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Ohio, Florida, Colorado Tidbits

wordscanhurt Wrote: Nov 06, 2012 8:23 PM
Iraq war ends with a $4 trillion IOU-Veterans’ health care costs to rise sharply over the next 40 years http://www.marketwatch.com/story/iraq-war-ends-with-a-4-trillion-iou-2011-12-15 The nine-year-old Iraq war came to an official end late 2011, but paying for it will continue for decades until U.S. taxpayers have shelled out an estimated $4 trillion.
wordscanhurt Wrote: Nov 06, 2012 8:23 PM
Over a 50-year period, that comes to $80 billion annually.

Near the start of the war, the U.S. Defense Department estimated the war would cost $50 billion to $80 billion. White House economic adviser Lawrence Lindsey was dismissed in 2002 after suggesting the price of invading and occupying Iraq could reach $200 billion.

“The direct costs for the war were about $800 billion, but the indirect costs, the costs you can’t easily see, that payoff will outlast you and me,” said Lawrence Korb, a senior fellow at American Progress, a Washington, D.C. think tank, and a former assistant secretary of defense under Ronald Reagan.
wordscanhurt Wrote: Nov 06, 2012 8:23 PM
Those costs include interest payments on the billions borrowed to fund the war; the cost of maintaining military bases in Kuwait, Qatar and Bahrain to defend Iraq or reoccupy the country if the Baghdad government unravels; and the expense of using private security contractors to protect U.S. property in the country and to train Iraqi forces.
wordscanhurt Wrote: Nov 06, 2012 8:23 PM
Caring for veterans, more than 2 million of them, could alone reach $1 trillion, according to Paul Rieckhoff, executive director of the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, in Congressional testimony in July.

More than 32,000 soldiers were wounded in Iraq, according to the U.S. Department of Defense. Altogether, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan could cost the U.S. between $4 trillion and $6 trillion. The U.S. has already spent $2 trillion on the wars after including debt interest and the higher cost of veterans’ disabilities.

(1) It's looking like the Ohio polls overstated the state's early vote, which consistently favored Obama in the data.  This could be bad news for Obama:
 

The reported early voting numbers, however, show that virtually every single Ohio poll overestimated the amount of early votes cast. If early voting is calculated at 1,787,346, in order for total voter turnout to rival 2004 numbers, early voting cannot occupy more than 32% of the total votes cast — and even in that scenario, that high of a percentage means that total voter turnout will be lower than it...

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