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In response to:

Disaster Ignorance

sdoonan Wrote: Nov 14, 2012 9:37 AM
--It seems like if the merchant didn't charge more for the bread, but began to split the loaves up and give only portions to everyone, to prevent hoarding and spread a thin resource to as many struggling people as possible, would be a better solution than the merchant just being concerned about his own profit, taking advantage of a situation that is bad for everyone else but--like a windfall--good for him.
In response to:

Disaster Ignorance

sdoonan Wrote: Nov 14, 2012 9:34 AM
I agree, but the merchant who raised the price to double will make out like a bandit, while everyone else is figuring out how to make their lives better. It seems opportunistic, like the merchant is taking advantage of the problems everyone else is facing. The only person who comes out ahead is the merchant.
In response to:

The Conservative Insurgency

sdoonan Wrote: Nov 14, 2012 9:30 AM
I'm beginning to wonder whether there really is a God. I mean, both God and the idea of a soul are just concepts in the human imagination. There's no way to actually perceive them. And people have conceived of all kinds of gods: Allah, the Buddhist idea of God (whatever that actually is), the many gods of the Hindu religion, and on back in history. We now think of the Greek and Roman gods as charming and quaint, but not real like they did, and who's to say that 200 years or more from now, our God, and Allah, and all the other gods we conceive of might not seem just as quaint to whomever is still alive at that time? The whole "God is just a conception in our imagination" thing bothers me. There is no proof, only self-created "evidence."
In response to:

Disaster Ignorance

sdoonan Wrote: Nov 14, 2012 8:39 AM
The author: "That's the unappreciated benefit of freely fluctuating prices. They get people to do voluntarily what's in the social interest -- conserve on goods and services that have become scarce." So-- If the price of a loaf of bread doubles, so I can only afford to buy half a loaf and be hungry most of the day, that's a good thing?
Nate Silver (who has been active for some time, before New York Times asked him to work for them) was extraordinarily correct, as was Drew Linzer of http://votamatic.org/ You might question the New York Times, but the accuracy of Nate Silver's predictive analysis of the last several elections can't be denied. They're "set in stone," so to speak. :-)
In response to:

Dale Carnegie, Where Are You?

sdoonan Wrote: Nov 11, 2012 11:46 AM
The electronic voting machines must be open to public inspection and verification. Who knows what the software inside is actually doing when both the machines and their software are proprietary and closed to examination?
One way is for a number of people to have made a move to another location in the country, but still remain on voter rolls for their previous location. In that case, those people, if they vote at all, will vote at their new location, and not in the old one.
In response to:

SuperPACs and "Wasted Money"

sdoonan Wrote: Nov 09, 2012 4:10 PM
Yes. It needs to be real electioneering, not merely marketing.
In response to:

GOP Folly

sdoonan Wrote: Nov 09, 2012 3:48 PM
That's unfortunately true. Most of the reddest states are also the poorest, with the lowest level of average income.
In response to:

GOP Folly

sdoonan Wrote: Nov 09, 2012 3:47 PM
What about asians, turks, muslims from various countries, other ethnic and religious minorities? I'm sure there are quite a few of them.
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