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In response to:

What was D-Day?

YassirSanchez Wrote: May 29, 2014 11:06 AM
I do not agree.
In response to:

What was D-Day?

YassirSanchez Wrote: May 29, 2014 11:05 AM
I met a couple of Pearl Harbor Survivors a couple of years ago while on a Camping Trip with my sons> so glad that they could meet them and hopefully remember the event for the rest of their lives. They truely appreciated our respect and gratitude for their service.
In response to:

What was D-Day?

YassirSanchez Wrote: May 29, 2014 11:04 AM
Tons has always been my considered opinion. In the movie about Vaitzely Zaitsev "Enemy at the Gate" there was a very historically accurate scene where only half the soldiers in a human wave attack were even issued rifles. The unarmed were expected to arm themselves from the rifles dropped by casualties. Soviet technique to eliminate a mine field was to march tightly packed ranks of soldiers through minefields at the point of guns held by the STAVKA until all the mines were "discovered". Funny how no fan of the Left ever mentions this sort of thing when then wax philosophical about how much better the Soviet system was.
In response to:

What was D-Day?

YassirSanchez Wrote: May 29, 2014 11:00 AM
Montgomery did achieve victory in Northern Africa. There is no doubt. The point that is overlooked was the Allied efforts in denying German resupply from Continental Europe. In Europe Montgomery had a much less stellar record of achievment. His conduct of Operation Market Garden would have gotten ANY American Commanding Officer relieved. Just my .02 Eisenhower wanted to fire Montgomery on numerous occasions but was unable to do so because of poltical considerations. Montgomery was a one trick pony, he believed in fighting a war of attrition sacrificing men and material hand over fist while waiting for the Germans to not be able to keep up. Patton was a MUCH more effect tactical general. Montgomery is the most overrated General of WW II this side of Douglas Macarthur.
In response to:

What was D-Day?

YassirSanchez Wrote: May 29, 2014 10:55 AM
Here are a couple of statistics to back up my point. Production of the Panzer 38 & Panzer IV, mainstays of the Wermacht Armored Divisions (rather than the common misconception that the various Tiger Models were the most prevalent) were DOUBLE in 1944 than they were in 1943. Indeed production of almost every Panzer variant doubled every year of the War. Kind of hard to state that the precision bombing campaign was having a negative effect on Panzer production when they were actually doubling production EVERY year of the war.
In response to:

What was D-Day?

YassirSanchez Wrote: May 29, 2014 10:52 AM
I mentioned Allied Air Superiority in my original post. THAT WAS a significant benefit from our bombing campaign. That and the effect the bombing had on distribution and transportation were among the very few benefits from the tens of thousands of allied air crew lost. Was it worth it? Historians are still debating the point. But the original belief of the Bomber Crowd (the Army version of Battleship Admirals) in pre war doctrine that they could wipe out enemy ability to produce the instruments of war was never achieved nor was the goal even close to being accomplished. But hey what the heck do I know? I am just a humble HS Gov / Eco Teacher and I Coach the Offensive Line and Track, That and I am the possesor of around 350 books on the topic of the WW II in general and specifically on the Air War in Europe and the Pacific. My real passion is the Air War in the Pacific.
In response to:

What was D-Day?

YassirSanchez Wrote: May 29, 2014 10:41 AM
I teach HS Government. And I can produce MANY different sources that will unequivocally state that BEFORE the allies actually invaded Germany and STOPPED production the production was the HIGHEST of the entire war. Look up the month that the Nazi's produced the MOST tanks, the MOST planes, bullets, guns, panzerfausts, etc...,... Aerial saturation bombing was EXCELLENT for levelling civilian centers of population. Wiping out factories not so much. The problem the Nazi's had was getting said production to the front along with the gas to fuel it and skilled personnel to operate it.
In response to:

What was D-Day?

YassirSanchez Wrote: May 29, 2014 9:47 AM
Actually Victor one of the biggest myths of WW II was that the Precision Bombing Campaign had a negative effect on German War production. Nothing could be further from the truth. The German war machine never slowed down and even was at its height before the Allies actually invaded Germany. The only thing the bombing campaign accomplished at a horrendous cost was the death through attrition of the Luftwaffe. Now the effect the bombing campaign had on the DISTRIBUTION of war materials was significant. But back to the question at hand. I just asked a roomful of Seniors in my Economics Class who are about to graduate in one week about D-Day and one student knew it had "something to do with WW II". What can I say, I taught them Government and Economics.
~yawn~ Is that the best you got? Really?
Yes he will. He will somehow hear about them (most likely from a student, being a teacher I can promise you that ANY conflict between teachers will cause students to RACE to the participating parties to inform them of what is being said) and will be compelled by curiosity to see what was said. I am betting that he has already read it.
"A university where all the professors who are pro-choice get promoted to full professor and where all the professors who are pro-life remain associates really isn't a university, is it?" Sadly yes it is Mike. Yes it is indeed.
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