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WSJ/NBC Poll: Romney: 47, Obama: 47

rauljg69 Wrote: Oct 22, 2012 9:21 AM
Romney largely balanced the budget by cutting state aid to cities and towns, many of which responded by raising property taxes. In his first two years in office, Romney presided over a 15 percent cut in spending on unrestricted aid to cities and towns; he also cut more than 4 percent of funding for local schools.
Agent Crawfish Wrote: Oct 22, 2012 10:17 AM
So ... Romney balanced the budget.
Bill1895 Wrote: Oct 22, 2012 10:06 AM
Blame the idiots who elect local officials who spend wrecklessly.
rauljg69 Wrote: Oct 22, 2012 9:21 AM
Largely as a result, the average local property tax bill jumped more than $700 a year, or about 24 percent, to $3,962 from $3,206. By the end of Romney’s term, the combined state and local tax burden in Massachusetts grew to 10.6 percent of income from 10 percent, according to the Taxpayers Foundation, a Washington think tank.
rauljg69 Wrote: Oct 22, 2012 9:22 AM
During Romney’s four years in office, the state added a net 31,000 jobs, a growth rate of less than 1 percent compared to 5 percent nationally during the same period. State unemployment fell to 4.7 percent from a peak of 6 percent, but remained above the US average, then 4.4 percent.
rauljg69 Wrote: Oct 22, 2012 9:22 AM
During Romney’s four years in office, the state added a net 31,000 jobs, a growth rate of less than 1 percent compared to 5 percent nationally during the same period. State unemployment fell to 4.7 percent from a peak of 6 percent, but remained above the US average, then 4.4 percent. Meanwhile, as the state recovery lagged other parts of the country, a net 233,000 people -- 3.5 percent of the population -- left the state, many seeking jobs elsewhere.

A new national poll released Sunday shows that the race for the White House is all tied up, 47% to 47%.

A late surge in support for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has put him in a dead heat with President Barack Obama with just over two weeks to go before the election, according to a new nationwide Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll released Sunday.

Among likely voters, the candidates are now tied, 47% to 47%, in a race that appears on track to be one of the closest in U.S. history.

Mr. Romney has pulled abreast of the...