American History Photos on Townhall

  •  - Ground breaking ceremony for Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington

    Ground breaking ceremony for Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington

    Posted: 2/22/2012 9:01:04 AM EST
    A couple pass a photo of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King as they arrive for the ground breaking ceremony for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington February 22, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY)
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    Posted: 2/2/2012 4:05:50 PM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 14, 2012, file photo, Maya Angelou speaks after receiving the Literary Arts Award during the BET Honors at the Warner Theatre in Washington. Angelou hopes for a time when Black History Month will no longer be needed to explain the contributions of African-Americans in America. "We want to reach a time when there won?t be Black History Month, when black history will be so integrated into American history that we study it along with every other history," she said in an interview from her home in Winston-Salem, N.C., on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
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    Posted: 2/1/2012 11:00:46 PM EST
    Actor and director Clint Eastwood speaks with reporters during the opening of the Warner Bros. Theater at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012. Eastwood was presented the Smithsonian's James Smithson Bicentennial Medal. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
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    Posted: 2/1/2012 11:00:46 PM EST
    Actor and director Clint Eastwood speaks with reporters during the opening of the Warner Bros. Theater at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
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    Posted: 2/1/2012 11:00:46 PM EST
    Sen. Pat Leahy, D-Vt., left, Barry Meyer, chairman and chief executive officer of Warner Bros., center, and actor Clint Eastwood help cut the ribbon to open the Warner Bros. Theater at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
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    Posted: 2/1/2012 11:00:46 PM EST
    Sen. Pat Leahy, D-Vt, presents actor and director Clint Eastwood the Smithonian's James Smithson Bicentennial Medal during the opening of the Warner Bros. Theater at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
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    Posted: 2/1/2012 11:00:46 PM EST
    Actor and director Clint Eastwood speaks with reporters during the opening of the Warner Bros. Theater at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012. Eastwood was presented the Smithsonian's James Smithson Bicentennial Medal. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
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    Posted: 2/1/2012 11:00:46 PM EST
    Actor and director Clint Eastwood appears at the opening of the Warner Bros. Theater at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012. Eastwood was presented the Smithsonian's James Smithson Bicentennial Medal. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
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    Posted: 2/1/2012 11:00:45 PM EST
    Actor and director Clint Eastwood speaks after being awarded the Smithsonian's James Smithson Bicentennial Medal at the opening of the Warner Bros. Theater at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
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    Posted: 2/1/2012 11:00:45 PM EST
    Actor and director Clint Eastwood, left, and Sen. Pat Leahy, D-Vt., look at the James Smithonson Bicentennial Medal which Leahy presented to Eastwood during the opening of the Warner Bros. Theater at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
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    Posted: 1/25/2012 7:40:48 PM EST
    Shannon Lanier poses at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012, new exhibit: ?Slavery at Jefferson?s Monticello: Paradox of Liberty?. Lanier is a descendant of Thomas Jefferson's slave Sally Hemings. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
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    Posted: 1/25/2012 7:40:47 PM EST
    A nineteenth century bilboes for an adult, typically found on slave ships, is displayed at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History new exhibit: ?Slavery at Jefferson?s Monticello: Paradox of Liberty,? Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012, at the museum in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
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    Posted: 1/25/2012 7:40:47 PM EST
    Shannon Lanier points to the pictures on the cover of the book Jefferson's Children, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012, at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012, at a new exhibit: ?Slavery at Jefferson?s Monticello: Paradox of Liberty?. Lanier is a descendant of Thomas Jefferson's slave Sally Hemings. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
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    Posted: 1/25/2012 7:40:47 PM EST
    Nineteenth century bilboes for a child, front, and an adult, typically found on slave ships, are displayed at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History new exhibit: ?Slavery at Jefferson?s Monticello: Paradox of Liberty,? Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012, at the museum in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
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    Posted: 1/19/2012 3:50:49 PM EST
    This Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012, provided by the Florida Keys News Bureau, shows Paul Jellinek, right, a Henry Flagler re-enactor, as he reacts to remarks by Lamar Louise Curry at her home in Coral Gables, Fla. Curry, now 105 years old and a resident of Coral Gables, was a 5-year-old living in Key West when the railroad arrived. She rode it over the old Seven Mile Bridge a few times with her parents and remembers the porcelain drinking cups and railroad trestle. ?We were told to look out the window. There was nothing but water. I was too young and took it for granted,? said the former American history teacher. (AP Photo/Florida Keys News Bureau, Andy Newman)
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    Posted: 12/19/2011 12:55:46 AM EST
    FILE - This is a Thursday, Dec. 1, 2011 file photo of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange as he talks during a news conference in central London. As the suspected source for the biggest leak of intelligence material in American history faces his first hearing Friday Dec. 15 ,2011, U.S. prosecutors have their eye on another prize: The man who disclosed the documents to the world. When WikiLeaks' spectacular disclosures of U.S. secrets exploded onto the scene last year, much of Washington's anger coalesced around Julian Assange, the silver-haired globe-trotting figure whose outspoken defiance of the Pentagon and the State Department riled politicians on both sides of the aisle. Pfc. Bradley Manning, long under lock and key, hasn't attracted the same level of ire. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File)
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    Posted: 12/16/2011 5:30:47 PM EST
    FILE - This undated file photo obtained by The Associated Press shows Bradley Manning, the U.S. Army private suspected of being the source of some of the unauthorized classified information disclosed on the WikiLeaks website. As the suspected source for the biggest leak of intelligence material in American history faces his first hearing Friday Dec. 15, 2011, U.S. prosecutors have their eye on another prize: The man who disclosed the documents to the world. When WikiLeaks' spectacular disclosures of U.S. secrets exploded onto the scene last year, much of Washington's anger coalesced around Julian Assange, the silver-haired globe-trotting figure whose outspoken defiance of the Pentagon and the State Department riled politicians on both sides of the aisle. Pfc. Manning, long under lock and key, hasn't attracted the same level of ire. (AP Photo, File)
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    Posted: 12/13/2011 9:30:50 PM EST
    Curator Carlene Stephens shows some recordings by Thomas Edison, Alexander Graham Bell and Emile Berliner during a news conference at Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington, Tuesday Dec. 13, 2011. Early sound recordings by telephone inventor Alexander Graham Bell and others that had been packed way at the Smithsonian Institution for more than a century were played publicly for the first time Tuesday using new technology. The recordings revealed a portion of Hamlet's Soliloquy, a trill of the tongue and someone reciting numbers starting with 1-2-3. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
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    Posted: 12/13/2011 9:30:50 PM EST
    A lid to tin box deposited at Smithsonian Institution Oct. 19, 1881 by Volta Associates is displayed during a news conference at Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington, Tuesday Dec. 13, 2011. Early sound recordings by telephone inventor Alexander Graham Bell and others that had been packed way at the Smithsonian Institution for more than a century were played publicly for the first time Tuesday using new technology. The recordings revealed a portion of Hamlet's Soliloquy, a trill of the tongue and someone reciting numbers starting with 1-2-3. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
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    Posted: 12/13/2011 9:30:49 PM EST
    Alexander Graham Bell's Graphaphone 1881 is displayed during a news conference at Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington, Tuesday Dec. 13, 2011. Early sound recordings by telephone inventor Alexander Graham Bell and others that had been packed way at the Smithsonian Institution for more than a century were played publicly for the first time Tuesday using new technology. The recordings revealed a portion of Hamlet's Soliloquy, a trill of the tongue and someone reciting numbers starting with 1-2-3. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)


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