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All-Time All-Stars: Part II

jclark510 Wrote: Jul 10, 2012 5:45 PM
Bonds, for all of his questionable substance use, stands out because he did his amazing feats in a completely unsegregated MLB. His combination of speed, defense, and all-around hitting when he was younger added to his prodigious power, average, and OPS as he aged was something to behold. He is roundly, and rightly, criticized for his probable PED use (hat sizes aren't supposed to change in your thirties!), but what is often times overlooked is that he was HOF-bound before there were any reasons to wonder about PED use. The numbers he put up for his career in every category are stunning and include 7 MVP awards. 762 HR, 514 SB, 2558 BB ( including an astonishing 688 IBB!), and a 1.051 OPS. Worth consideration.
Stan432 Wrote: Jul 10, 2012 11:09 PM
You wonder what would have happened if he had decent protection for many of the years in SF. And don't forget he usually swung a 32 ounce bat and choked up an inch or so.
Stan432 Wrote: Jul 10, 2012 11:06 PM
You wonder what would have happened if he had decent protection for many of the years in SF.

Editor's note: This column is part II in a series. Part I can be found here.

Trying to choose the greatest pitcher of all time is at least as difficult as trying to choose the greatest hitter of all time. In both cases, the best we can do is narrow down the list.

Outside a charmed circle of five batters, no one had both a higher lifetime batting average and a higher lifetime slugging average than any of those five. In alphabetical order, they are Ty Cobb, Lou Gehrig, Rogers Hornsby, Babe Ruth and Ted Williams. There are other batters whose...