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In response to:

The Rudeness of Registries

jwilliams Wrote: Jun 23, 2014 7:23 PM
"Thank you notes don't cost much money, for example, but I can't remember the last time I got one from a newlywed." That is a sad sign. No excuse for that.
In response to:

The Rudeness of Registries

jwilliams Wrote: Jun 23, 2014 5:25 PM
"At our wedding nearly 30 years ago" And you don't think the economy has changed just an eensy, weensy bit since then? You're right, these folks aren't ten years old anymore. Nowadays they're trying to pay a mortgage, massive amounts of student debt, and oh yeah, trying to navigate the modern wedding-industrial complex, which is going to be very expensive even if they try to keep it modest, especially if they value the presence of their friends and family as much as you do and don't start cutting the guest list.
In response to:

The Rudeness of Registries

jwilliams Wrote: Jun 23, 2014 2:39 PM
"And amazingly enough, someone bought the stools for them. I did what I always do -- I made them a quilted wallhanging to display in their house. Well, I've never seen it displayed, so I know how much they value my time and creativity." Not to impugn your quilting ability, but I think this is an example of why registries came about. If they didn't indicate they wanted a quilted wall-hanging, or give any input as to what kind of wall-hanging might go with their tastes and existing decorations if they did want one, then you were rolling the dice when you went to all that time and effort. And that's fine! People are still free to roll the dice on a gift that may or may not be a hit, but most people would rather just go with the sure bet.
In response to:

The Rudeness of Registries

jwilliams Wrote: Jun 23, 2014 2:29 PM
I don't see the big deal. Yeah, I can see why GREEDILY using a registry would be bad, but why throw out the whole system because some people abuse it? Dangerous logic there. Registries are a good way to not get three separate blenders or a mess of pots and pans you'll never use. You can still by something that ISN'T on the registry, but the registry is a good way for guests to keep track of the usual wedding gift items and avoid giving the couple something they're already getting. And you can call it tacky if you like, but there's nothing I like more when giving someone a gift than knowing that they'll like it and will use it.
Greek Orthodox Christian.
I think the school district is interpreting the current legal atmosphere too rigidly. The chances of them losing a court case here would be astronomically low if they let the kid say his prayer, but then it didn't help his case much that each new draft of his speech was more antagonistic to the school. So, do I think the school did the right thing here? No. Do I think their actions indicate we live in a culture that is highly sensitive to religious matters? Yes. Do I think this is an indication of a massive conspiracy to snuff out Christianity in America? Of course not.
Darby - public high schools are run by the local and state government. That's what makes them public. How many pagan holidays does the federal government recognize with as national holiday? How many presidents of any other religion have we had? How many members of Congress of any other religion do we have? How many deities of other religions does the pledge of allegiance or our currency mention? How frequently does the most popular news network in the country (by a wide margin) discuss Christianity compared to any other religion? If you go looking for a reason to feel like a victim, you'll find one - liberals always do.
Well, I guess you didn't see it last time, so I'll just paste it again: A government function opening with a basic Christian prayer would not have endangered that in an age where damn near everybody in America was some kind of Christian. A government function including a Christian prayer nowadays DOES endanger that, and don't try the straw man about how it might "offend" someone - this is about the government taking a side in an area where the founders wanted it to stay neutral. And I'll say this again, too: it is in terrible taste to act as though Christianity is suppressed in America today. Go to Somalia - they'll show you what suppression looks like. No religion in America is given more deference than Christianity - to anybody but a right-wing Christian looking for a reason to feel like a martyr, America is bursting with Christianity.
Nijer: give one example where a student was ALLOWED to thank Visnu or Allah. I'll make you a deal: for every example you provide, I'll find 10 examples of students being allowed to thank God or Jesus.
Darby: the 14th amendment, in practice, extends the Bill of Rights to state and local bodies.
"Many church services were held in govt buildings" Many still are. The key is that the government opens its buildings for use by all religions and does not discriminate. "many govt meetings were held in churches" Less common, but I'd be surprised if it never happens. "almost all public schools used the Bible for a text" Still happens. I went to a public high school in NJ where we read the Bible in English class without any fuss. Any time this has ever been brought up in court, it's been defended without qualification. "Our founders wrote the first to protect those things, not eliminate them." They wrote the first to ensure that the US government would never take a side in religious matters. A politician going to church does not endanger that. Government buildings opening themselves to use by religious organizations does not endanger that as long as they remain open for EVERY religious organization. A government function opening with a basic Christian prayer would not have endangered that in an age where damn near everybody in America was some kind of Christian. A government function including a Christian prayer nowadays DOES endanger that, and don't try the straw man about how it might "offend" someone - this is about the government taking a side in an area where the founders wanted it to stay neutral.
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