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In response to:

Is the Criminal Justice System Racist?

Kenneth L. Wrote: Aug 18, 2014 10:33 AM
Use of disparate impact is an evil because, even if causation explains a correlation, in whole or in part, it doesn't suggest an action or solution. Saying that there are too many blacks in jail is to say nothing. It's like saying the corn isn't high enough on July 19th. Why are the young black males in jail? Why isn't the corn higher? Is there anything that could be done to remedy the aspects of the situation that need to be changed? Does the observed statistic suggest that fewer young male blacks should be in jail, or that more of them should be in jail in order to make a long-term change for the better in the communities they prey upon? Obviously I'm being provocative. But the point is (and I believe this is one of the perhaps too-subtle Goodman's points) that a statistic alone suggests nothing.
"...Blacks Live in a Different America." Steve, this makes me want to cry. You pretend to be libertarian, but you spout meaningless nonsense that excites feelings of deprivation and resentment. What do you suggest we do to remedy this situation? Maybe knock out a few Asian kids at random to take them down a peg? We all live in the same America, Steve. I hate to give you the bad news. Sometimes it rains here and sometimes the sun shines. Those who refuse to make the best of their circumstances will lose, like it or not. Your bleating today amounts to profiteering, writing the most transparent pandering to the most helpless among us in this one America.
"How fair is it to blame children raised in poor, lawless communities for turning out badly as adults? How would your kids do if they had been raised in those circumstances?" Steve, it's not fair at all. But this is the worst kind of non sequitur, red herring, irrelevant statement we ever see from the most craven political opportunists. It breaks my heart to see people like du2 on here parroting the mush they are fed by pseudo-intellectuals like you. How fair is it to avoid hiring columnists who can't write? How fair is it to use disparate impact to discriminate against whites in hiring into public employment or acceptance into good colleges. What does "fair" have to do with anything? Is it fair that it rained on some parades on July 4? What you need to do, Steve, is to imagine what public policies would actually help us pull our poor citizens out of the traps in poverty that have been carefully cultivated by government for nearly half a century. Sorry if I sound a little cranky. But you know it's been more than a short while that we've been listening to the tragically wrong-headed things you have written today. When will you realize that they are not helpful?
In response to:

Let Congress Vote on Iraq War III

Kenneth L. Wrote: Aug 15, 2014 2:08 PM
Buchanan takes us around Robin Hood's barn reasoning his way to a conclusion. But his headline is right on the money. Our cowardly Congress can't be trusted to stand in when the going gets tough. Beginning with Viet Nam, they have humiliated us Americans time after time. In Iraq, after voting to authorize the use of force they politicized the funding of proper armor for personnel vehicles. Unconscionable. Congress needs to step up and assert its sole authority to declare war. I don't imagine them doing so because there isn't a grownup left in our government, but that doesn't make Buchanan wrong.
In response to:

Is ISIS 'An Existential Threat'?

Kenneth L. Wrote: Aug 12, 2014 10:27 PM
The last time we ever successfully got somebody to back down was when Kennedy told Kruschev to take the missiles out of Cuba. Was that "...rushing into more wars"? No. It wasn't necessary for us to fire a shot in anger because we hadn't yet left Viet Nam, after nearly winning that "war," with our tail between our legs.
In response to:

Saving the Planet, One Denier at a Time

Kenneth L. Wrote: Aug 12, 2014 10:14 PM
I miss the debate. Where is Michael Hillinger? Does the absence of a contrary view mean that reality is beginning to become obvious to even the most convinced, recently indoctrinated college graduates?
In response to:

Attacking Achievement

Kenneth L. Wrote: Aug 12, 2014 10:11 PM
traitorbill Wrote: "Happens often with college affirmative action. Black kids who could thrive at a regular college drop out of elite colleges all of the time. They're the unrecognized victims of affirmative action." bill, you are exactly right. This is one of the typical unintended consequences of government policies that are never acknowledged. It's like the marriage penalty in our tax code, and the punishment of work in our "entitlement" programs. Almost 50 years of the war on poverty and the rate of poverty is the same. But can you get anybody to take a rational look at the programs and suggest obvious reforms? No.
In response to:

Is ISIS 'An Existential Threat'?

Kenneth L. Wrote: Aug 12, 2014 10:00 PM
Anonymous908, I don't disagree with you in principle. But you have to consider history as a continuum, not as a snapshot. You're falling into the trap Buchanan is in. If we had followed Reagan's policy of deterrence we would not now be facing the decision you describe as "...rush[ing] into more wars." If Assad had believed we would enforce a red line there would have been no need to do so. But our waffling almost continuously since WWII, except for the brief, realistic policies of Reagan, has led us to become the toothless wonder that Obama has aspired for us to be since the first days of his presidency, and the apology tour. There will be a cost. Whether we pay it or the world pays it remains to be seen, but I'm afraid the future is likely to be one of increasing chaos and violence in the absence of U.S. strength. We've squandered our credibility.
In response to:

Is ISIS 'An Existential Threat'?

Kenneth L. Wrote: Aug 12, 2014 3:26 PM
Okay, Pat, I'll bite. Is ISIS an "existential threat" to the U.S.? The answer to this trivial question and the dichotomy and political nonsense you offer in your article is "no." So what? Beginning with our ignominious, humiliating exit from Viet Nam, followed by our almost immediate failure to keep our promises, our violation of the Paris accord, and our cowardly hand-wringing while millions were exterminated in the killing fields of Cambodia and Laos, we have become a non-entity on the world stage. The final nail in the coffin of our peace-keeping role, our moral example, was the "red line" in Syria. If anybody takes us seriously again it is likely to be a long time from now. So good for you and your pals Nixon, et al. The problem with your thinking is that you offer a superficial dichotomy of pre-emptive "war" or non-involvement. And you offer your argument of even that silly choice over the short term. The greatest strategic thinkers on the world stage in our lifetime were not Richard Nixon or, certainly, Barack Obama. They were Reagan and Thatcher, who understood "peace through strength." I give you a D minus.
Interesting discussion. Ms. Parker, I think your thesis is brilliant, and I hope you are right. I am getting dizzy trying to follow the reasoning of Dr. X and eric (why not?). They express their own opinion, assure us that it is simply opinion and that there is no need to provide any evidence, then they cite it as the reason that Parker is wrong, insisting all the while that they are not using a straw man argument. My head hurts!
The pendulum swings both ways, and although I'd prefer to see some movement to the right I will object to activism by any agency of government as improper. The principle is important. Without the power being retained by the people's representatives we will be unable to preserve order. Once activism becomes commonplace the only solution will be to take up arms. We'll be dealing with tyranny, chaos or both.
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