Ames Straw Poll Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 8/13/2011 4:20:47 PM EST
    Republican presidential candidate, Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., arrives at a breakfast before the GOP Ames Straw Poll in Ames, Iowa, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
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    Posted: 8/13/2011 2:50:48 PM EST
    Republican presidential candidate Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., arrives at a breakfast before the GOP Ames Straw Poll in Ames, Iowa, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
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    Posted: 8/13/2011 2:50:48 PM EST
    Republican presidential candidate and former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum and his wife Karen walk behind a bagpiper at the GOP Ames Straw Poll in Ames, Iowa, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011. Thousands of Iowa Republicans mingled with presidential hopefuls on a college campus where they began voting Saturday in the Iowa Straw Poll, the first test to see how the candidates trying to unseat President Barack Obama are faring with the GOP base. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
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    Posted: 8/13/2011 2:50:48 PM EST
    Republican presidential candidate and former Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty and his wife Mary, right, arrive at a breakfast before the GOP Ames Straw Poll in Ames, Iowa, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
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    Posted: 8/13/2011 2:50:48 PM EST
    Republican presidential candidate Rep. Thaddeus McCotter, R-Mich., arrives at a breakfast before the GOP Ames Straw Poll in Ames, Iowa, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
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    Posted: 8/13/2011 2:50:46 PM EST
    Republican presidential candidate and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich arrives at a breakfast before the GOP Ames Straw Poll in Ames, Iowa, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
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    Posted: 8/13/2011 12:10:47 PM EST
    Republican presidential candidate, former Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty, arrives at a breakfast before the GOP Ames Straw Poll in Ames, Iowa, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
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    Posted: 8/13/2011 12:10:47 PM EST
    Republican presidential candidate, Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., center, arrives at a breakfast before the GOP Ames Straw Poll in Ames, Iowa, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
  •  - Walthart feeds his cattle at his farm just down the road from Independence in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa

    Walthart feeds his cattle at his farm just down the road from Independence in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa

    Posted: 7/6/2011 11:36:53 PM EST
    Steve Walthart, 64, feeds his cattle at his farm just down the road from Independence in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa, July 6, 2011. Walthart farms corn, soybeans and hay on 560 acres outside Independence, 460 of which he owns. With farmland prices in Iowa now fetching $8,000 or more an acre, he is sitting on a gold mine if ever he decided to sell out but Walthart dismisses the idea of cashing out and retiring. "Think of it, think of it," he said, "what would I do with the money? There's no better place to have it than where I've got it --in the farmland." He says he expects he will die doing his daily chores. Walthart considers himself a Republican and works as a precinct leader, has attended the Ames straw poll several times and works as a precinct captain during the presidential caucuses every four years.Voters in the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary will be the first to cast ballots in the upcoming U.S. presidential race. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi (UNITED STATES -
  •  - Walthart brings hay to his cows at his farm in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa

    Walthart brings hay to his cows at his farm in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa

    Posted: 7/6/2011 11:35:26 PM EST
    Steve Walthart, 64, brings hay to his cows at his farm just down the road from Independence in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa, July 6, 2011. Walthart farms corn, soybeans and hay on 560 acres outside Independence, 460 of which he owns. With farmland prices in Iowa now fetching $8,000 or more an acre, he is sitting on a gold mine if ever he decided to sell out but Walthart dismisses the idea of cashing out and retiring. "Think of it, think of it," he said, "what would I do with the money? There's no better place to have it than where I've got it --in the farmland." He says he expects he will die doing his daily chores. Walthart considers himself a Republican and works as a precinct leader, has attended the Ames straw poll several times and works as a precinct captain during the presidential caucuses every four years.Voters in the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary will be the first to cast ballots in the upcoming U.S. presidential race. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi (UNITED
  •  - Walthart brings water to his cows at his farm just in the bordering town of Winthrop

    Walthart brings water to his cows at his farm just in the bordering town of Winthrop

    Posted: 7/6/2011 11:32:33 PM EST
    Steve Walthart, 64, brings water to his cows at his farm just down the road from Independence in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa, July 6, 2011. Walthart farms corn, soybeans and hay on 560 acres outside Independence, 460 of which he owns. With farmland prices in Iowa now fetching $8,000 or more an acre, he is sitting on a gold mine if ever he decided to sell out but Walthart dismisses the idea of cashing out and retiring. "Think of it, think of it," he said, "what would I do with the money? There's no better place to have it than where I've got it --in the farmland." He says he expects he will die doing his daily chores. Walthart considers himself a Republican and works as a precinct leader, has attended the Ames straw poll several times and works as a precinct captain during the presidential caucuses every four years.Voters in the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary will be the first to cast ballots in the upcoming U.S. presidential race. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi (UNITED
  •  - A classic car is parked in the driveway at Walthart's home in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa

    A classic car is parked in the driveway at Walthart's home in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa

    Posted: 7/6/2011 11:27:40 PM EST
    A classic car is parked in the driveway at Steve Walthart's home just down the road from Independence in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa, July 6, 2011. Walthart farms corn, soybeans and hay on 560 acres outside Independence, 460 of which he owns. With farmland prices in Iowa now fetching $8,000 or more an acre, he is sitting on a gold mine if ever he decided to sell out but Walthart dismisses the idea of cashing out and retiring. "Think of it, think of it," he said, "what would I do with the money? There's no better place to have it than where I've got it --in the farmland." He says he expects he will die doing his daily chores. Walthart considers himself a Republican and works as a precinct leader, has attended the Ames straw poll several times and works as a precinct captain during the presidential caucuses every four years.Voters in the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary will be the first to cast ballots in the upcoming U.S. presidential race. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi
  •  - Walthart scoops grain to feed his cows at his farm in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa

    Walthart scoops grain to feed his cows at his farm in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa

    Posted: 7/6/2011 11:24:11 PM EST
    Steve Walthart, 64, scoops grain to feed his cows at his farm down the road from Independence in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa, July 6, 2011. Walthart farms corn, soybeans and hay on 560 acres outside Independence, 460 of which he owns. With farmland prices in Iowa now fetching $8,000 or more an acre, he is sitting on a gold mine if ever he decided to sell out although Walthart dismisses the idea of cashing out and retiring. "Think of it, think of it," he said, "what would I do with the money? There's no better place to have it than where I've got it --in the farmland." He says he expects he will die doing his daily chores. Walthart considers himself a Republican and works as a precinct leader, has attended the Ames straw poll several times and works as a precinct captain during the presidential caucuses every four years.Voters in the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary will be the first to cast ballots in the upcoming U.S. Presidential race. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi
  •  - Walthart fills a bottle of formula for a baby calf at his home in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa

    Walthart fills a bottle of formula for a baby calf at his home in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa

    Posted: 7/6/2011 11:21:03 PM EST
    Steve Walthart, 64, fills a bottle of formula for a baby calf at his home just down the road from Independence in the bordering town of Winthrop, Iowa July 6, 2011. Walthart farms corn, soybeans and hay on 560 acres outside Independence, 460 of which he owns. With farmland prices in Iowa now fetching $8,000 or more an acre, he is sitting on a gold mine if ever he decided to sell out although Walthart dismisses the idea of cashing out and retiring. "Think of it, think of it," he said, "what would I do with the money? There's no better place to have it than where I've got it --in the farmland." He says he expects he will die doing his daily chores. Walthart considers himself a Republican and works as a precinct leader, has attended the Ames straw poll several times and works as a precinct captain during the presidential caucuses every four years.Voters in the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary will be the first to cast ballots in the upcoming U.S. Presidential race.