In response to:

Gifted Hands

Marion69 Wrote: Mar 19, 2013 8:33 AM
Our entire school system needs to be revamped. I grew up in a rural school, coming form a ranch I had no idea how to interact with other kids and of course no kindergarten. My first grade teacher was Mrs. Updike and I credit her with teaching me to read. 1942 and teaching the basics started me down the road of my life. Skin color was not a problem, but the teacher had to deal with kids who lived in town and went to kindergarten, and rural kids with none. We also had one girl who was from the Japanese relocation camp, she ended up at the top of our class 12 years later. Now kids would not stand a chance under the same circumstances in Dr. Sowell's school nor mine.
AWLways_andForever Wrote: Mar 19, 2013 8:43 AM
And . . . .

Every School Day began with the Lord's Prayer and the Pledge Of Allegiance
Debi34 Wrote: Mar 19, 2013 9:55 AM
My school starts every day with the Pledge. (Can't say a prayer though...). I hear about the inner city schools and I shudder. But, our middle class suburban school is quite good with, for the most part, hard working teachers and hard working kids. The problems lie with the bureaucrats in Sacramento and Washington constantly proclaiming new standards and programs.
Earle8 Wrote: Mar 19, 2013 8:40 AM
"... would not stand a chance ...." please tell me why you feel that way Marion. Is it the quality of the teachers or the lack of direction at home?
Felipe8 Wrote: Mar 19, 2013 8:55 AM
That is a simple question and here is the simple answer. It is both. The majority of teachers are more interested in pay raises and a large per cent of home view the schools as baby sitting places until parents come home.
Felipe8 Wrote: Mar 19, 2013 8:56 AM
That is a simple question and here is the simple answer. It is both. The majority of teachers are more interested in pay raises and a large per cent of home view the schools as baby sitting places until parents come home.
Felipe8 Wrote: Mar 19, 2013 8:56 AM
That is a simple question and here is the simple answer. It is both. The majority of teachers are more interested in pay raises and a large per cent of home view the schools as baby sitting places until parents come home.
Felipe8 Wrote: Mar 19, 2013 8:57 AM
That is a simple question and here is the simple answer. It is both. The majority of teachers are more interested in pay raises and a large per cent of home view the schools as baby sitting places until parents come home.
Felipe8 Wrote: Mar 19, 2013 8:58 AM
That is a simple question and here is the simple answer. It is both. The majority of teachers are more interested in pay raises and a large per cent of home view the schools as baby sitting places until parents come home.
RepubRob2 Wrote: Mar 19, 2013 9:09 AM
You really do like simple answers.
Roy323 Wrote: Mar 19, 2013 4:57 PM
Earle8-I'm not "Marion" but I started to school in 1940 in WV at 6Years Old. One-room-grades 1-4, and a NO BS woman teacher! I had had access - from my Paternal G'Ma to "the Primer and something like "McGuffey's reader" and could stumble thru. Both Parents had 8th Grade credentials Looking back I would equate their 8th Grade certificates to my High School Diploma. Neither of them had much time to 'Help' me with homework nor did I want them to! (Plus I rode the School Bus 42 miles Round-trip every day!) Much of my reading assignments were done during those trips. Wonder I wasn't BLIND by my Military Physical time. eh?
Roy323 Wrote: Mar 19, 2013 5:03 PM
RR-I don't consider Felipe's "answer a "simple one"! There are MANY good teachers all over the School systems. In point of Fact, I see far too few that I would consider truly MOTIVATED. Local Boards are far more concerned with PC, Feel Good, etc than with Education in the long term! Of Course that's a "simple Answer"
Marion69 Wrote: Mar 19, 2013 10:07 PM
I started in 1942, I counted the kids in my class photo and there are 32 of us and we learned! Now a teacher with 20 kids has no chance of teaching the kids anything according to those who want more money and less students.
It is true parents played a huge part in insisting I do my homework.

A remarkable book titled Gifted Hands tells the personal story of Benjamin Carson, a black kid from the Detroit ghetto who went on to become a renowned neurosurgeon.

At one time young Ben Carson had the lowest grades in his middle school class, and was the butt of teasing by his white classmates. Worse yet, he himself believed that he was just not smart enough to do the work.

Fortunately for him, his mother, whose own education went no further than the third grade, insisted that he was smart. She cut off the television set and made him and his brother...