atomic bombs Photos on Townhall

  •  - 
              FILE - In this Sept. 19, 1950 file photo, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, in passenger seat wearing leather jacket, tours the newly opened Incheon Front in western Korea during the Korean War.

    FILE - In this Sept. 19, 1950 file photo, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, in passenger seat wearing leather jacket, tours the newly opened Incheon Front in western Korea during the Korean War.

    Posted: 3/5/2013 5:53:38 AM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 19, 1950 file photo, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, in passenger seat wearing leather jacket, tours the newly opened Incheon Front in western Korea during the Korean War. The Cold War still rages in North Korea, and enemy No. 1 is the United States, which Pyongyang blames for making necessary its much-condemned drive to build nuclear weapons. MacArthur, the U.N. forces commander during the war, and his successor, Gen. Matthew Ridgway, not shown in this photo, both asked for authority to use atomic bombs against the North. Accompanying him are, Maj. Gen. Edward M. Almond, left, Tenth Corps Commander, and Vice Adm. Arthur D. Struble, Fifth Fleet Commander. (AP Photo/U.S. Army Signal Corps, File)
  •  - A view of a copper processing facility at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    A view of a copper processing facility at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    Posted: 2/19/2013 2:37:52 AM EST
    A view of a copper processing facility at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine 110 km (68 miles) northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south, owned by miner Freeport McMoRan, Lundin Mining and state mining company Gecamines, January 29, 2013. Katanga, a province roughly the size of Spain, was the heart of central Africa's colonial mining industry, its growth fuelled by Belgium's Union Miniere du Haut Katanga, which produced tonne upon tonne of copper and also the uranium for the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945. Decades of corruption and a brutal civil war brought Katanga to its knees. A period of relative stability since the 2003 peace deal and elections that followed - combined with high metal prices - brought private miners, and officials say Congo's copper exports jumped to 600,000 tonnes in 2012, from under 20,000 a decade ago. Picture taken January 29, 2013. REUTERS/Jonny Hogg
  •  - A safety slogan in three languages is seen at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    A safety slogan in three languages is seen at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    Posted: 2/19/2013 2:37:52 AM EST
    A safety slogan in three languages is seen at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine 110 km (68 miles) northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south, owned by miner Freeport McMoRan, Lundin Mining and state mining company Gecamines, January 29, 2013. Katanga, a province roughly the size of Spain, was the heart of central Africa's colonial mining industry, its growth fuelled by Belgium's Union Miniere du Haut Katanga, which produced tonne upon tonne of copper and also the uranium for the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945. Decades of corruption and a brutal civil war brought Katanga to its knees. A period of relative stability since the 2003 peace deal and elections that followed - combined with high metal prices - brought private miners, and officials say Congo's copper exports jumped to 600,000 tonnes in 2012, from under 20,000 a decade ago. Picture taken January 29, 2013. REUTERS/Jonny Hogg
  •  - Children stand on the road outside the village of Tenke, in Congo's copper-producing south

    Children stand on the road outside the village of Tenke, in Congo's copper-producing south

    Posted: 2/19/2013 2:37:52 AM EST
    Children stand on the road outside the village of Tenke, in Congo's copper-producing south, near a smaller hamlet built by the Tenke Fungurume mining operation to rehouse local families displaced by the mine's expansion, January 30, 2013. Katanga, a province roughly the size of Spain, was the heart of central Africa's colonial mining industry, its growth fuelled by Belgium's Union Miniere du Haut Katanga, which produced tonne upon tonne of copper and also the uranium for the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945. Decades of corruption and a brutal civil war brought Katanga to its knees. A period of relative stability since the 2003 peace deal and elections that followed - combined with high metal prices - brought private miners, and officials say Congo's copper exports jumped to 600,000 tonnes in 2012, from under 20,000 a decade ago. Picture taken January 30, 2013. REUTERS/Clara Ferreira-Marques
  •  - Huts and smallholdings are seen from a helicopter in the southern Congolese province of Katanga

    Huts and smallholdings are seen from a helicopter in the southern Congolese province of Katanga

    Posted: 2/19/2013 2:37:52 AM EST
    Huts and smallholdings are seen from a helicopter in the southern Congolese province of Katanga, January 30, 2013. Katanga, a province roughly the size of Spain, was the heart of central Africa's colonial mining industry, its growth fuelled by Belgium's Union Miniere du Haut Katanga, which produced tonne upon tonne of copper and also the uranium for the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945. Decades of corruption and a brutal civil war brought Katanga to its knees. A period of relative stability since the 2003 peace deal and elections that followed - combined with high metal prices - brought private miners, and officials say Congo's copper exports jumped to 600,000 tonnes in 2012, from under 20,000 a decade ago. Picture taken January 30, 2013. REUTERS/Clara Ferreira-Marques
  •  - A train is seen from a helicopter in the southern Congolese province of Katanga

    A train is seen from a helicopter in the southern Congolese province of Katanga

    Posted: 2/19/2013 2:37:52 AM EST
    A train is seen from a helicopter in the southern Congolese province of Katanga, January 29, 2013. Katanga, a province roughly the size of Spain, was the heart of central Africa's colonial mining industry, its growth fuelled by Belgium's Union Miniere du Haut Katanga, which produced tonne upon tonne of copper and also the uranium for the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945. Decades of corruption and a brutal civil war brought Katanga to its knees. A period of relative stability since the 2003 peace deal and elections that followed - combined with high metal prices - brought private miners, and officials say Congo's copper exports jumped to 600,000 tonnes in 2012, from under 20,000 a decade ago. Picture taken January 29, 2013. REUTERS/Jonny Hogg
  •  - A view of the operations room at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    A view of the operations room at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    Posted: 2/19/2013 2:37:52 AM EST
    A view of the operations room at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine 110 km (68 miles) northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south, owned by miner Freeport McMoRan, Lundin Mining and state mining company Gecamines, January 29, 2013. Katanga, a province roughly the size of Spain, was the heart of central Africa's colonial mining industry, its growth fuelled by Belgium's Union Miniere du Haut Katanga, which produced tonne upon tonne of copper and also the uranium for the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945. Decades of corruption and a brutal civil war brought Katanga to its knees. A period of relative stability since the 2003 peace deal and elections that followed - combined with high metal prices - brought private miners, and officials say Congo's copper exports jumped to 600,000 tonnes in 2012, from under 20,000 a decade ago. Picture taken January 29, 2013. REUTERS/Jonny Hogg
  •  - Workers at Tenke Fungurume, a copper mine in the southern Congolese province of Katanga, check bundles of copper cathode sheets ready to be loaded and sent out to buyers

    Workers at Tenke Fungurume, a copper mine in the southern Congolese province of Katanga, check bundles of copper cathode sheets ready to be loaded and sent out to buyers

    Posted: 2/19/2013 1:41:23 AM EST
    Workers at Tenke Fungurume, a copper mine in the southern Congolese province of Katanga, check bundles of copper cathode sheets ready to be loaded and sent out to buyers January 29, 2013. Katanga, a province roughly the size of Spain, was the heart of central Africa's colonial mining industry, its growth fuelled by Belgium's Union Miniere du Haut Katanga, which produced tonne upon tonne of copper and also the uranium for the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945. Decades of corruption and a brutal civil war brought Katanga to its knees. A period of relative stability since the 2003 peace deal and elections that followed - combined with high metal prices - brought private miners, and officials say Congo's copper exports jumped to 600,000 tonnes in 2012, from under 20,000 a decade ago. Picture taken January 29, 2013. REUTERS/Jonny Hogg
  •  - The Boss Mining copper mining operation is seen from a helicopter in the southern Congolese province of Katanga

    The Boss Mining copper mining operation is seen from a helicopter in the southern Congolese province of Katanga

    Posted: 2/19/2013 1:41:23 AM EST
    The Boss Mining copper operation, owned by ENRC, is seen from a helicopter in the southern Congolese province of Katanga, January 29, 2013. Katanga, a province roughly the size of Spain, was the heart of central Africa's colonial mining industry, its growth fuelled by Belgium's Union Miniere du Haut Katanga, which produced tonne upon tonne of copper and also the uranium for the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945. Decades of corruption and a brutal civil war brought Katanga to its knees. A period of relative stability since the 2003 peace deal and elections that followed - combined with high metal prices - brought private miners, and officials say Congo's copper exports jumped to 600,000 tonnes in 2012, from under 20,000 a decade ago. Picture taken January 29, 2013. REUTERS/Jonny Hogg
  •  - Excavators and drillers at work in an open pit at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    Excavators and drillers at work in an open pit at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    Posted: 2/19/2013 1:41:23 AM EST
    Excavators and drillers at work in an open pit at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine 110 km (68 miles) northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south, owned by miner Freeport McMoRan, Lundin Mining and state mining company Gecamines, January 29, 2013. Katanga, a province roughly the size of Spain, was the heart of central Africa's colonial mining industry, its growth fuelled by Belgium's Union Miniere du Haut Katanga, which produced tonne upon tonne of copper and also the uranium for the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945. Decades of corruption and a brutal civil war brought Katanga to its knees. A period of relative stability since the 2003 peace deal and elections that followed - combined with high metal prices - brought private miners, and officials say Congo's copper exports jumped to 600,000 tonnes in 2012, from under 20,000 a decade ago. Picture taken January 29, 2013. REUTERS/Jonny Hogg
  •  - A view of processing facilities at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    A view of processing facilities at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    Posted: 2/19/2013 1:41:23 AM EST
    A view of processing facilities at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine 110 km (68 miles) northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south, owned by miner Freeport McMoRan, Lundin Mining and state mining company Gecamines, January 29, 2013. Katanga, a province roughly the size of Spain, was the heart of central Africa's colonial mining industry, its growth fuelled by Belgium's Union Miniere du Haut Katanga, which produced tonne upon tonne of copper and also the uranium for the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945. Decades of corruption and a brutal civil war brought Katanga to its knees. A period of relative stability since the 2003 peace deal and elections that followed - combined with high metal prices - brought private miners, and officials say Congo's copper exports jumped to 600,000 tonnes in 2012, from under 20,000 a decade ago. Picture taken January 29, 2013. REUTERS/Jonny Hogg
  •  - A view of a copper processing facility at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    A view of a copper processing facility at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    Posted: 2/19/2013 1:41:23 AM EST
    A view of a copper processing facility at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine 110 km (68 miles) northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south, owned by miner Freeport McMoRan, Lundin Mining and state mining company Gecamines, January 29, 2013. Katanga, a province roughly the size of Spain, was the heart of central Africa's colonial mining industry, its growth fuelled by Belgium's Union Miniere du Haut Katanga, which produced tonne upon tonne of copper and also the uranium for the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945. Decades of corruption and a brutal civil war brought Katanga to its knees. A period of relative stability since the 2003 peace deal and elections that followed - combined with high metal prices - brought private miners, and officials say Congo's copper exports jumped to 600,000 tonnes in 2012, from under 20,000 a decade ago. Picture taken January 29, 2013. REUTERS/Jonny Hogg
  •  - Staff work in the operations room at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    Staff work in the operations room at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    Posted: 2/19/2013 1:41:23 AM EST
    Staff work in the operations room at Tenke Fungurume, a copper and cobalt mine 110 km (68 miles) northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south, owned by miner Freeport McMoRan, Lundin Mining and state mining company Gecamines, January 29, 2013. Katanga, a province roughly the size of Spain, was the heart of central Africa's colonial mining industry, its growth fuelled by Belgium's Union Miniere du Haut Katanga, which produced tonne upon tonne of copper and also the uranium for the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945. Decades of corruption and a brutal civil war brought Katanga to its knees. A period of relative stability since the 2003 peace deal and elections that followed - combined with high metal prices - brought private miners, and officials say Congo's copper exports jumped to 600,000 tonnes in 2012, from under 20,000 a decade ago. Picture taken January 29, 2013. REUTERS/Clara Ferreira-Marques
  •  - A worker points to a diagram of the extraction process for cobalt and copper at Tenke Fungurume, a mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    A worker points to a diagram of the extraction process for cobalt and copper at Tenke Fungurume, a mine northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south

    Posted: 2/19/2013 1:41:23 AM EST
    A worker points to a diagram of the extraction process for cobalt and copper at Tenke Fungurume, a mine 110 km (68 miles) northwest of Lubumbashi in Congo's copper-producing south, owned by miner Freeport McMoRan, Lundin Mining and state mining company Gecamines, January 29, 2013. Katanga, a province roughly the size of Spain, was the heart of central Africa's colonial mining industry, its growth fuelled by Belgium's Union Miniere du Haut Katanga, which produced tonne upon tonne of copper and also the uranium for the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945. Decades of corruption and a brutal civil war brought Katanga to its knees. A period of relative stability since the 2003 peace deal and elections that followed - combined with high metal prices - brought private miners, and officials say Congo's copper exports jumped to 600,000 tonnes in 2012, from under 20,000 a decade ago. Picture taken January 29, 2013. REUTERS/Jonny Hogg
  •  - Children are seen with a bicycle on the road outside the village of Tenke, in Congo's copper-producing south

    Children are seen with a bicycle on the road outside the village of Tenke, in Congo's copper-producing south

    Posted: 2/19/2013 1:41:23 AM EST
    Children are seen with a bicycle on the road outside the village of Tenke, in Congo's copper-producing south, near a smaller hamlet built by the Tenke Fungurume mining operation to rehouse local families displaced by the mine's expansion, January 30, 2013. Katanga, a province roughly the size of Spain, was the heart of central Africa's colonial mining industry, its growth fuelled by Belgium's Union Miniere du Haut Katanga, which produced tonne upon tonne of copper and also the uranium for the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945. Decades of corruption and a brutal civil war brought Katanga to its knees. A period of relative stability since the 2003 peace deal and elections that followed - combined with high metal prices - brought private miners, and officials say Congo's copper exports jumped to 600,000 tonnes in 2012, from under 20,000 a decade ago. Picture taken January 30, 2013. REUTERS/Jonny Hogg