In response to:

The War on Pot: Not a Safe Bet

jmonaco Wrote: Jan 20, 2013 1:05 PM
Pat Kennedy (like his famous relatives) is a pretend defender of civil liberties. Like his father and grandfather he is an authoritarian. Those who continue to return these kinds of people to office surely do not wish to be free men and women. In Plato's Republic, a "just" society is divided into three classes: Guardians (rule makers), Auxiliaries (soldiers and enforcers of the rules), and Workers (those who are forced to follow the arbitrary rules of the guardians). Kennedy (and those like him) secretly resent civil liberties and covet (and apparently achieve) Guardian status in our society. The American Revolution was fought to prevent the creation of a class of would be "kings" yet voters seem determined to simply hand it over.
rk58 Wrote: Jan 20, 2013 9:56 PM
Liberty is an ideal. But the human reality is a lot of folks want to not make decisions and simply be led. This conflict is what causes free societies to not stay free. Most folks want security and simplicity over freedom and taking responsibility. Truly free societies are actually uncomfortable places to live for most folks..
rk58 Wrote: Jan 20, 2013 9:57 PM
And note here.. I'm not arguing against liberty.. far from it.. I just recognize that liberty + human nature intersects at a place that doesn't work out well for liberty.
rk58 Wrote: Jan 20, 2013 9:57 PM
And note here.. I'm not arguing against liberty.. far from it.. I just recognize that liberty + human nature intersects at a place that doesn't work out well for liberty.
As recreational drugs go, marijuana is relatively benign. Unlike alcohol, it doesn't stimulate violence or destroy livers. Unlike tobacco, it doesn't cause lung cancer and heart disease. The worst you can say is that it produces intense, unreasoning panic. Not in users, but in critics.

Those critics have less influence all the time. Some 18 states permit medical use of marijuana, and in November, Colorado and Washington voted to allow recreational use. Nationally, support for legalization is steadily rising. A decade ago, one of every three Americans favored the idea. Today, nearly half do -- and among those under 50, a large...