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"Executing this play, or something like it, would reverse some of the political pressure dynamics. Obama and the Democrats would have to decide whether they're willing to reject the fix they're vociferously demanding in order to kill popular additional "fixes" to the law. Conservatives could benefit from whatever decision is made. If Obama vetoes the package, Republicans can hammer away at him, credibly casting him as the recalcitrant, uncaring ideologue. At the very least, they'd have a strong, easily-explained counterpunch argument at their disposal that would complicate Democrats' turnkey spin. If Obama begrudgingly signs it (which I suspect is unlikely), the GOP walks away with a string of policy victories that weaken the overall law." You are forgetting one thing: Obama will more than likely go out and make one of his pre-emptive speeches saying that the Republicans need to make this fix RIGHT NOW! without adding any "foolish" conditions on the bill that would cause him to veto the bill. He will want a "clean" bill and will harp on it in order to make the Republicans look bad if they pass a bill with anything other than the subsidy correction.
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