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Obama Pushes For Universal Pre-K in SOTU Speech - What's It Worth?

George3324 Wrote: Feb 13, 2013 2:33 PM
Finland is recognized as having the best public education in the world. Children do not enter that system until they are seven years old.
TROUBLED_CALIFORNIAN Wrote: Feb 13, 2013 3:15 PM
seems your facts were from your But.

Finland provides three years of maternity leave and subsidized day care to parents, and preschool for all 5-year-olds, where the emphasis is on play and socializing. In addition, the state subsidizes parents, paying them around 150 euros per month for every child until he or she turns 17. Ninety-seven percent of 6-year-olds attend public preschool, where children begin some academics. Schools provide food, medical care, counseling and taxi service if needed. Stu­dent health care is free.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/people-places/Why-Are-Finlands-Schools-Successful.html#ixzz2KoPUPREP
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TROUBLED_CALIFORNIAN Wrote: Feb 13, 2013 2:38 PM
"the best public education in the world"

You know you said the word "public education".

they will throw you under the bus if you sound the slightest bit normal.
The section on expanding government funding for pre-K schooling programs around the country took up only a few minutes of President Obama's State of the Union address, but is heavily emphasized by the White House. While "universal pre-K" makes for good rhetoric, actual implementation of the policy makes all the difference in the world - and there's good reason to question the efficacy of such programs.

"Tonight, I propose working with states to make high-quality preschool available to every child in America," Obama said. "In states that make it a priority to educate our youngest children, like Georgia or Oklahoma,...