In response to:

How to Run Ahead of the Ticket

RyanM Wrote: Dec 19, 2012 10:06 AM
"In the same way, McCain benefited from tireless support by his Democratic friend Joe Lieberman and a justly-celebrated history as a prisoner of war, allowing him to partially transcend the public’s deep distaste for his party in 2008." This sentence is the stupidest one in this column. Where in the hell does Medved come up with the idea that the warmongering Lieberman was an asset? Medved himself admits that folks were tired of these idiotic wars. Lieberman wasn't even able to increase the Jewish vote for McCain despite campaigning for him. People would be well advise to ignore the advice of people like Medved, Kristol and the rest of the sorry gang of neocons. Listening to them is what got the Republicans in their present day mess.
SMyles Wrote: Dec 19, 2012 3:01 PM
I agree. What gives the liberal movie critic the right to call himself a conservative any way?
RyanM Wrote: Dec 19, 2012 4:20 PM
Probably the same right that WWF tv wrestlers use to call themselves "professional wrestlers". Both are phonies.

Between neocon talk radio hosts like Medved and Prager I have more respect for "professional wrestlers".
RyanM Wrote: Dec 19, 2012 7:28 PM
SMyles,

Your comment about Medved being a film critic gave me an idea. Other than producing violent and vulgar trash Hollywood has remade a number of old movies in recent years, movies that were fine in the original. Anyway, if someone remakes "The Maltese Falcon" I know just the person to play Peter Lorre's "Joe Cairo" character. Use Medved for the role, he's perfect. He comes across as oily and as insincere as Lorre did in the original.

As a sidenote if "1984" is ever remade I think Sean Hannity would be perfect to play the role of "Parsons". Furthermore, Sean wouldn't have to act out the role. All he would have to do is be himself.

A version of this column appeared in THE DAILY BEAST.

If Republicans hope to break their wretched streak of disappointing presidential campaigns – losing the popular vote in five of the last six White House contests – they should learn crucial lessons from the only candidate in that dismal span who proved notably more popular than his party’s national brand: John McCain.

Indignant conservatives may instantly object, citing the conventional wisdom that viewed McCain’s campaign as singularly hapless and inept, and noting the undeniable fact that the Arizona Senator’s opponent, Barack Obama, won a higher percentage of the popular vote...