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In response to:

In Defense of a Crony Capitalist

LogicDesigner Wrote: Sep 17, 2014 3:22 PM
The taxpayers won't "pay" for it because the the state of Nevada isn't really giving Tesla money. They are simply giving them a tax holiday for 10 or 20 years. So if Tesla fails, it won't cost Nevada anything. (Unless you want to nitpick and talk about the cost of a few roads they will build to the factory, which is a tiny amount in relation). Also, states do this all the time in order to attract businesses to their state. I'm in Texas and I see commercials all the time for "Start-up NY" where they are advertising that they offer a 10 year tax holiday for new businesses in New York.
In response to:

In Defense of a Crony Capitalist

LogicDesigner Wrote: Sep 17, 2014 3:16 PM
They didn't really give Tesla money. They just gave them a 10 year property and payroll tax holiday and a 20 year sales tax holiday.
In response to:

In Defense of a Crony Capitalist

LogicDesigner Wrote: Sep 17, 2014 12:12 PM
Everything in this article about crony capitalism is BS. Musk did not cash in on favors from campaign donations. He didn't "cozy" up to politicians in order to get some under-handed deal. The way the author tries to paint this story is deceptive. Musk just told the states, "Alright, whoever can give me the longest tax holiday will get my factory. Start your bidding!" This is not crony capitalism. He didn't make friends with these politicians. They fought over who could get the factory for one reason and one reason only. To be able to brag in their next election that they brought jobs to their state. To try to paint this as some under-handed backroom deal is a complete distortion of reality. I think the author has a narrative that he wants to create and he crafted a story that would suit it.
In response to:

What If Chevy Volts Were Mortgages?

LogicDesigner Wrote: Sep 08, 2014 2:46 PM
"LogicDesigner wrote: Once again, John Ransom lies about the Chevy Volt in order to score political points. He mentions a "Chevy Volt starting a garage fire" when in reality, this never happened. Garage fires happen all the time in this country, and there were two instances where a Volt happened to be parked in a garage when a fire started.- Whatever Happened to the Chevy Volt? Dear Comrade L(S)D, That’s why Chevy offered to buy back all the Volts. And recalled them. They always do that when cars don’t start fires in garages." John, you really need to realize that lying about things that can be so easily checked in the internet age is not going to get you very far. The buyback (and recall) was not offered as a result of garage fires, but as a result of the two crash test fires that occurred over a week after the Volts were crashed. (If it takes you a week to get out of your car after an accident, you have bigger problems to worry about.) Those two fires are the *only* times a Volt has caused a fire. As I said before (and as you cut out when you quoted my comment), the local fire marshals in both of the garage fires concluded that the fires did not originate with the Volts. Only bloggers like yourself are still confused about this point. PS: A grand total of 24 people took part in the buyback program. The Volt has the highest customer satisfaction rating of any car that GM has *ever* made.
In response to:

What If Chevy Volts Were Mortgages?

LogicDesigner Wrote: Sep 08, 2014 2:30 PM
"LogicDesigner wrote: Those $80,000 figures have long since been debunked, mdibrezzo. You will only see them continue to be used by bloggers like John Ransom who are intent on deceiving their readers. Don't be a victim of Ransom's deception by continuing to use that $80,000 figure. - Whatever Happened to the Chevy Volt? Dear Comrade L(S)D, Actually no one knows what the realized loss on the Chevy Volt will be because Government Motors won’t tell us. It’s probably higher than $80,000 per car. Here’s why: The company spent the $80,000 per car in capital costs with intention of selling 60,000 Volts every year. It took them six years to sell about 65,000 them in total. Yet still they have invested more capital in the Volt. But this year they have finally conceded that the Volt won’t be a mass-market success." Once again John, you got the numbers all wrong. I'll explain it again, but this time check around the office at Townhall and see if there is a finance editor around somewhere to help walk you through it. "The statement that GM 'loses' over $40K per Volt is preposterous. What the 'analyst' in whom poor Ben Klayman placed his faith has done is to divide the total development cost and plant investment by the number of Volts produced thus far. That’s like saying that a real estate company that puts up a $10 million building and has rental income of one million the first year is 'losing' 9 million dollars, or several hundred thousand per renter." http://www.forbes.com/sites/boblutz/2012/09/10/the-real-story-on-gms-volt-costs/ Put in another way, once the first Volt rolled off the assembly line, you could have crafted a headline, using the typical John Ransom deceptive math, entitled "GM loses one billion dollars per Volt!" Then after the second Volt rolled off the assembly line it would have been, "Well actually, GM loses half a billion dollars per Volt!" The guy who came up with the deceptive $80,000 number simply waited until ten thousand or so rolled off the assembly line. You see, if he (or you) had said "a billion dollars!" everyone would have laughed you off. But with a more-believable $80,000 figure, enough people wouldn't check the math for the story to take off. With every car that has rolled off the assembly line in the years since, that deceptive $80,000 figure has shrunk. So no, it is definitely not "probably higher than $80,000 per car." However, to this day people like you, John Ransom, use it to mislead people.
Those $80,000 figures have long since been debunked, mdibrezzo. You will only see them continue to be used by bloggers like John Ransom who are intent on deceiving their readers. Here is a quote from a Forbes article that explains why those numbers are pure deception: "The statement that GM “loses” over $40K per Volt is preposterous. What the “analyst” in whom poor Ben Klayman placed his faith has done is to divide the total development cost and plant investment by the number of Volts produced thus far. That’s like saying that a real estate company that puts up a $10 million building and has rental income of one million the first year is “losing” 9 million dollars, or several hundred thousand per renter." http://www.forbes.com/sites/boblutz/2012/09/10/the-real-story-on-gms-volt-costs/ Don't be a victim of Ransom's deception by continuing to use that $80,000 figure.
Do you remember when North Korea was going full bore into its nuclear weapons program and we did nothing about it? Do you remember when we had scant evidence of WMDs in Iraq and went in anyway? What was the difference between N. Korea and Iraq? If your answer is something other than "oil" then I have a bridge I would like to sell you. I remember when gas was one-fourth the price that it is today... not long after we fought the Gulf War in Kuwait. Unfortunately the second Iraq war was such a bungled mess that it destabilized the region. Now that, combined with the rising middle class in China and the diminishing of easily recoverable oil, has seen the price of oil rise. I don't like lining the pockets of some sheik, mullah, or Russian oligarch whenever I fill up my tank. Cars like the Volt, however, are powered by homegrown electricity, which can't be held hostage by OPEC or have its price driven through the roof by a global crisis. Be patriotic. Stop terrorism. Buy a Volt.
Sorry, but I think the tax rebates are tiny compared to the trillion dollars and thousands of lives we spent in Iraq. Spending such a small amount on something that might help prevent a repeat of that is well worth it.
You don't seem to understand the definition of oxymoron, but don't worry, I understand the insult you were trying to make. It's jihad juice, not because they discovered it, but because countries like Iran and Qatar make zillions off selling oil while at the same time funding jihadi groups. Oil is a global market, so every time we use it we are contributing to global demand which sets the global price that countries like these profit from.
The same people who paid a trillion dollars to fight the war in Iraq. If these rebates take our country a small step closer to not having to fight the next Kuwait, Iraq, or Iran war, then they are well worth it. The most patriotic thing we can do is stop driving our cars on jihad juice.
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