1 - 10 Next
Agreed. I am an atheist. As such, I know how it feels to hold views not shared and even reviled by many in our society. You may understand then how alarming it is to hear members of the dominant religious group speak of their sense of persecution and brand those holding different views bigots. History often reveals dominant groups working themselves into a lather about perceived wrongs against them before they lash out to “restore” matters as they see fit.
Because public schools are part of the government and because government must in keeping with the Constitution refrain from promoting religion the schools cannot themselves promote religion. At the same time, individuals are free to exercise and express their religious views. Students can do so at school, as long as they do so in a time, manner, and place that does not interfere with school programs and activities. School employees can do so when acting in their capacity as individuals rather than when acting as agents of the government.
Calling on government to constrain itself in accordance with the Constitution is, by AFA's reckoning, anti-Christian bigotry? Too ridiculous for serious discussion.
Thank you for clarifying. I now see where the confusion lies. I have indeed told any number of folks here that they are wrong about this or that. To the extent that some of those folks are Christians, I have thus told Christians that they are wrong. I of course am hardly alone in that. Indeed, nearly everyone commenting here tells someone else they are wrong. That is much the nature of blogging on sites such as this. That though is entirely different than telling someone they are wrong ABOUT THEIR OWN RELIGION. I have not presumed to tell people that I know more about their own religion than they do and they got their own religion wrong. So, no inconsistency and certainly no hypocrisy on my part in declining to tell Muslims they misunderstand their own religion while also telling commenters here, some of whom are Christians, that they are wrong about this or that political, legal, or social issue.
The depth of your misunderstanding is revealed, and it seems to allow for no further discussion.
How--exactly--did I tell Christians they are wrong about their own religion? BTW, observing that someone makes a chest thumping declaration in no way says they are wrong about their own religion.
Rest assured I've been paying attention. As for the effect of law on even the majority, see my response above to Mudonthetires.
I don't see your point. And what's this about chest thumping?
You make my point. Do you suppose that Christians are the only ones who sometimes dislike what the law requires of them? Confronted by questions about the government requiring or prohibiting something that conflicts with someone’s faith, the courts have generally ruled that under the Constitution the government cannot enact laws specifically aimed at a particular religion (which would be regarded a constraint on religious liberty contrary to the First Amendment), but can enact laws generally applicable to everyone or at least broad classes of people (e.g., laws concerning pollution, contracts, torts, crimes, discrimination, employment, etc.) and can require everyone, including those who may object on religious grounds, to abide by them. (E.g., http://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/494/872/case.html)
Alarming headline--ridiculously so. All this talk of persecution of Christians in America is concerning. Christians dominate American society and politics. Christians of all sorts comprise about 78% of the population; Catholics comprise about 24%. Christians comprise 87% of members of Congress; Jews 6%; the remainder claim a smattering of other faiths or decline to state; the one openly atheist (former) member lost his last primary. http://www.pewforum.org/2012/11/16/faith-on-the-hill-the-religious-composition-of-the-113th-congress/ Six justices of the Supreme Court are Catholic; three are Jewish. The President is Christian, as was the one before him, and before him, etc. The official national motto is “In God we trust.” The government prescribes a pledge of allegiance declaring that our nation is “under God.” Presidents and other politicians close their speeches with the obligatory “God bless America.” Federal and state laws naturally reflect the views of the religious electorate for the most part. Even though Christianity remains by far the dominant religious influence in our society, Christians no doubt have occasionally confronted disappointment and dislike regarding this or that government decision. It should hardly be supposed, though, that they experience anywhere near as much of that as other smaller, less influential groups. When I hear a member of that dominant religion express feelings of persecution and such, the image of a privileged child comes to mind–one who, faced with the prospect of treatment comparable to that experienced by others, howls in pained anguish at the injustice of it all and pines for the good old days. As an atheist, I know how it feels to hold views not shared and even reviled by many in our society. You may understand then how alarming it is to hear members of the dominant religious group speak of their sense of persecution. History often reveals dominant groups working themselves into a lather about perceived wrongs against them before they lash out to “restore” matters as they see fit.
1 - 10 Next