baby boomers Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In this Dec. 12, 2004 file photo, Tom Moore rides through downtown Fernley, Nev., with his daughters, Bridget and Meara.  In a reversal of fortunes due to the recent recession, r

    FILE - In this Dec. 12, 2004 file photo, Tom Moore rides through downtown Fernley, Nev., with his daughters, Bridget and Meara. In a reversal of fortunes due to the recent recession, r

    Posted: 6/13/2013 12:16:05 AM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 12, 2004 file photo, Tom Moore rides through downtown Fernley, Nev., with his daughters, Bridget and Meara. In a reversal of fortunes due to the recent recession, rural America is now losing population, in towns like Fernley, for the first time, because of waning interest among millions of baby boomers in moving to far-flung locations for retirement and recreation. (AP Photo/Cathleen Allison, File)
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              Nina Musselman sits on her deck in Grants Pass, Ore., on Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. When she first moved to this small town nine years ago, she had no trouble finding a family doctor who wo

    Nina Musselman sits on her deck in Grants Pass, Ore., on Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. When she first moved to this small town nine years ago, she had no trouble finding a family doctor who wo

    Posted: 9/1/2012 3:48:30 PM EST
    Nina Musselman sits on her deck in Grants Pass, Ore., on Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. When she first moved to this small town nine years ago, she had no trouble finding a family doctor who would take Medicare. But when that doctor left town, she had a hard time finding one that would stick. Baby boomers retiring to rural areas are likely to have a hard time finding primary care doctors who take Medicare. Experts say rural areas have a shortage of primary care doctors in general, and diminishing payments from Medicare are making some limit the patients they will take. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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              Nina Musselman sits on her deck in Grants Pass, Ore., on Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. When she first moved to this small town nine years ago, she had no trouble finding a family doctor who wo

    Nina Musselman sits on her deck in Grants Pass, Ore., on Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. When she first moved to this small town nine years ago, she had no trouble finding a family doctor who wo

    Posted: 9/1/2012 3:48:30 PM EST
    Nina Musselman sits on her deck in Grants Pass, Ore., on Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. When she first moved to this small town nine years ago, she had no trouble finding a family doctor who would take Medicare. But when that doctor left town, she had a hard time finding one that would stick. Baby boomers retiring to rural areas are likely to have a hard time finding primary care doctors who take Medicare. Experts say rural areas have a shortage of primary care doctors in general, and diminishing payments from Medicare are making some limit the patients they will take. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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              Nina Musselman sits on her deck in Grants Pass, Ore., on Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. When she first moved to this small town nine years ago, she had no trouble finding a family doctor who wo

    Nina Musselman sits on her deck in Grants Pass, Ore., on Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. When she first moved to this small town nine years ago, she had no trouble finding a family doctor who wo

    Posted: 9/1/2012 3:48:30 PM EST
    Nina Musselman sits on her deck in Grants Pass, Ore., on Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. When she first moved to this small town nine years ago, she had no trouble finding a family doctor who would take Medicare. But when that doctor left town, she had a hard time finding one that would stick. Baby boomers retiring to rural areas are likely to have a hard time finding primary care doctors who take Medicare. Experts say rural areas have a shortage of primary care doctors in general, and diminishing payments from Medicare are making some limit the patients they will take. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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              In this photo taken July 26, 2012, Marge Youngs is shown in her home in Toledo, Ohio. As millions of baby boomers flood Social Security with applications for benefits, the program's $2.

    In this photo taken July 26, 2012, Marge Youngs is shown in her home in Toledo, Ohio. As millions of baby boomers flood Social Security with applications for benefits, the program's $2.

    Posted: 8/12/2012 12:23:21 PM EST
    In this photo taken July 26, 2012, Marge Youngs is shown in her home in Toledo, Ohio. As millions of baby boomers flood Social Security with applications for benefits, the program's $2.7 trillion surplus is starting to look small. For nearly three decades Social Security produced big surpluses, collecting more in taxes from workers than it paid in benefits to retirees. The surpluses also helped mask the size of the budget deficit being generated by the rest of the federal government. Those days are over. Since 2010, Social Security has been paying out more in benefits than it collects in taxes, adding to the urgency for Congress to address the program's long-term finances. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
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              FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2005 file photo, rolls of blank social security checks run through printers and are processed at the U.S. Treasury's Financial Management services facility in Ph

    FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2005 file photo, rolls of blank social security checks run through printers and are processed at the U.S. Treasury's Financial Management services facility in Ph

    Posted: 8/12/2012 12:18:25 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2005 file photo, rolls of blank social security checks run through printers and are processed at the U.S. Treasury's Financial Management services facility in Philadelphia. As millions of baby boomers flood Social Security with applications for benefits, the program's $2.7 trillion surplus is starting to look small. For nearly three decades Social Security produced big surpluses, collecting more in taxes from workers than it paid in benefits to retirees. The surpluses also helped mask the size of the budget deficit being generated by the rest of the federal government. Those days are over. Since 2010, Social Security has been paying out more in benefits than it collects in taxes, adding to the urgency for Congress to address the program's long-term finances. (AP Photo/Bradley C Bower, File)
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              FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, Social Security Administration Commissioner Michael J. Astrue participates in a news conference at the Treasury Department in Washington. As mill

    FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, Social Security Administration Commissioner Michael J. Astrue participates in a news conference at the Treasury Department in Washington. As mill

    Posted: 8/12/2012 12:18:25 PM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, Social Security Administration Commissioner Michael J. Astrue participates in a news conference at the Treasury Department in Washington. As millions of baby boomers flood Social Security with applications for benefits, the program's $2.7 trillion surplus is starting to look small. For nearly three decades Social Security produced big surpluses, collecting more in taxes from workers than it paid in benefits to retirees. The surpluses also helped mask the size of the budget deficit being generated by the rest of the federal government. Those days are over. Since 2010, Social Security has been paying out more in benefits than it collects in taxes, adding to the urgency for Congress to address the program's long-term finances. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
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              ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, AUG. 13 AND THEREAFTER - FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2005 file photo, rolls of blank social security checks run through printers and are processed at the U.S. Treasury's

    ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, AUG. 13 AND THEREAFTER - FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2005 file photo, rolls of blank social security checks run through printers and are processed at the U.S. Treasury's

    Posted: 8/12/2012 12:18:25 PM EST
    ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, AUG. 13 AND THEREAFTER - FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2005 file photo, rolls of blank social security checks run through printers and are processed at the U.S. Treasury's Financial Management services facility in Philadelphia. As millions of baby boomers flood Social Security with applications for benefits, the program's $2.7 trillion surplus is starting to look small. For nearly three decades Social Security produced big surpluses, collecting more in taxes from workers than it paid in benefits to retirees. The surpluses also helped mask the size of the budget deficit being generated by the rest of the federal government. Those days are over. Since 2010, Social Security has been paying out more in benefits than it collects in taxes, adding to the urgency for Congress to address the program's long-term finances. (AP Photo/Bradley C Bower, File)
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              ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, AUG. 13 AND THEREAFTER - FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, Social Security Administration Commissioner Michael J. Astrue participates in a news conference at t

    ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, AUG. 13 AND THEREAFTER - FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, Social Security Administration Commissioner Michael J. Astrue participates in a news conference at t

    Posted: 8/12/2012 12:18:25 PM EST
    ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, AUG. 13 AND THEREAFTER - FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, Social Security Administration Commissioner Michael J. Astrue participates in a news conference at the Treasury Department in Washington. As millions of baby boomers flood Social Security with applications for benefits, the program's $2.7 trillion surplus is starting to look small. For nearly three decades Social Security produced big surpluses, collecting more in taxes from workers than it paid in benefits to retirees. The surpluses also helped mask the size of the budget deficit being generated by the rest of the federal government. Those days are over. Since 2010, Social Security has been paying out more in benefits than it collects in taxes, adding to the urgency for Congress to address the program's long-term finances. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
  •  - Pensioners from a retirement home sunbathe in a park of Badalona

    Pensioners from a retirement home sunbathe in a park of Badalona

    Posted: 5/8/2012 9:14:31 AM EST
    Pensioners from a retirement home sunbathe in a park of Badalona, near Barcelona May 8, 2012. People worldwide are living three years longer than expected on average, pushing up the costs of aging by 50 percent, and governments and pension funds are ill prepared, according to a study released by the International Monetary Fund in April. Already the cost of caring for aging baby boomers is beginning to strain government budgets, particularly in advanced economies where by 2050 the elderly will match the numbers of workers almost one for one. The IMF study shows that the problem is global and that longevity is a bigger risk than thought. REUTERS/Albert Gea (SPAIN - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY BUSINESS)
  •  - Pensioners from a retirement home sunbathe in a park of Badalona

    Pensioners from a retirement home sunbathe in a park of Badalona

    Posted: 5/8/2012 9:13:27 AM EST
    Pensioners from a retirement home sunbathe in a park of Badalona, near Barcelona May 8, 2012. People worldwide are living three years longer than expected on average, pushing up the costs of aging by 50 percent, and governments and pension funds are ill prepared, according to a study released by the International Monetary Fund in April. Already the cost of caring for aging baby boomers is beginning to strain government budgets, particularly in advanced economies where by 2050 the elderly will match the numbers of workers almost one for one. The IMF study shows that the problem is global and that longevity is a bigger risk than thought. REUTERS/Albert Gea (SPAIN - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY BUSINESS)
  •  - Pensioners from a retirement home sunbathe in a park of Badalona

    Pensioners from a retirement home sunbathe in a park of Badalona

    Posted: 5/8/2012 9:12:51 AM EST
    Pensioners from a retirement home sunbathe in a park of Badalona, near Barcelona May 8, 2012. People worldwide are living three years longer than expected on average, pushing up the costs of aging by 50 percent, and governments and pension funds are ill prepared, according to a study released by the International Monetary Fund in April. Already the cost of caring for aging baby boomers is beginning to strain government budgets, particularly in advanced economies where by 2050 the elderly will match the numbers of workers almost one for one. The IMF study shows that the problem is global and that longevity is a bigger risk than thought. REUTERS/Albert Gea (SPAIN - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY BUSINESS)
  •  - Pensioners from a retirement home sunbathe in a park of Badalona

    Pensioners from a retirement home sunbathe in a park of Badalona

    Posted: 5/8/2012 9:10:07 AM EST
    Pensioners from a retirement home sunbathe in a park of Badalona, near Barcelona May 8, 2012. People worldwide are living three years longer than expected on average, pushing up the costs of aging by 50 percent, and governments and pension funds are ill prepared, according to a study released by the International Monetary Fund in April. Already the cost of caring for aging baby boomers is beginning to strain government budgets, particularly in advanced economies where by 2050 the elderly will match the numbers of workers almost one for one. The IMF study shows that the problem is global and that longevity is a bigger risk than thought. REUTERS/Albert Gea (SPAIN - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY BUSINESS)