In response to:

Revealed: The Newest, Secret Tactic by the American Federation of Teachers to Get You to Cough Up More Cash

everyonesfacts4usall Wrote: Sep 23, 2012 11:20 AM
Okay to bring some nuance to kevlar's points. Dropout rate is correct. This seems about average across the US for a district that has 87% of students at or below poverty rate. Never understood why people care where others send their kids to school. The interesting thing here is that teachers are more likely to send kids to public schools than others with the same financial status. This is something I know, but don't particularly care about but Ransom & Kevlar I think will. Household income seems right. Yes, college graduates tend to marry college graduates. A college degree still provides more salary, on average, than not doing so. I am not sure what the point is here.
everyonesfacts4usall Wrote: Sep 23, 2012 11:24 AM
The hours per week seem right for a year if one only counts contract hours. But teachers work more than that. Did you know that teachers are more likely to work Sundays than the average American worker? (This is not contractual.)

The average American worker works 37.5 hours and 49 weeks. Teachers average about 50 (self-reported)
hours a week and 37 weeks. You do the math and see if they, on average, are working less than you. Oh, by the way the 37 weeks does not include coming in in the summer to set up classes and the like...

Oh, and an inner city public school teacher consistently ranks as one of the top 10 most stressful jobs.
71 911E, TX Wrote: Sep 23, 2012 3:27 PM
Your numbers concerning "the average American Worker" are woefully skewed. I work a "9-5" job, like most American workers. I average 50 hours+ per week. That's one reason unemployment remains high: companies are asking their workers to do more, and with the job market so bad (I could get into why, but trying to illustrate Obummer's woeful policies would fly right over your head) workers will continue to put in the extra time. Hence, there is less of a need for more workers as the ones working are both more efficient and more effective.
everyonesfacts4usall Wrote: Sep 23, 2012 8:43 PM
Tex, the Bureau of Labor Statistics begs to differ.
Drifter33 Wrote: Sep 23, 2012 11:23 AM
I'd have to echo YOUR last statement: "I'm not sure what the point is here."

everyonesfacts4usall Wrote: Sep 23, 2012 11:27 AM
Thanks Drifter. Yes do Kevlar think teachers salaries should be tied to the average income of their student's families so CPS teachers make 40K and Oak Brook, IL make say 150k. I don't get it.
everyonesfacts4usall Wrote: Sep 23, 2012 11:27 AM
Thanks Drifter. Yes do Kevlar think teachers salaries should be tied to the average income of their student's families so CPS teachers make 40K and Oak Brook, IL make say 150k. I don't get it.
jimmyjames4 Wrote: Sep 23, 2012 1:10 PM
Well if I were a Teacher, and the product I produced was so mediorce, I'd count my lucky stars I still had a job. But Unions change the way Teachers are held accountable, don't they. Perhaps teacing Gay studies and revisionist History isn't the way to go. Reading, Writing and Arithmetic are fundamental, necessary skills and build the foundation that more enthusiastic students can leverage.

Kevlar wrote: Lots of us owe our love of numbers to our Public School Education.

40 percent is the drop-out rate for Chicago Public School Children

40 percent is how many Chicago Public School Teachers won’t send their kids to any public school…not even in Suburbia

40 percent of Chicago Public School 8th Graders rated “basic” and 36 percent rated “below basic” so nearly 80% were not proficient in reading

40 thousand dollars – average household income of Chicago Tax Payers ----- well over 100 thousand is the average household income of Chicago Public School Teachers

40...

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