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It is pretty clear that "we the people" did not support the shutdown. Isn't the job of the representative to represent "we the people?" If they so clearly oppose a shutdown, then should their representatives also oppose it? Or do you just want them to do what you support?
Voters also view the shutdown negatively and clearly think it is a serious problem, yet a majority believes their family won’t be significantly affected by it. That’s according to a Fox News national poll conducted after the shutdown began. The new poll, released Thursday, finds that an overwhelming majority thinks the shutdown is a serious problem, including 58 percent who see it as “very” serious. And two-thirds think the government closing is “definitely a bad thing.” That’s more than twice the number who say it “could be a good thing” (67-30 percent).
From September 23 - 29, Quinnipiac University surveyed 1,497 registered voters with a margin of error of +/- 2.5 percentage points. Live interviewers call land lines and cell phones. The Quinnipiac University Poll, directed by Douglas Schwartz, Ph.D., conducts public opinion surveys in Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Iowa, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Virginia and the nation as a public service and for research. American voters oppose 72 - 22 percent Congress shutting down the federal government to block implementation of the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, according to a Quinnipiac University national poll released today. Voters also view the shutdown negatively and clearly think it is a serious problem, yet a majority believes their family won’t be significantly affected by it. That’s according to a Fox News national poll conducted after the shutdown began. The new poll, released Thursday, finds that an overwhelming majority thinks the shutdown is a serious problem, including 58 percent who see it as “very” serious. And two-thirds think the government closing is “definitely a bad thing.” That’s more than twice the number who say it “could be a good thing” (67-30 percent). With the Republican-controlled House of Representatives engaged in a tense, government-shuttering budgetary standoff against a Democratic president and Senate, the Republican Party is now viewed favorably by 28% of Americans, down from 38% in September. This is the lowest favorable rating measured for either party since Gallup began asking this question in 1992. These findings come from a Gallup poll conducted Oct. 3-6 that followed the Oct. 1 partial government shutdown after lawmakers in Washington were unable to pass a spending plan for the federal government. More than six in 10 Americans (62%) now view the GOP unfavorably, a record high. By comparison, nearly half of Americans (49%) view the Democratic Party unfavorably. Roughly one in four Americans see both parties unfavorably.
The budget confrontation that led to a partial government shutdown dealt a major blow to the GOP’s image and has exposed significant divisions between tea party supporters and other Republicans, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll. The survey highlights just how badly the GOP hard-liners and the leaders who went along with them misjudged the public mood. In the aftermath, eight in 10 Americans say they disapprove of the shutdown. Two in three Republicans or independents who lean Republican share a negative view of the impasse. And even a majority of those who support the tea party movement disapprove. http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/poll-major-damage-to-gop-after-shutdown-and-broad-dissatisfaction-with-government/2013/10/21/dae5c062-3a84-11e3-b7ba-503fb5822c3e_story.html
Then the question should be which party is more likely to protect your individual liberty. Personally, I prefer the slower bus approaching the cliff. Maybe you prefer the one going at breakneck speed?
“When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser.” ~ Socrates
"TEAs who refused to support Romney" Don't think he was referring to you since you did support Romney. But there were many purists out there who did refuse to do so and either stayed home or voted for a third party loser instead.
I keep seeing allegations of voted fraud in 2012, yet apart from apocryphal accounts of a precinct here that had more votes than registered voters or a precinct there that had 100% of its votes for Obama, I have not seen any evidence of fraud, and none that would amount to the 5 million vote margin needed to give the election to Romney. If you have that evidence, I would love to see it!
Or, perhaps if all those purists had felt the passion for why the moderate Romney needed to be elected as opposed to the ultra liberal Obama and had voted for Romney rather than sit home or voting for a third party loser instead.
I pity the agents they send there to work the case. I'm sure they will open new cases when their heads arrive in the mail.
Yes, I have (why have to reinvent the wheel), but it seems that many still just do not get it. No, I do not believe Perry should have been indicted, but although I think it was instigated for political reasons, I find it difficult to believe the indictment was solely based on politics. The special prosecutor was appointed by a Republican judge, and is reportedly apolitical. I attribute it more to an overzealous prosecutor.
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