In response to:

Blowing Up History

Jeff2422 Wrote: Jul 19, 2012 12:22 PM
We went to the Grand Canyon many years ago and took one of the standard tours. The Grand Canyon is rather hot and bereft of shade trees. On the tour, we were taken along a stream that had a number of beautiful desiduous trees that provided a greaat deal of shade. The trees were specifically planted when the park was established to provide shade for visitors. It was explained to us that an enviromental group was suing to cut down these well developed trees because they were not indigenous to the area. Bottom line, some people are just morons.
tuttletacoma Wrote: Jul 19, 2012 12:39 PM
these enviro freaks continue to believe that the National Parks should be treated as museums that people should drive through but never stop to enjoy the experience

their attitude has long been, that the vast majority of the great unwashed can never appreciate the wonders of nature, the way the eco freaks can, so our access to them should be limited

BTW, I recently hiked from the south rim down to Phantom Ranch for the night and back out the next day

and like others who have done the same would have liked to see even more trees that would have supplied shade

but since much of the Grand Canyon is more like a desert , you make the adjustment by simply carrying more water while enjoying the magnificent beauty of the canyon
David4 Wrote: Jul 19, 2012 1:24 PM
tuttletacoma wrote: "these enviro freaks continue to believe that the National Parks should be treated as museums that people should drive through but never stop to enjoy the experience"

I have read statements that go further. On rec.backcountry someone advocated that visitors should enter and get about the NPs only on foot. -- I have a cousin who is pleased that there are places protected that he will never be able to visit.
tuttletacoma Wrote: Jul 19, 2012 1:39 PM
yet there are parts of the National Parks that are not things of beauty or that people would want to visit

If you didn't know you were at Yellowstone, and walking through the geyser basins, you might think you were looking at an industrial waste site

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