Arab Spring Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 1/29/2012 12:05:46 PM EST
    Hamas leader Khaled Mashaal speaks to reporters after meeting King Abdullah II of Jordan, in the presence of the Qatari Crown Prince Tamim bin Hamad al Thany, in Amman, Jordan, Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012. A high-profile visit to Jordan by the leader of Hamas has revived contacts with the Palestinian militant group, but Jordan will not lift a ban on its activities there, a senior Jordanian official said Sunday. Khaled Mashaal's visit was part of Jordan's efforts to engage with previously shunned Islamists, who have been gaining ground across the region in Arab Spring uprisings. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon)
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    Posted: 1/29/2012 12:05:46 PM EST
    Hamas leader Khaled Mashaal, center, speaks to reporters after meeting King Abdullah II of Jordan, in the presence of the Qatari Crown Prince Tamim bin Hamad al Thany, in Amman, Jordan, Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012. A high-profile visit to Jordan by the leader of Hamas has revived contacts with the Palestinian militant group, but Jordan will not lift a ban on its activities there, a senior Jordanian official said Sunday. Khaled Mashaal's visit was part of Jordan's efforts to engage with previously shunned Islamists, who have been gaining ground across the region in Arab Spring uprisings. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon)
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    Posted: 1/29/2012 12:05:45 PM EST
    Hamas leader Khaled Mashaal speaks to reporters after meeting King Abdullah II of Jordan, in the presence of the Qatari Crown Prince Tamim bin Hamad al Thany, in Amman, Jordan, Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012. A high-profile visit to Jordan by the leader of Hamas has revived contacts with the Palestinian militant group, but Jordan will not lift a ban on its activities there, a senior Jordanian official said Sunday. Khaled Mashaal's visit was part of Jordan's efforts to engage with previously shunned Islamists, who have been gaining ground across the region in Arab Spring uprisings. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon)
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    Posted: 1/22/2012 8:00:47 AM EST
    FILE - In this Friday, March 4, 2011 file photo, an Iraqi officer, left, hits and detains a journalist Mohammed al-Rased, center, during a demonstration in Basra, Iraq's second-largest city, 550 kilometers (340 miles) southeast of Baghdad, Iraq. Iraq's Shiite-led government cracked down harshly on dissent during the past year of Arab Spring uprisings, turning the country into a "budding police state" as autocratic regimes crumbled elsewhere in the region, an international rights groups said Sunday. (AP Photo/Nabil al-Jurani, File)
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    Posted: 1/22/2012 8:00:47 AM EST
    FILE - In this Friday, March 4, 2011 photo, Iraqi security forces, right, close a bridge leading to the heavily guarded Green Zone while protesters chant anti-government slogans during a demonstration in Baghdad, Iraq. Iraq's Shiite-led government cracked down harshly on dissent during the past year of Arab Spring uprisings, turning the country into a "budding police state" as autocratic regimes crumbled elsewhere in the region, an international rights groups said Sunday.(AP Photo/Hadi Mizban, File)
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    Posted: 1/22/2012 8:00:47 AM EST
    FILE - In this Friday, Feb. 25, 2011 photo, Iraqi security forces arrest a protestor during a demonstration in Baghdad, Iraq. Iraq's Shiite-led government cracked down harshly on dissent during the past year of Arab Spring uprisings, turning the country into a "budding police state" as autocratic regimes crumbled elsewhere in the region, an international rights groups said Sunday. (AP Photo/Hadi Mizban, File)
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    Posted: 1/22/2012 8:00:47 AM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 25, 2011 file photo, Iraqi riot police officers prevent anti-government protesters from entering the heavily guarded Green Zone during a demonstration in Baghdad, Iraq. Iraq's Shiite-led government cracked down harshly on dissent during the past year of Arab Spring uprisings, turning the country into a "budding police state" as autocratic regimes crumbled elsewhere in the region, an international rights groups said Sunday. (AP Photo/Hadi Mizban, File)
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    Posted: 1/19/2012 8:30:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 29, 2011 photo, Egyptian voters stand on election leaflets before entering a polling station in Cairo, Egypt. The Arab Spring upheaval that shocked entrenched regimes lsat year in the Middle East and North Africa was the biggest challenge to authoritarian governments since the downfall of Soviet Communism, the pro-democracy watchdog group Freedom House said. (AP Photo/Bela Szandelszky)
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    Posted: 1/19/2012 8:30:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 29, 2011 photo, an Egyptian soldier directs women outside a polling station in Cairo, Egypt. The Arab Spring upheaval that shocked entrenched regimes lsat year in the Middle East and North Africa was the biggest challenge to authoritarian governments since the downfall of Soviet Communism, the pro-democracy watchdog group Freedom House said. (AP Photo/Bela Szandelszky)
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    Posted: 1/19/2012 8:30:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 21, 2011 photo, Egyptian Zeinab al-Shogery, 58 shows her identification card while she prepares to vote at a polling center in Giza, Egypt. The Arab Spring upheaval that shocked entrenched regimes lsat year in the Middle East and North Africa was the biggest challenge to authoritarian governments since the downfall of Soviet Communism, the pro-democracy watchdog group Freedom House said. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
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    Posted: 1/19/2012 8:30:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2011 photo, Egyptian women lineup under a map of the Arab world out side a polling center in Giza, Egypt. The Arab Spring upheaval that shocked entrenched regimes lsat year in the Middle East and North Africa was the biggest challenge to authoritarian governments since the downfall of Soviet Communism, the pro-democracy watchdog group Freedom House said. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
  •  - To match Insight ECONOMIES/ARABSPRING

    To match Insight ECONOMIES/ARABSPRING

    Posted: 1/17/2012 1:52:49 AM EST
    Chief Executive of Al-Baraka Banking Group Adnan Yousif stands next to their new logo as he poses for photographers during a ceremony held in the Bahriani capital of Manama June 3, 2009. The chief executive of Bahrain-based Al Baraka Banking Group, an Islamic banking conglomerate with operations across North Africa, says the Arab Spring had only a "marginal" impact on his firm's earnings last year. He detects a new dynamism in many economies in the Arab world, where about 60 percent of the 350 million people are under 25. Picture taken June 3, 2009. To match Insight ECONOMIES/ARABSPRING REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed/Files (BAHRAIN - Tags: BUSINESS)
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    Posted: 1/15/2012 1:00:45 PM EST
    In this photo released by Saudi Press Agency, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao, center, is welcomed by an unidentified Saudi official, left, as Saudi crown prince Nayef bin Abdel-Aziz, right, looks on prior their meeting in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Saturday, Jan. 14, 2012. China's premier visits Saudi Arabia as part of six-day Mideast trip that also takes him to the United Arab Emirates and Qatar. The visit to the region runs from Jan. 14-19. Wen Jiabao is slated to discuss the Arab Spring uprising and talks are likely to also focus on the latest U.S. sanctions on Iran, a major oil exporter to China. (AP Photo/HO) EDITORIAL USE ONLY, NO SALES
  •  - People stand near the fashion dome at shopping center Mall of the Emirates in Dubai

    People stand near the fashion dome at shopping center Mall of the Emirates in Dubai

    Posted: 1/11/2012 3:08:34 PM EST
    People stand near the fashion dome at shopping center Mall of the Emirates in Dubai, January 11, 2012. Economies in the Middle East and North Africa are coping with the aftermath of this year's Arab Spring uprisings and a looming global economic slowdown. Many have boosted fiscal spending to sustain growth and head off popular discontent, but this has put the government finances of some under pressure. REUTERS/Jumana El Heloueh (UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY)
  •  - A woman walks past near the fashion dome at the shopping center Mall of the Emirates in Dubai

    A woman walks past near the fashion dome at the shopping center Mall of the Emirates in Dubai

    Posted: 1/11/2012 3:05:43 PM EST
    A woman walks past near the fashion dome at the shopping center Mall of the Emirates in Dubai, January 11, 2012. Economies in the Middle East and North Africa are coping with the aftermath of this year's Arab Spring uprisings and a looming global economic slowdown. Many have boosted fiscal spending to sustain growth and head off popular discontent, but this has put the government finances of some under pressure. REUTERS/Jumana El Heloueh (UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY)
  •  - People watch a performer at the shopping center Mall of the Emirates in Dubai

    People watch a performer at the shopping center Mall of the Emirates in Dubai

    Posted: 1/11/2012 3:03:43 PM EST
    People watch a performer at the shopping center Mall of the Emirates in Dubai, January 11, 2012. Economies in the Middle East and North Africa are coping with the aftermath of this year's Arab Spring uprisings and a looming global economic slowdown. Many have boosted fiscal spending to sustain growth and head off popular discontent, but this has put the government finances of some under pressure. REUTERS/Jumana El Heloueh (UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY)
  •  - Bottles of nail polish are displayed at a stall in the shopping centre Mall of the Emirates in Dubai

    Bottles of nail polish are displayed at a stall in the shopping centre Mall of the Emirates in Dubai

    Posted: 1/11/2012 3:01:35 PM EST
    Bottles of nail polish are displayed at a stall in the shopping centre Mall of the Emirates in Dubai, January 11, 2012. Economies in the Middle East and North Africa are coping with the aftermath of this year's Arab Spring uprisings and a looming global economic slowdown. Many have boosted fiscal spending to sustain growth and head off popular discontent, but this has put the government finances of some under pressure. REUTERS/Jumana El Heloueh (UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY)
  •  - To match feature ARABS-WOMEN/

    To match feature ARABS-WOMEN/

    Posted: 12/20/2011 8:24:03 AM EST
    A Libyan woman is reflected in a mirror as she looks at headscarves displayed on plastic models at a market stall in central Tripoli in this November 28, 2011 file photo. In post-revolution Libya, Egypt and Tunisia, women are exploring what the Arab Spring means for them. Since long-time leaders were toppled in the three north African states, many -- not least in the West -- fret the power vacuum will leave the door open for Islamist groups to take power and force changes that will damage women's rights. To match feature ARABS-WOMEN/ REUTERS/Mohammed Salem/Files (LIBYA - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS)
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    To match feature ARABS-WOMEN/

    Posted: 12/20/2011 8:21:20 AM EST
    A female opposition supporter takes shelter while providing water during rioting with pro-Mubarak demonstrators near Tahrir Square in Cairo in this February 3, 2011 file photo. In post-revolution Libya, Egypt and Tunisia, women are exploring what the Arab Spring means for them. Since long-time leaders were toppled in the three north African states, many -- not least in the West -- fret the power vacuum will leave the door open for Islamist groups to take power and force changes that will damage women's rights. To match feature ARABS-WOMEN/ REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic/Files (EGYPT - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
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    To match feature ARABS-WOMEN/

    Posted: 12/20/2011 8:19:36 AM EST
    A Libyan woman holding a Kingdom of Libya flag walks past a caricature of Muammar Gaddafi in Benghazi in this June 8, 2011 file photo. In post-revolution Libya, Egypt and Tunisia, women are exploring what the Arab Spring means for them. Since long-time leaders were toppled in the three north African states, many -- not least in the West -- fret the power vacuum will leave the door open for Islamist groups to take power and force changes that will damage women's rights. To match feature ARABS-WOMEN/ REUTERS/Esam Al-Fetori/Files (LIBYA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)