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Be careful what you wish for...
I have to make my regular caution - one borne out by history... Be sure you vote even if you think we're winning and it doesn't matter. For a Republican to win an election, he MUST win by a margin GREATER than the margin of error. That's the only way to counter Democrat fraud and recounts.
In response to:

Is Your Firearms Training Realistic?

RaulYbarra Wrote: Sep 10, 2014 5:30 PM
What do I make of it? I think those little old ladies may have been scared to death, but kept their heads and wits together and were able to do what they needed to do.
In response to:

Questioning the Hairiness of Feminism

RaulYbarra Wrote: Sep 10, 2014 2:35 PM
Frankly, one of the most disgusting aspects of the modern feminist movement is how they seem to insist on defining a woman's worth based on the access to her vagina. That just goes against everything equal rights was supposed to be about.
In response to:

Is Your Firearms Training Realistic?

RaulYbarra Wrote: Sep 10, 2014 2:25 PM
^^^^ THIS!!!
In response to:

Is Your Firearms Training Realistic?

RaulYbarra Wrote: Sep 10, 2014 2:23 PM
Bob, couldn't agree more. In fact we had a saying... "Smith and Wesson beats a side-kick." In no way was I suggesting to just learn karate and forget about a gun. I was actually trying for your same point, but from the other direction. If you're ambushed by some thug 5-10' away, you're going to be in trouble if you're only means of defense is fumbling for that gun in your pant/pack/purse/etc. Even with good placement for carrying, I cringe thinking about trying to draw in an active grappling or hand-hand situation. And I certainly agree with your thought on multiple martial arts - and particularly like how you put handgunnery in that category. Now I've got to go watch Equilibrium again... (sorry, that IS a joke). Truth is, if you're serious about self defense, you should be looking at more than just a gun. My point about "brain" is that whether your defending yourself with gun, knife, fist or whatever it's "Use your head or you're dead," as we were taught. One part of that is in avoidance of violence - something every form of training I know of puts at its core. Two other parts are keeping your wits about you and using your environment to your advantage when conflict cannot be avoided.
First, Panera initiated this, not MDA. That's unique as far as I know. I don't know if it's a matter of their trying to kiss up to a particular demographic or if they are inherently anti-2A. More interesting is that this was released just when Kroger was telling MDA to go away. The timing is perfect for letting MDA allow the Kroger failure to disappear. Too perfect, in my opinion.
The biggest danger of a reciprocity law, though, is that you can bet that one of the clauses will be that you have to get your permit in your home state. Not a good thing for states with oppressive carry laws. The other question raised, is what about states that do not require a permit for concealed carry? I'm not suggesting we should not have reciprocity, but remember there are a few issues to navigate in getting there.
Simply put, MDA is the best friend 2A advocates could have. Are they really going to try can follow this path again? If so, all I can say is two words: Glock Girl!
In response to:

Is Your Firearms Training Realistic?

RaulYbarra Wrote: Sep 09, 2014 11:58 AM
I guess my old training in Kenpo is interfering here. Yes, gunfighting training is a good thing, but the truth is it's really not complete. What happens if the threat is able to put you within *his* critical distance? Why are you just using your environment for defense and not as an offensive tool, as well? Situational awareness is not simply a means of escape or cover, it's also a means of prevention of attack and in the worst case, even a means of attack. The way I was taught was to treat whatever you use as a weapon as an extension of your self. The most important thing, though, is the purpose of realistic training. Yes, part of it is honing reflex and muscle memory, but you get that with drill-work, as well. The most important part of realistic training is mental. That is where you learn to harness your fear and use it, how to think under pressure, how to adapt to the unexpected, how to *do* the unexpected and (at least in martial arts) how to fight while hurt. That's where you learn that your most important self-defense tool isn't a knife, a fist or a gun. It's that wet, wrinkled grey mass between your ears.
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