In response to:

How a Bitter Election Will End

jgoebel Wrote: Nov 04, 2012 6:05 PM
Mr. Chapman, you are right in that we have a heritage of those in power gracefully giving it up if they lose the election, but in a more ideal situation, the losers would say, "We gave it our best shot. We lost. Now we'll cooperate with the winners for the good of the country." That last sentiment has been noticeably absent since the election of 2000.
Cleombrotus2011 Wrote: Nov 04, 2012 7:52 PM
", "We gave it our best shot. We lost. Now we'll cooperate with the winners for the good of the country."

That would be fine if that were their motive, but the fact of the matter is this is exactly what they want : division and confusion. They want to bring down this country and if they suffer a minor setback in this election they are not concerned as they still control all the avenues of information dissemination outside of the internet which does not have the means of affecting the most important sector of their operation, namely the education apparatus which controls the worldview formation of the next generation.

Don't worry. They are patient and can wait us out until we are exhausted.
nomad5 Wrote: Nov 04, 2012 6:56 PM
Actually, it's been absent since the late 1960s, although it's taken years to come to full flower.
Last month, a New York Times story noted "an extraordinary event" in the former Soviet republic of Georgia. President Mikheil Saakashvili, whose human rights record is not exactly the gold standard, "conceded defeat in parliamentary elections," saying gamely that "democracy works in this way."

It was outwardly unremarkable but without precedent. The human rights organization Freedom House pointed out that in Georgia, "this election marks the first time power has changed hands to a rival party through democratic means and diverts from the authoritarian trend witnessed in many of its former Soviet neighbors."

Any country can hold an election. Any country can...