In response to:

Torturing English To Avoid Saying ‘Saudi’

Texas Girl Wrote: Apr 17, 2013 1:41 PM
In American English, judgement is generally considered a misspelling of judgment for all uses of the word, notwithstanding individual preferences. In British popular usage, judgment was traditionally the preferred form, but judgement has gained ground over the last couple of centuries and is now nearly as common as judgment.

A suspect-who-shall-not-be-named-a-suspect is not now in custody.

The non-suspect is just sitting around a hospital, or some other undisclosed location, under heavy guard, being fully cooperative with law enforcement officials, who paid testament to his cooperation by raiding his apartment and taking away bags of material.

But newspapers with strong ties either to the Least coast or the Left coast want to emphasize to you that there are NO SUSPECTS in “custody.”

Nor is there a connection between the suspect-who-shall-not-be-named-a-suspect and his raided apartment-that-shall-not-be-named-his-apartment. 

There is only a Saudi national with his favored visa status, who...