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In response to:

Thad Cochran's Voting-Rights Victory

scott s. Wrote: Jun 30, 2014 5:50 PM
What law did they violate? MS Code 23-15-575 has already been used in the past and the US 5th circuit ruled that the political PARTY has to take action prior to the primary election before it can even be taken into court. Going through the voter books is a waste of time and effort.
In response to:

WWI and the Second Fall of Man

scott s. Wrote: Jun 28, 2014 10:36 AM
An interesting aside (well for me anyway) was the rise of "communications" at echelons below corps. Wire communication at the strategic level (corps and above) was practiced since the US civil war, but now extended down to the tactical level of battalion. Maintaining wire comms required commanders to locate themselves away from the battle field in largely static positions (difficult to move wires) and also created the need for large staffs to service all the data flow. This change in the conduct of command and control would contribute to the loss of tactical and operational mobility.
In response to:

WWI and the Second Fall of Man

scott s. Wrote: Jun 28, 2014 10:27 AM
I largely disagree,at least as concerns the "western front". If any thing, the Franco-Prussian War and Prussian - Austrian War formed the basis on which von Moltke would build. The resultant Schlieffen Plan as implemented by von Moltke the younger, was strategically valid (and really formed a basis for Germany's operations in France in WWII) but von Moltke underestimated the strategic logistics problems of operations through Belgium. As it was Germany came very close to succeeding before the advance stalled out. What probably was missing was an appreciation of operational art, which would come later as the Soviets developed the concept of "deep battle" that would play out in WWII as "blitzkrieg" before the USSR turned the tables on Germany.
In response to:

WWI and the Second Fall of Man

scott s. Wrote: Jun 28, 2014 10:03 AM
Should have added France/GB v Ottoman, the impacts of which we see playing out today in Syria and Iraq.
In response to:

WWI and the Second Fall of Man

scott s. Wrote: Jun 28, 2014 10:01 AM
I dislike that in the US, "WWI" is mainly viewed from the context of trench warfare after the stalemate in France. I guess that's understandable since that was when we entered the war so that's what we focus on, ignoring Austria- Hungary/Bulgaria v Serbia, Austria-Hungary v Italy, Germany v Russia (see impacts on Ukraine) and Japan v Germany. But really WWI is largely a continuation of the problems arising from the creation of artificial "nation-states" after the Peace of Westphalia and the genius of Napoleon in harnessing the resources of the state to conduct warfare. The resulting problems show why Washington warned about entangling alliances with Euro states. The rise of new nation-states like Prussia, Italy, and Japan would create instabilities and at that time warfare was viewed as an appropriate way of conducting foreign policy (by other means).
In response to:

NPR Shills for Socialism

scott s. Wrote: Jun 28, 2014 9:39 AM
I find a key is the NPR saying they bring "good story-telling". Every one loves a good story or narrative, as you don't have to think, you just go along with the story. Instead of finding and analyzing evidence in an effort to establish facts, you simply supply that which advances the story. Any thing else is cast aside as unimportant. Same thing with Obama's droning on about the "arc of history", or "wrong side of history". This is just another attempt to establish a narrative to be followed without giving any thought.
In response to:

Temptation of Wishful Thinking on Iran

scott s. Wrote: Jun 28, 2014 9:19 AM
How many years has it been since Iran was "a few months" from being able to build a nuclear weapon? Ultimately the ME is a battle for dominance between Saudi Arabia and Iran with a bunch of wild cards in the form of tribal/religious alliances. We could try to play one side off against the other, but that requires a sophistication in US foreign affairs that I haven't seen demonstrated by anyone of any party in the US -- certainly not Clinton nor Kerry. So we end up supporting one side or the other. Nixon and Kissinger were right in that Iran is our natural ally. Carter screwed that up and due to hurt feelings and outside pressure from entities like Likud, we jumped to the Saudis. We have been living with that mistake ever since. Now we see Russia getting allied with Iran. This is a horrible blunder for us.
I think football and baseball have an advantage in that the games are well-suited to TV viewing. By being structured as a set of discrete "plays", with ample time in between, it is possible to analyze each play form every possible aspect. Games with continuous movement are much harder to follow on TV, as the tendency is to follow the ball and it is hard to get an appreciation for what is going on away from the ball. That being said I find just any other continuous movement game more enjoyable -- hockey, lacrosse, even field hockey or team handball.
In response to:

Lies, Damned Lies, and the IRS

scott s. Wrote: Jun 27, 2014 8:22 AM
Yes. It doesn't get rid of the IRS except by name. It assumes the states will voluntarily administer the fair tax. Even if most states agree to this, you still have the problem of state income taxes, and I don't know about your state but my state's Dept of Taxation is no winner. Then you have the problem that the Constitution requires duties excises and imposts to be "uniform" and I'm not sure how you do that with state administration.
This is the key: lack of any realistic strategy. The idea that removing Saddam would somehow result in a democratic country that would serve as a beacon to other ME tribes/populations is just so much neo-con wishful thinking. And the idea that Petraeus and his COIN was some sort of magic solution to the core strategic failure just perpetuates the fiction. The "surge" was all about Sunni tribes' reaction to events, just as they are now key to the ISIS advance now.
In response to:

A Populist Path to Power?

scott s. Wrote: Jun 13, 2014 3:53 PM
So if your theory is correct, there must be a huge number of furious Republicans in the district who are in an uproar over the nomination being "stolen". Can you point to all these disenfranchised Republicans? I live in an open primary state and the first thing the loser always says is that it was the cross-over vote that defeated him.
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