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Political historian -- why dance around it? Here's the breakdown: The 1957 Civil Rights Act passed the House with a vote of 285 to 126 (Republicans 167-19 for, Democrats 118-107 for) and the Senate 72 to 18 (Republicans 43-0 for, Democrats 29-18 for). Republican president Eisenhower signed it on September 9, 1957. So the opposition overwhelmingly came from Democrats.
The "complexity" argument has it backwards. While a centralized government may theoretically be able to run a small society with a primitive economy, it obviously is unsuitable for a large, complex society because it cannot possibly gather and consider all the information generated and apply it to an impossibly large, interconnected web of shifting individuals and organizations.
You can add the creation of the EPA, OSHA, and affirmative action employment quotas. He also supported a minimum tax on the wealthy and guaranteed income for all Americans. His health care plan (ironically, defeated by the Democrats) was in many ways even more extreme than ObamaCare. Nixon was pro-big government, pro-public spending, and pro-social safety net.
I recommend St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea near Nome, Alaska. It is the 6th largest island in the U.S. -- 1,792 square miles. Sure, there are no trees on the island, but Obama and Michelle will be interested to hear that the local economy consists largely of subsistence hunting for walrus, seals, fish, and bowhead whales -- in fact the city of Savoonga calls itself the "Walrus Capital of the World". It seems perfect.
In response to:

Defining Life

Tacitus X Wrote: Jul 24, 2014 8:53 PM
Annfan - where is your evidence that Jefferson included zygotes in the phrase "human life" in this context?
In response to:

Defining Life

Tacitus X Wrote: Jul 24, 2014 8:48 PM
Wrong, I squarely addressed it. I specified that a capacity for reason is the key. I even identified regular beta brain waves as a marker. I then gave examples of living entities with human DNA that don't possess an independent right to life. You have failed to address these. The fact that an occurrence is unusual doesn't mean it can't disprove a hypothesis -- quite the opposite.
In response to:

Defining Life

Tacitus X Wrote: Jul 24, 2014 8:40 PM
Rich - Where's the falsity? Are you claiming that blood cells and anencephalic infants don't exist?
In response to:

Defining Life

Tacitus X Wrote: Jul 24, 2014 8:37 PM
Anominus - You need to direct your ire to Annfan who said "life is life." Almost all the cells of your body contain DNA but that doesn't give them individual human rights. REASON is the key, not cell chemistry. Phrases like "according to biology," and "that is recognized," are empty argumentative fig-leaves that fail to hide a lack of empirical or logical support for your assertions.
In response to:

Defining Life

Tacitus X Wrote: Jul 24, 2014 10:59 AM
Reed42 -- You need to re-think. In no sense is a zygote "on its own."
In response to:

Defining Life

Tacitus X Wrote: Jul 24, 2014 10:57 AM
Annfan - You're evading the issue of when an entity is "human" in the sense of having indepedent individual rights. Does a blood cell have "basic protection under the law"? After all, it's alive and has human DNA. What about anencephalic infants? Should we keep a headless corpse perpetually alive artificially with a heart-lung machine and intravenous feedings? If not, why not?
In response to:

Defining Life

Tacitus X Wrote: Jul 24, 2014 10:52 AM
annfan -- I believe most people have little trouble distinguishing between innocent human life, the lives of murderers and terrorists, and non-human forms of life. Under your formulation, a mosquito = a human since both are alive. Life doesn't "begin," it continues. A spermatazoa and an ovum are already alive when they join to form a zygote. Someone in a coma already had the right to life and all other human rights. They don't automatically lose all rights due to the coma. The permanently brain-dead (insert your own joke here) no longer have individual rights. Their legal guardians would then have the right to make all determinations, including life or death.
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