In response to:

Rules for Addressing Amnesty

sleepergirl Wrote: Mar 19, 2013 7:49 PM
I agree with all her recommendations above except the elimination of hiring highly skilled H-1B visa workers. At Bell Labs in NJ we hired many foreign workers who had skills not available in the US market relating to science and technology. We paid these workers very well and additionally picked up the costs of immigration attorneys, so it wasn't a cost-savings effort. Now the scarcity of graduate degree holders in STEM subjects is much worse. We actually need to rely on foreign workers to fill this void. Working for STEM graduate degrees has become "too hard" for our typical college student.- I'm not saying all of them because there are still Americans willing to work for these degrees but not as many as American industry needs.
Joseph64 Wrote: Mar 19, 2013 9:32 PM
Watch this and then tell me you still disagree

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fx--jNQYNgA&playnext=1&list=PL126DD55E0E6CD89B&feature=results_main

Corporations are cheating the H1B visa program and bringing in foreign workers when there are plenty of Americans who can do the work.
Republicans are getting a lot of unsolicited advice about how to recover from last year's defeat, and most of it is either ignorant or coming from people who don't have Republican party victories in their game plan. One of the worst of these bits of advice is that Republicans should join a bipartisan push for immigration amnesty.

Amnesty advocates shrink from using the word amnesty and try hard to shroud their message in deceptive words. So let's understand their vocabulary: reform, comprehensive, earned legal status and path to citizenship are all code words for amnesty.

At the recent conservative jamboree called CPAC,...