continent's crisis over too much government debt. The move followed a rate cut by China's central bank and new stimulus measures by the Bank of England as global financial authorities seek to shore up a slowing global economy. European leaders last week agreed on new steps to strengthen market confidence in their shared euro currency bloc. They agreed to set up a single banking supervisor to keep bank bailouts from bankrupting countries and made it easier for troubled countries to get bailout help. Those steps helped calm financial markets, which have expected the ECB to follow up with more help in the form of a rate cut. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
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              President of European Central Bank Mario Draghi adjusts his glasses during a press conference in Frankfurt, Germany, Thursday, July 5, 2012. The European Central Bank has cut its key in

    President of European Central Bank Mario Draghi adjusts his glasses during a press conference in Frankfurt, Germany, Thursday, July 5, 2012. The European Central Bank has cut its key in

    Posted: 7/5/2012 3:23:35 PM EST
    President of European Central Bank Mario Draghi adjusts his glasses during a press conference in Frankfurt, Germany, Thursday, July 5, 2012. The European Central Bank has cut its key interest rate by a quarter percentage point to a record low of 0.75 percent to boost a eurozone economy weighed down by the continent's crisis over too much government debt. The move followed a rate cut by China's central bank and new stimulus measures by the Bank of England as global financial authorities seek to shore up a slowing global economy. European leaders last week agreed on new steps to strengthen market confidence in their shared euro currency bloc. They agreed to set up a single banking supervisor to keep bank bailouts from bankrupting countries and made it easier for troubled countries to get bailout help. Those steps helped calm financial markets, which have expected the ECB to follow up with more help in the form of a rate cut. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
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    Posted: 6/15/2012 12:00:49 PM EST
    An election banner of radical left-wing Syriza party reads '' No more bailouts and Troika" as a homeless person sleeps at the entrance of a building near Omonia square in Athens, Thursday, June 14, 2012. Greece faces crucial national elections on Sunday, that could ultimately determine whether the debt-saddled, recession bound country remains in the eurozone. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
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    Posted: 6/13/2012 12:05:45 PM EST
    In this June 7, 2012 photo, traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. For the third straight spring, fear about Europe?s debt crisis has rattled U.S. stocks. Investors are increasingly worried that Greece will exit the euro, and Spain may need an international bailout. The next date to watch is June 17, when Greece holds an election. If the far-left party wins, Greece may spurn the program of bailouts and steep budget cuts that has kept it afloat. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
  •  - Spain's Treasury and Public Administration Minister Montoro attends a session at the Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Spain's Treasury and Public Administration Minister Montoro attends a session at the Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Posted: 6/13/2012 6:02:23 AM EST
    Spain's Treasury and Public Administration Minister Cristobal Montoro attends a session at the Spanish parliament in Madrid June 13, 2012. Madrid insisted it would stick to its borrowing plans this year after the European Union agreed to the bailout of up to 100 billion euros ($125 billion), which is aimed at rescuing banks battered by a property market collapse and recession rather than helping the Spanish state finance its budget deficit. But yields on Spanish government debt rose as Saturday's deal failed to calm concerns that Madrid may end up locked out of funding markets like the three other euro zone countries already forced into bailouts - Greece, Ireland and Portugal. REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Spain's PM Rajoy listens to a question during a session at the Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Spain's PM Rajoy listens to a question during a session at the Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Posted: 6/13/2012 6:00:32 AM EST
    Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy listens to a question during a session at the Spanish parliament in Madrid June 13, 2012. Madrid insisted it would stick to its borrowing plans this year after the European Union agreed to the bailout of up to 100 billion euros ($125 billion), which is aimed at rescuing banks battered by a property market collapse and recession rather than helping the Spanish state finance its budget deficit. But yields on Spanish government debt rose as Saturday's deal failed to calm concerns that Madrid may end up locked out of funding markets like the three other euro zone countries already forced into bailouts - Greece, Ireland and Portugal. REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS HEADSHOT)
  •  - Spain's Economy Minister Luis de Guindos attends a session at the Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Spain's Economy Minister Luis de Guindos attends a session at the Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Posted: 6/13/2012 5:58:34 AM EST
    Spain's Economy Minister Luis de Guindos attends a session at the Spanish parliament in Madrid June 13, 2012. Madrid insisted it would stick to its borrowing plans this year after the European Union agreed to the bailout of up to 100 billion euros ($125 billion), which is aimed at rescuing banks battered by a property market collapse and recession rather than helping the Spanish state finance its budget deficit. But yields on Spanish government debt rose as Saturday's deal failed to calm concerns that Madrid may end up locked out of funding markets like the three other euro zone countries already forced into bailouts - Greece, Ireland and Portugal. REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - pain's Economy Minister de Guindos leaves after a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    pain's Economy Minister de Guindos leaves after a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Posted: 6/13/2012 5:57:12 AM EST
    Spain's Economy Minister Luis de Guindos leaves after a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid June 13, 2012. Madrid insisted it would stick to its borrowing plans this year after the European Union agreed to the bailout of up to 100 billion euros ($125 billion), which is aimed at rescuing banks battered by a property market collapse and recession rather than helping the Spanish state finance its budget deficit. But yields on Spanish government debt rose as Saturday's deal failed to calm concerns that Madrid may end up locked out of funding markets like the three other euro zone countries already forced into bailouts - Greece, Ireland and Portugal. REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy leaves after a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy leaves after a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Posted: 6/13/2012 5:46:37 AM EST
    Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy leaves after a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid June 13, 2012. Madrid insisted it would stick to its borrowing plans this year after the European Union agreed to the bailout of up to 100 billion euros ($125 billion), which is aimed at rescuing banks battered by a property market collapse and recession rather than helping the Spanish state finance its budget deficit. But yields on Spanish government debt rose as Saturday's deal failed to calm concerns that Madrid may end up locked out of funding markets like the three other euro zone countries already forced into bailouts - Greece, Ireland and Portugal. REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy leaves after a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy leaves after a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Posted: 6/13/2012 5:45:34 AM EST
    Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy (L) leaves after a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid June 13, 2012. Madrid insisted it would stick to its borrowing plans this year after the European Union agreed to the bailout of up to 100 billion euros ($125 billion), which is aimed at rescuing banks battered by a property market collapse and recession rather than helping the Spanish state finance its budget deficit. But yields on Spanish government debt rose as Saturday's deal failed to calm concerns that Madrid may end up locked out of funding markets like the three other euro zone countries already forced into bailouts - Greece, Ireland and Portugal. REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy leaves after a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy leaves after a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Posted: 6/13/2012 5:44:26 AM EST
    Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy leaves after a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid June 13, 2012. Madrid insisted it would stick to its borrowing plans this year after the European Union agreed to the bailout of up to 100 billion euros ($125 billion), which is aimed at rescuing banks battered by a property market collapse and recession rather than helping the Spanish state finance its budget deficit. But yields on Spanish government debt rose as Saturday's deal failed to calm concerns that Madrid may end up locked out of funding markets like the three other euro zone countries already forced into bailouts - Greece, Ireland and Portugal. REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Spain's PM Rajoy, Deputy PM de Santamaria, Justice Minister Ruiz-Gallardon and Treasury and Public Administration Minister Montoro listen to a question by Spanish main opposition Socialist leader

    Spain's PM Rajoy, Deputy PM de Santamaria, Justice Minister Ruiz-Gallardon and Treasury and Public Administration Minister Montoro listen to a question by Spanish main opposition Socialist leader

    Posted: 6/13/2012 5:39:28 AM EST
    Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy (R), Deputy Prime Minister Soraya Saenz de Santamaria (2nd R), Justice Minister Alberto Ruiz-Gallardon (3rd R) and Treasury and Public Administration Minister Cristobal Montoro (L) listen to a question by Spanish main opposition Socialist leader Alfredo Perez Rubalcaba during a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid June 13, 2012. Madrid insisted it would stick to its borrowing plans this year after the European Union agreed to the bailout of up to 100 billion euros ($125 billion), which is aimed at rescuing banks battered by a property market collapse and recession rather than helping the Spanish state finance its budget deficit. But yields on Spanish government debt rose as Saturday's deal failed to calm concerns that Madrid may end up locked out of funding markets like the three other euro zone countries already forced into bailouts - Greece, Ireland and Portugal. REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy receives applause from party members after answering a question during a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy receives applause from party members after answering a question during a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Posted: 6/13/2012 5:34:21 AM EST
    Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy (bottom R) receives applause from party members after answering a question during a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid June 13, 2012. Madrid insisted it would stick to its borrowing plans this year after the European Union agreed to the bailout of up to 100 billion euros ($125 billion), which is aimed at rescuing banks battered by a property market collapse and recession rather than helping the Spanish state finance its budget deficit. But yields on Spanish government debt rose as Saturday's deal failed to calm concerns that Madrid may end up locked out of funding markets like the three other euro zone countries already forced into bailouts - Greece, Ireland and Portugal. REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy answers a question during a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy answers a question during a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Posted: 6/13/2012 5:24:55 AM EST
    Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy answers a question during a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid June 13, 2012. Madrid insisted it would stick to its borrowing plans this year after the European Union agreed to the bailout of up to 100 billion euros ($125 billion), which is aimed at rescuing banks battered by a property market collapse and recession rather than helping the Spanish state finance its budget deficit. But yields on Spanish government debt rose as Saturday's deal failed to calm concerns that Madrid may end up locked out of funding markets like the three other euro zone countries already forced into bailouts - Greece, Ireland and Portugal. REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy answers a question during a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy answers a question during a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Posted: 6/13/2012 5:16:18 AM EST
    Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy (front R) answers a question during a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid June 13, 2012. Madrid insisted it would stick to its borrowing plans this year after the European Union agreed to the bailout of up to 100 billion euros ($125 billion), which is aimed at rescuing banks battered by a property market collapse and recession rather than helping the Spanish state finance its budget deficit. But yields on Spanish government debt rose as Saturday's deal failed to calm concerns that Madrid may end up locked out of funding markets like the three other euro zone countries already forced into bailouts - Greece, Ireland and Portugal. REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy listens to a question during a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy listens to a question during a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid

    Posted: 6/13/2012 5:10:53 AM EST
    Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy listens to a question during a session at Spanish parliament in Madrid June 13, 2012. Madrid insisted it would stick to its borrowing plans this year after the European Union agreed to the bailout of up to 100 billion euros ($125 billion), which is aimed at rescuing banks battered by a property market collapse and recession rather than helping the Spanish state finance its budget deficit. But yields on Spanish government debt rose as Saturday's deal failed to calm concerns that Madrid may end up locked out of funding markets like the three other euro zone countries already forced into bailouts - Greece, Ireland and Portugal. REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)