In response to:

Beyond the Supreme Court: A Guide to Settling Gay Marriage

Larry1764 Wrote: Dec 15, 2012 8:39 AM
David, Christian love can give respect, help, friendship, etc. without approving of a lifestyle which the Christian sees as unnatural. (No one, Christian or otherwise, can do it perfectly and I would hope that any continuing friendship with a gay person would grow less-imperfect). Withholding approval of a lifestyle, however, is not the same as denying a person of anything legitimate. A parent often withholds what a child wants but the parent is responsible for deciding what is correct to give a child. The child often interprets this as a lack of love when in fact it can be an expression of love. I would hope that as I learn better how to relate in love to a gay person, the gay person would also learn to understand my own unwillingness
Cambermeister Wrote: Dec 15, 2012 2:28 PM
"Both Tinsldr2 and I have gay sons. They are fine, upstanding young men because we love them unconditionally and have not asked them to be something they are not"

Explains alot.
David3036 Wrote: Dec 15, 2012 2:02 PM
You still think that's "love"? You're hopeless.

Look at the number of gay teenagers who have committed suicide because they were loved to death by parents who think the way you do. If you insist that asking someone to change what he KNOWS he cannot change is love, then you must bear some responsibility for those deaths.

Both Tinsldr2 and I have gay sons. They are fine, upstanding young men because we love them unconditionally and have not asked them to be something they are not.
Larry1764 Wrote: Dec 15, 2012 8:41 AM
to approve of what I cannot see as legitimate. Mutual respect would be the beginning of a meaningful friendship. The country's changing laws and "social acceptance" standards, all may be considerably in favor of gay couples, but a Christian would still have to maintain his beliefs. I only suggest that it can be done with a truly Christian attitude.

As the U.S. Supreme Court prepares to tackle two gay marriage issues, those of us looking for some sweeping overall conclusions on the issue should temper our expectations.

The cases to be examined by the high court involve some specifics-- the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act, and the range of benefits the federal government should grant in states choosing to recognize gay unions.

Both will necessarily involve some examination of what role the federal government should play in matters of gay marriage, but neither is likely to settle the biggest questions:

What is the proper...