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The Renunciation of Pope Benedict XVI

Judy3173 Wrote: Feb 13, 2013 5:52 AM
As a Catholic I want to thank you for a wonderful column on this Pope. I had the privilege to see him and hear him speak when I was in Rome. It will be interesting to see who his successor is, but rest assured he will never be liberal enough for this country, thank goodness.
truiz73 Wrote: Feb 13, 2013 12:40 PM
I wouldn't cross the street to meet him except to witness to him and lead him in the sinners' prayer whereupon he would accept Jesus as his Lord and Savior. Something catholics ARE NOT taught. Go ahead, make my day and challenge it; I'm a veteran of the holy mother church. Go to www.witnesstocatholics.org for one, and there are many others where you can find the truth but the real meat is God's Word the Holy Bible
Wherewithall Wrote: Feb 13, 2013 12:59 PM
73...I am in agreement with you entirely. We should all belong to a church that studies the bible from front to back and has an atittude of tolerance on various opinions and interpretations based on God's nature and his word. In the bible the more one understands it the more of God's wonderful mysteries begin to reveal themselves. it is a fantastic book and it saddens me tremendously on how so few people on this earth are discovering and coming to realize this truth. The Catholic readings include about 15% of the old and about 70% of the new testaments read over and over again.
tomloreo Wrote: Feb 13, 2013 2:34 PM
You're right, Catholics are not taught to accept Jesus as their Lord and Savior. It is something we know for a fact from the time of our earliest remembrance as children and something we know throughout our lives. Your presumptions and challenges are beneath any God fearing soul as you know not what you speak or do. So Father, forgive them, for they know not what they speak.
Akennas55 Wrote: Feb 13, 2013 3:36 PM
truiz73 - You are convicted by the evil venom in your words. The greatest commandment is to love God, and the second great commandment is to love your neighbor as yourself. You fail miserably on the latter, and so fail the former as well.

The media, of course, is calling it a resignation. But it not so much a resignation of a political office as it is a renunciation. The 85-year old pontiff’s decision to renounce the power and prestige of the papal office is so unexpected, almost unprecedented, as to take the world by surprise.

Of course, we Americans of all people can understand what thoughts must have coursed through Pope Benedict XVI’s mind as he prayed about this weighty decision. We saw this kind of renunciation with our first president, George Washington. He did not leave the presidency before his second term expired,...