In response to:

On Bourbon Street you can show everything (but your faith)

Topeka Wrote: Sep 22, 2012 12:09 PM
Don, 1. and your point is? 2. I have endured people spitting on me for their right to object to corporations and prosperity. Nonetheless, we do not have laws against promoting vile and disgusting and evil speech. Nor should we have said laws.
Donjindra Wrote: Sep 23, 2012 4:47 PM
"The law also criminalizes political and social speech."

You're making my point. As I said, this isn't a religion thing.

"Might want to check that chip on your shoulder;) "

You first.
Deeter2 Wrote: Sep 23, 2012 3:42 PM
The law also criminalizes political and social speech. Might want to check that chip on your shoulder;)
Donjindra Wrote: Sep 23, 2012 2:49 AM
"Perhaps we should all read Jonathan Edward's July 8, 1741 sermon, 'Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,'"

I've read it. Edwards doesn't speak to me or for me. But as I recall he did write an interesting report on spiders when he was a minor. He clearly had a good mind which, ultimately, he didn't put to the best use, imo.
Donjindra Wrote: Sep 23, 2012 2:45 AM
"if people are basically good, why do we have laws forcing charity?"

I suppose for the some of the same reasons charity is strongly encouraged in the Bible.
GaltLine Wrote: Sep 22, 2012 10:56 PM
Perhaps we should all read Jonathan Edward's July 8, 1741 sermon, "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God," and then try to be critical of men made in God's image helping to drive the point home to the lost.
Rich D. Wrote: Sep 22, 2012 4:01 PM
That is precisely where the line is drawn - if people are basically good, why do we have laws forcing charity?
Donjindra Wrote: Sep 22, 2012 3:25 PM
"How do you know this is how this man spoke, or how any preacher spoke in that town?"

I don't. I admitted that above. But I know what happens in many cases like this. I know some Christians are quick to cry religious intolerance when that isn't the issue at all.

And yes, people are basically good. If we were not there is no way civilization could survive.

rosalyn3 Wrote: Sep 22, 2012 1:13 PM
How do you know this is how this man spoke, or how any preacher spoke in that town? The offense taken usually is the sting of conscience, if any is left these days. Pointing out that we are all sinners is the offense. There are many many people that believe man is essentially good, when all evidence supports the fact that mans heart is DARK indeed.
Donjindra Wrote: Sep 22, 2012 12:19 PM
My point is, if certain "religious" folks cherish their freedom of religious speech then they should take it more seriously. They can't complain that their religious freedom is being attacked when it's not. It's their rudeness that's being attacked. It's their harassing language that's being attacked. If they simply want to offend then It's hard to defend them on principle. Perhaps if they showed more principled religious motivation they wouldn't be so easily dismissed.

On October 26, 2011, the city of New Orleans criminalized religious expression on Bourbon Street.

Subsequently, in May of this year, a preacher from Vieux Carre Assembly of God Church was told by police that he could not continue discussing religion on Bourbon Street, even though he had been preaching there for the past 30 years every Tuesday and Friday evening.

The new rules were quietly put in place when Mayor Mitch Landrieu approved a ban on loitering or congregating “for the purpose of disseminating any social, political, or religious message between the hours of sunset and sunrise.”...