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In response to:

Measles, Vaccines and Autism

paranoidmystic Wrote: Feb 10, 2015 7:46 PM
The post so nice, he said it thrice ;)
In response to:

Measles, Vaccines and Autism

paranoidmystic Wrote: Feb 10, 2015 7:45 PM
It will go down as the great shame of our age that we allowed politicians and the media to turn science into a political football. My fellow liberals who reject vaccinations are no better (or worse) than the climate change deniers or any other anti-science position. Science is literally the investigation of the world as it is. We should pay attention to it, even when we don't like what it has to say about the world around us.
In response to:

Measles, Vaccines and Autism

paranoidmystic Wrote: Feb 10, 2015 7:42 PM
James, that is partially true and fully terrifying. First, even after vaccination some small percentage of people remain susceptible. Like 1 - 3%. Small enough to maintain herd immunity, but large enough to notice if they start dying off. Second, all babies are unvaccinated in their first year. I'm not a parent so I don't know the details here, but essentially you are relying on herd immunity for that first year so your baby doesn't contract something horrible. So I think it stands to reason that if a parent does not wish to vaccinate their child, the only people at risk would be a few million adults and all babies.
In response to:

Measles, Vaccines and Autism

paranoidmystic Wrote: Feb 10, 2015 7:38 PM
Carlos, that's true! I live in Los Angeles, and the ones out here that are most strongly anti-vax are that way out of fear of Big Pharma. This is a very liberal kind of fear. So that why I say it's amusing to see so much anti-vax on this board. This is a strange intersection of subconscious fears, where the granola-crunching hippies and the steak-eating tea partiers join hands in anti-science fantasy land.
The political and economic situation of majority Christian nations of the west has been prosperous and secure for several generations. The severe pressures on the muslims of Iraq and Syria are a direct result of the instability caused by the fall of the Ottoman Empire, the callous apportionment of territory to imperial western rule, followed by the harsh military dictatorships which in complicity with the West when empire had become too expensive and burdensome. I do not say there is no God. There's a God for every people and He always seems to command just what the people need in order to survive. Isn't that peculiar?
Chries, if you do indeed believe that modern man is created and not a part of the evolutionary process then you would believe that mankind is the same today as it was 500 years ago. Instead, you TELL yourself you don't believe in evolution. All the while your subconscious assumption is that evolution is real and we are therefore radically different today than we were 500 years ago. This assumption is incorrect, because the evolutionary process does not move at this speed. Dealing with today's radical Islamic threat can only be done by alleviating the political and economic pressures which forced radical Islam to appear in the first place.
In response to:

Measles, Vaccines and Autism

paranoidmystic Wrote: Feb 10, 2015 7:23 PM
I really appreciate reading a pro-science article on this website. It's an about-face from all the anti-science climate change opinions you see here all the time! As my name suggests, I do certainly have a paranoid streak. For years I've read these warnings about vaccines (as well as fluoridation). Fortunately I don't have any children, so I've never had to make up my mind about either side's truth claims. But upon even cursory examination the anti-vax movement has urban myth written all over it. What these tales reveal is our anxiety about the system of for-profit healthcare. We don't trust big companies to care for our bodies, because all they really care about is the bottom line. I find it amusing to see so many conservatives afflicted with this mythology. Subconsciously you have begun to doubt the wisdom of the free market system. ...I'd pay attention if I were you! It's the narratives we tell that betray our inner thoughts and feelings.
In response to:

Measles, Vaccines and Autism

paranoidmystic Wrote: Feb 10, 2015 7:14 PM
Bill, your opinion is precisely why we can't have nice things :( Do you suppose there's a conspiracy afoot regarding the vaccinations? If so, do you imagine a fellow like Thomas Sowell is "on the take"?
The current situation of "radical Islam" is actually a religious reaction to severe political and economic realities. Apply the same pressure to any other world religion and I guarantee the same radicalization would occur. The solution is not about world-view warfare. The solution is a political and economic one.
Prager is completely wrong about religion. In his mind one (or two) religions are correct and all others are wrong. The truth is that religions are a cognitive tool for dealing with reality and reflect the circumstances and culture of their populations. Prager scoffs at the notion that we should consider the morality of the Israelites committing tribal genocide on the Canaanites in 1,000 BC. The reason he scoffs is because he unconsciously recognizes the truth. The truth is that when a population finds a need to commit a morally repugnant act, they turn to their religious tradition to give them the carte blanche. This need usually comes in a moment of desperate poverty and lack of security. It is often preceded by instability in the ruling class and the resulting actions are almost always repudiated by future religious proclamations and reforms. Religion creates the moral cover for committing atrocity, but religion also creates the counter-narrative necessary for avoiding such atrocity in the future. This is the tension of the priest and the prophet and it is present in all major world religions. To claim one religion is good and another bad, that is one is superior to another... This is to misunderstand the actual function of religion and its role in history. To pretend that the actions of 500, 1000, 5000 years ago have no bearing on the present time is to have no perspective whatsoever on the evolutionary process.
For once, I actually agree with Malkin. Who knew this day would come?! It's indefensible for the Times, AP, et al. to not print the offending cartoons in question.
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