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In response to:

'Breaking Bad': A Christian Parable

Miles33 Wrote: Oct 04, 2013 7:37 PM
That is correct. Walt would have loved to have been a crony capitalist like his old business partners, the Schwarzes. If you don't think the Schwarzes voted for Obama, you don't know how to peg people. Hell, if you don't know that the whole White family probably voted for Obama....
In response to:

'Breaking Bad': A Christian Parable

Miles33 Wrote: Oct 04, 2013 7:04 PM
Hank has a problem with pride, too. He doesn't tell the DEA when he finds out that Walt is a meth cook because he fears he will appear to be a fool and ruin his career, so he only tells one other DEA agent, Gomez, and swears him to secrecy. This is why, when Hank's arrest of Walt turns into a standoff with more than half a dozen gunmen, Hank and Gomez have no backup. Pride goeth before the fall. Walt always had a hole in him. He had not fulfilled his potential and felt angry, entitled. He was a good citizen by default, not because he had a real moral center. When Walt allowed Jane to die, I immediately felt that Walt had crossed a line and become irredeemably evil. Not to like Jane was one thing, but to watch her die, when all Walt had to do was to reach out his hand and save her, was just evil. When I saw “Breaking Bad” creator Vince Gilligan in person a couple of years ago, he spontaneously commented that he thought that when Walt let Jane die he had crossed a line and become irredeemably evil. My favorite scene in the entire series is the one where Walt and his lawyer have been trying to come up with ways to launder Walt’s drug money, and they stumble on an effective strategy, but Walt complains because not only will the police not be able to see Walt laundering the money, but his wife and son will never know that the money came from Walt. “I’m not seeing a problem with that,” says Walt’s lawyer, but Walt’s pride wants recognition from his family for earning them a fortune through drugs. He does not care that this knowledge would be a burden to them, that allowing them ignorance would be a greater gift. Walt is in it for his own pride, and he ultimately ends up hurting his whole family, reducing them to poverty and disgrace. After the final episode aired, Gilligan, again explicit in his recognition that he has been telling a morality tale, remarked on Walt’s final scene where we see him walking through a meth lab that he never worked in but which both he and the faithful viewer recognize as having obviously been built to Walt’s own exacting specifications. Though Walt is in extreme physical pain at this moment, he nevertheless smiles. “He is with his precious,” said Gilligan, referring to the character in the Christian-inspired “Lord of the Rings” who destroys himself to possess a magical ring of power, which he calls his “precious.”
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