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In response to:

Say NO to GMOs in Your Food

Doug5062 Wrote: Jun 04, 2013 3:17 PM
Mr. Norris, this is one of the few times I must respectfully disagree with your policy position. Genetic modification of crops and livestock has been occurring since medieval monks began cross-breeding pea-plants and the nobility started conducting selective breeding for specific traits in dogs, cattle, and draft-horses. Current genetic science has permitted the identification of the genes responsible for desired plant and animal traits already occurring in nature and facilitates a more focused cross-breeding to obtain the desired outcome. Most high-yield rice crops are low in vitamin A. Strains of rice with high concentrations of naturally occurring vitamin A provide low yields and are far more labor-intensive to grow. Three billion people depend on rice as their staple food, with 10 percent at risk for vitamin A deficiency, which, according to the World Health Organization, causes 250,000 to 500,000 children to go blind each year. Scientists were able to cross-breed “golden rice,” by introducing the genes from vitamin A producing rice into an existing strain of rice that grows well in a number of climates and provides farmers with high-yield crops. Franciscan monks could have done EXACTLY the same thing over a span of thirty to forty years. Botanists were able to isolate the vitamin A producing gene in a low-yield and difficult to grow strain of rice and cross-breed it to a compatible high-yield and broad-climate host—in about 4 years. However, based on opposition from Greenpeace, it has taken 12 years for farmers to get permission to grow it for human consumption. The Irish potato famine 1845-1849 was the result of bacterial blight spoiling the potato strain most commonly planted in Ireland for high-yield crops. The bacterial that caused the blight in 1845 is no longer an issue—today’s potato crops, the result of selective breeding, are naturally resistant to the blight. If we could have introduced today’s potato into Irish agrarian-society in 1844, would we hold back and allow a million men, women and children to starve to death because the current strain of blight-resistant potato hadn’t naturally evolved yet? Likewise, do we allow ½ million children to go blind because the strain of rice that contains vitamin A was expressly breed using our knowledge of science—instead of 40 years of cross-breeding crops through trial-and-error? The truly sad condemnation of our species is that the “enlightened” anti-GMOs activists would adamantly say “yes” in both instances.
In response to:

Say NO to GMOs in Your Food

Doug5062 Wrote: Jun 04, 2013 2:19 PM
Really a rather remarkable feat: a pointless, inarticulate, and crudely expressed thought; combined in a sentence demonstrating both poor grammar and improper punctuation.
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