In response to:

Republicans Must Show Support for Hispanic Dreams

Stuart95 Wrote: Mar 21, 2013 7:09 PM
loadstar, if we pay $2682 for each immigrant household for a total of $346b, that implies that we have 132m immigrant households. That may be just a little high. This is the problem with the immigration problem. Very few people have enough facts to make an informed decision.
Geronimo1958 Wrote: Mar 23, 2013 11:23 AM
The number is closer to 26.683 a year per family and it is very modest estimate.
Education.
Healthcare.
Social services (Food-stamps and all the rest) and don't tell me they are not getting any. Legally or not they are sucking our welfare system (through the anchor babies for example).
Establishment from both parties doesn't give a damn about illegals. They are not competing with them for jobs and resources - tare all lawyers.
But for the rest of us, we either have to pay for them or compete for jobs or both.
Stuart95 Wrote: Mar 21, 2013 8:17 PM
You may well be correct on all counts; I don't know. I do, however, think it's odd that there are no numbers commonly associated with illegal immigrants except the oft-quoted figure of 12m as their population.

I read the other day that Texas has over 800,000 public-school students who are in some kind of ESL classes. Certainly not all of those are the children of illegal immigrants, but if even half were, the cost would approach $4b annually.
Terribly Frank Wrote: Mar 21, 2013 7:57 PM
Stuart95: (continued)
US Government source. The average cost for K-12 education in the US is $12k/year per child. http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=66 $10,297 (unadjusted) in 2007- 08 (neglects cost of capital outlay and interest payment on debt) $12k with other costs included.
Illegal aliens and their families also overburden the social safety net, adversely affecting our poorest citizens. This is evident in the schools, subsidized housing and medical facilities in states with high illegal alien populations.
How about letting the wages increase to the legal labor rate, so the workers can actually raise a family?
Fix & fully implement E-Verify. Fine and imprison employers who employ illegal aliens.
Terribly Frank Wrote: Mar 21, 2013 7:52 PM
Stuart95: Here are some supported numbers with links. Maybe, you should do a “little” research on the topic. FYI: Of the approximately 11.5 million illegal aliens currently in the USA approximately 1 million are children (plus an additional 4.5 million US born). It is currently estimated that 8 million illegal aliens are currently employed illegally. The Pew Hispanic Center is a good source for information. They are a “Pro-Immigration” group.
Source: http://www.pewhispanic.org/2011/12/01/unauthorized-immigrants-length-of-residency-patterns-of-parenthood/
This would lead to almost 4 million school (K-12) age kids. This is approximately $48B/year for education costs ALONE.

(continued)
loadstar Wrote: Mar 21, 2013 7:50 PM
There are reasons for that, Stuart. The Left and the guvment do not want to admit how much is being spent on services because of ILLEGAL aliens. The miscreant employers DARN sure want us to think that we are deriving benefits from their milking ILLEGALS.

I now teach college economics. My best reckoning is that we have a fairly HUGE shortfall in perceived benefits versus certain costs (birthing and schooling their spawn, "free H/C", lost taxes, lost wages for those displaced, unemployment compensation, penal costs, etc.).

I doubt that you save ANYTHING on the cost of a hotel room, produce, yard care-- that ALL goes to the user employers' pockets.
Rarely does a political party issue a document so scathingly critical of itself and its most recent presidential nominee as the report of the five-member Growth and Opportunity Project of the Republican National Committee.

It refers to Mitt Romney on occasion as "our presidential nominee" and notes disapprovingly of his reference, in the debate about immigration, to "self-deportation."

And while the report states modestly, "We are not a policy committee," it does call for a policy -- "comprehensive immigration reform" -- that many, perhaps most, Republican members of Congress oppose.

I think there's some risk here for the Republican National Committee....