Americans Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In this June 29, 2012, file photo, Pete Michel, crew member for Jimmie Johnson, tries to hold down a tent as a storm blows through prior to the scheduled start of the NASCAR Nati

    FILE - In this June 29, 2012, file photo, Pete Michel, crew member for Jimmie Johnson, tries to hold down a tent as a storm blows through prior to the scheduled start of the NASCAR Nati

    Posted: 6/12/2013 3:11:05 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 29, 2012, file photo, Pete Michel, crew member for Jimmie Johnson, tries to hold down a tent as a storm blows through prior to the scheduled start of the NASCAR Nationwide Series auto race at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky. A gigantic line of powerful thunderstorms with tree-toppling winds is likely to threaten one in five Americans Wednesday is as it rumbles from Iowa to Maryland, meteorologists warn. The massive storms may even spawn an unusual weather event called a derecho, which is a massive storm of strong straight-line winds spanning at least 240 miles.(AP Photo/James Crisp, File)
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              FILE - In this June 30, 2012, file photo, an American Beech tree is down on Capitol Hill grounds in Washington across from the U.S. Supreme Court after a powerful storm swept across the

    FILE - In this June 30, 2012, file photo, an American Beech tree is down on Capitol Hill grounds in Washington across from the U.S. Supreme Court after a powerful storm swept across the

    Posted: 6/12/2013 3:11:05 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 30, 2012, file photo, an American Beech tree is down on Capitol Hill grounds in Washington across from the U.S. Supreme Court after a powerful storm swept across the Washington region. A gigantic line of powerful thunderstorms with tree-toppling winds is likely to threaten one in five Americans Wednesday is as it rumbles from Iowa to Maryland, meteorologists warn. The massive storms may even spawn an unusual weather event called a derecho, which is a massive storm of strong straight-line winds spanning at least 240 miles. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
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              In this Thursday, June 6, 2013, photo, job seekers inquire for positions at the 12th annual Mission career fair in the skid raw area of Los Angeles. More Americans are quitting their jo

    In this Thursday, June 6, 2013, photo, job seekers inquire for positions at the 12th annual Mission career fair in the skid raw area of Los Angeles. More Americans are quitting their jo

    Posted: 6/11/2013 12:23:37 PM EST
    In this Thursday, June 6, 2013, photo, job seekers inquire for positions at the 12th annual Mission career fair in the skid raw area of Los Angeles. More Americans are quitting their jobs, suggesting many are growing more confident in the job market. The Labor Department said Tuesday, June 11, 2013, that the number of people who quit their jobs in April jumped 7.2 percent to 2.25 million. That's just below February's level, which was the highest in 4 ½ years. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
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              FILE - In this Sept. 23, 2010, file photo Army Gen. Keith B. Alexander, then-commander of the U.S. Cyber Command, center right, arrives at a Capitol Hill committee hearing in Washington

    FILE - In this Sept. 23, 2010, file photo Army Gen. Keith B. Alexander, then-commander of the U.S. Cyber Command, center right, arrives at a Capitol Hill committee hearing in Washington

    Posted: 6/9/2013 8:42:01 AM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 23, 2010, file photo Army Gen. Keith B. Alexander, then-commander of the U.S. Cyber Command, center right, arrives at a Capitol Hill committee hearing in Washington to testify about cyberspace operations. Alexander now directs the National Security Agency, whose job it is to use the world’s most cutting edge supercomputers and arguably the largest database storage sites to crunch and sift through terabytes of data, whether it was stolen from a foreign official’s laptop by a CIA officer overseas, or intercepted by a Navy spy plane flying off the Chinese coast, or, as Americans found out this week, secreted from your personal phone records. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
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              This undated photo made available by Google shows backup tapes stored at a data center in Berkeley County, S.C.  It can, at first glance, seem a leap to draw a line between the way Amer

    This undated photo made available by Google shows backup tapes stored at a data center in Berkeley County, S.C. It can, at first glance, seem a leap to draw a line between the way Amer

    Posted: 6/8/2013 11:48:24 AM EST
    This undated photo made available by Google shows backup tapes stored at a data center in Berkeley County, S.C. It can, at first glance, seem a leap to draw a line between the way Americans share their private lives on Facebook or our search habits with Google and concerns about government surveillance. But surrendering privacy, whether to business or government, fundamentally shifts the balance of power from the watched to the watchers, experts say. (AP Photo/Google, Connie Zhou)
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 12:53:57 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 12:53:57 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 12:53:57 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque