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In response to:

Voter Fraud and Voter I.D.

gskuc2003 Wrote: Nov 15, 2014 12:48 AM
More evidence voter ID laws don't suppress minority voting Posted: 3:26 p.m. Thursday, May 9, 2013 | Filed in: Opinion http://www.ajc.com/weblogs/kyle-wingfield/2013/may/09/more-evidence-v "A new Census Bureau report provides more evidence that the changing demographics of the United States are having a deep impact at the voting booth. "The report on the 2012 election found that for the first time on record, black voters turned out to the presidential polls at a higher rate than whites. More than 66% of eligible blacks voted in the presidential contest that pit President Barack Obama against Republican nominee Mitt Romney. Only 64.1% of whites turned out to vote." (link and emphasis added) The CNN story doesn't examine these turnout rates in light of voter ID laws. Critics say these laws are designed to suppress turnout among minority voters. Never mind that, as the Supreme Court has found, there is no evidence that these laws lead to such suppression. Never mind, too, that suggesting minorites won't or can't be bothered to obtain an ID in order to vote is an awfully strange way of defending them. So, I did look at the turnout rates in states with photo ID laws for voters. And, contrary to what you may have been told, voter ID laws are not suppressing minority turnout. Unless, that is, they're simply suppressing white turnout even more. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, four states (including Georgia) have "strict" photo ID requirements. Another seven have photo ID requirements. Here's how black turnout compared to white turnout in those 11 states: In five (Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Michigan and Tennessee) black turnout surpassed white turnout. In four (Kansas, Louisiana, New Hampshire and South Dakota) there was no statistical difference between black and white turnout rates. In two (Hawaii and Idaho) white turnout surpassed black turnout. In three (Florida, Georgia and New Hampshire) the gap was definitely smaller than the national average. In five (Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Michigan and Tennessee) the gap was reported as a range, 15 to 19.9 percentage points, that means it could have been smaller than the national average but also could have been larger. In three (Kansas, Louisiana and South Dakota) the gap was definitely larger than the national average. So, in states with photo-ID requirements: Black turnout surpassed or equaled white turnout in the vast majority of them (9 of 11).
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