In response to:

The Trouble with Multiculturism

Joseph64 Wrote: Jun 22, 2012 10:33 AM
Multi-culturalism is NOT a positive thing, it is a negative one. A nation can only survive when there is a common culture shared by ALL of it's citizens or else it tears itself apart from within. Foreigners who come here to live need to assimilate and not expect those of us who were here first to bend over backwards to accommodate them.
Reginald10 Wrote: Jun 23, 2012 10:16 PM
No, but the Amish don't cultivate suicide bombers to destroy the "english". (Their term for the non-Amish.)

Come to think of it, neither do the other groups you mention.
nawlins72 Wrote: Jun 23, 2012 8:46 AM
Without references, your argument has very little weight. Selective enforcement occurs under normal circumstances for native born Americans.
Topeka Wrote: Jun 23, 2012 8:38 AM
nawlins...

because they are not - that's the point

it's called selective enforcement - and selective judgment.

... i've seen cases so egregious - from illegals allowed to RAPE - while citizens under mere suspicion are arrested, arraigned, and indicted...
nawlins72 Wrote: Jun 22, 2012 6:00 PM
load, you resort to the 'parsing' nonsense when you have no argument. Each of these groups I mention are different cultures, the fact that they speak English does not refute this. Who claimed that the Amish were the norm? I specifically argue that the US is very much a mixture of many cultures. As for the reference to Cajuns, you make no compelling case. Why WOULDN'T a Cajun fight against an enemy that threatens to harm him and his? It's foolish to believe that we must be a unified mind to recognize an external threat to our existence.
nawlins72 Wrote: Jun 22, 2012 5:56 PM
Joseph, those aren't "values" or "culture". Our system of law is codified in federal and state constitutions and reams of common law. Why would we think that Mexicans would somehow not be held to the law?
Joseph64 Wrote: Jun 22, 2012 5:09 PM
The parts that must be accepted are the fact that we are one country and one people bound by a belief in the freedoms enshrined in the Constitution and not a collection of tribes each with their own ruling body and sets of laws. It was the disorganization of the Indian tribes that ultimately led to their downfall because they were never able to resolve their differences and unite. They continued to make war on one another while the Europeans continued their drive westward and by allowing the race baiters and multi-culturalists to divide us we are becoming as weak as the native Americans were.
loadstar Wrote: Jun 22, 2012 2:35 PM
Parsing and making distinctions of no real difference yet again...those mentioned all speak English and are Americans first...unlike some "Hispanics" waving foreign flags. The Amish are hardly the norm in America anyway.

I lived in N'awlins also...Beaudreaux in da' bayou was certainly not reluctant to go fight for America in WWII. Ethnic Japanese Americans fought bravely in Europe.
nawlins72 Wrote: Jun 22, 2012 1:12 PM
"Multi-culturalism is NOT a positive thing, it is a negative one. A nation can only survive when there is a common culture shared by ALL of it's citizens or else it tears itself apart from within. Foreigners who come here to live need to assimilate and not expect those of us who were here first to bend over backwards to accommodate them."

What parts of the culture must be accepted? We ALL don't share the same culture. The Amish are not the same as Utah Mormons are not the same as New York Italians are not the same as Cajuns.
loadstar Wrote: Jun 22, 2012 11:41 AM
Agree substantially...consider just Quebec or Belgium where they are the same people, but have 2 languages...it causes MANY problems.

I read that the so-called Palestinians are genetically indistinguishable from many Jewish Israeli's yet they hate each other because of different cultures. The Japanese are also genetically the same as the Koreans, but willfully slaughtered their cousins in WWII.

Back in the day, when I was a newspaper columnist in Denver, representatives of the local chapter of the Anti-Defamation League paid a visit. Over coffee, they told the opinion editor and me that they had a program, “A World of Difference,” that “celebrates America’s diversity.” They asked for our editorial support. The editor and I had the same reaction: Would it not be better to celebrate all the things we have in common, all the things that unite Americans of whatever ethnic or religious backgrounds? Our friends left the meeting mightily miffed.

At the time, I viewed such initiatives...