In response to:

Arizona Can't Do It; Washington Won't

loadstar Wrote: Jun 26, 2012 1:26 PM
http://www.cis.org/ImmigrantCrime Immigration and Crime: Assessing a Conflicted Issue This study examines academic and government research on the question of immigrant crime. New government data indicate that immigrants have high rates of criminality, while older academic research found low rates. The overall picture of immigrants and crime remains confused due to a lack of good data and contrary information. However, the newer government data indicate that there are legitimate public safety reasons for local law enforcement to work with federal immigration authorities.
Hunrodr Wrote: Jun 26, 2012 2:05 PM
it's not confusing for those of us who have had to live with these illegal immigrants. they pack 8-15 people into 2 bedroom apartments....they clean just enuff to live but not enuff to keep the bugs down... they drink like alcoholics and acost women and act rudely in front of children. A good friend of mine who immagrated here from South America explained that that was the difference between illegals and hispanics....hispanics care, they take the time to do it right....they care about family values....they don't make a wage w/o paying income taxes and send most of their money back across the border. Call me any name you wish...i lived with these people and fixed the apartments they lived in....over and over again.
loadstar Wrote: Jun 26, 2012 1:26 PM
The newer information available as a result of better screening of the incarcerated population suggests that, in many parts of the country, immigrants are responsible for a significant share of crime. This indicates that there are legitimate public safety reasons for local law enforcement agencies to determine the immigration status of offenders and to work with federal immigration authorities.
President Barack Obama hailed the Supreme Court's 5-3 decision Monday that struck down most of Arizona's 2010 immigration law. In a statement released by the White House, however, the president said that he remains "concerned about the practical impact of the remaining provision of the Arizona law that requires local law enforcement officials to check the immigration status of anyone they even suspect to be here illegally."

All eight voting members of the Supreme Court upheld this provision, which requires that Arizona cops try to determine the immigration status of individuals who have been stopped for reasons not involving immigration.

Even though federal...