In response to:

The Roberts Opinion: It's Not All Bad

ResistWeMuch Wrote: Jun 28, 2012 6:50 PM
No, it also confirmed that the activity must be economic in nature, which was the holding in Lopez. In 1995, the Court struck down the Gun-Free Zones Act of 1990 and created the Lopez Test. Congress can use the Commerce Clause to regulate economic activity, but the Court held that it could not use it to ban guns in school zones. The Feds had argued that a person with a gun on a school campus could freakout people in the neighbourhood, which could freakout people and disrupt commerce in the larger area, which could freakout people and disrupt commerce in the suburb, which could freakout people and disrupt commerce in the city, which could freakout people and disrupt commerce in that area of the state, which could freakout people and
ResistWeMuch Wrote: Jun 28, 2012 6:51 PM
disrupt commerce in the state, which could freakout people and disrupt commerce in that region of the country, which could freakout people and disrupt commerce in the country, which could freakout people and disrupt commerce in North America, which could freakout people and disrupt commerce in Europe, which could freakout people and disrupt commerce in the villages of Sabang and Merauke in Indonesia.

In other words, the Feds argued that they could, basically, regulate anything because, theoretically, it could freakout people and disrupt commerce. A cow fart in Minnesota could affect Gorebull Warming in the Seychelles; thus, we must regulate bovine flatulence!

The Court said "No."

John Roberts is not a “traitor to his philosophy.” He is not a liberal. He is, above all else, a very strict originalist, and the Chief Justice of a Court that is acutely aware – and wary – of its role in politics. Understand that his opinion, though certainly not ideal for the Right, contains more good news for conservatives in its pages than it does on its face.

So let’s take a look at his surprising opinion – the controlling opinion, as it’s called, which sets precedent and “say[s] what the law is,” as Marshall said so long...