In response to:

Is this the Answer to the Rising Cost on Employers?

rpexplorer Wrote: Jan 23, 2013 5:24 AM
Doesn't this actually add pressure for replacement of the current tax code with a consumption based model? In this article the emphasis is on manufacturing but in reality, it is the tip of the spear that I think will skewer many different parts of the working model. Personally, I've been looking for a couple of years now on ways of replacing the front desk personnel at the two resorts my company manages and I believe that will be a safe an effective alternative in the next two to three years. My final observation is for Krugman, a prime example of retro thinking.
Chris from Kalifornia Wrote: Jan 23, 2013 8:13 AM
Indeed it does. But with the current politicians in place what we are likely to get is a continuation of the income based tax system we have and a consumption tax, probably a VAT, when what they should do, if they are interested in the welfare of the people like they say they are (they lie) is to replace the income based taxes with an actual retail level sales tax.
Delta Wrote: Jan 23, 2013 12:53 PM
Chris is correct - don't add a tax unless a previous one is deleted
Delta Wrote: Jan 23, 2013 12:54 PM
Chris is correct - don't add a tax unless a previous one is deleted
Delta Wrote: Jan 23, 2013 12:54 PM
Chris is correct - don't add a tax unless a previous one is deleted

The federal Minimum wage in the US is $7.25 per hour. Ten states have higher minimum wages with Rhode Island clocking in 50 cents higher at $7.75.

Costs to the employer are higher of course, even if the employer ducks benefits by using part-time workers.

For starters, employer contributions to Social Security are 6.2% of hourly wages which adds another 45 cents to employer costs. That brings employer costs up to $7.95 per hour minimum, not counting training costs,...